Posts By / thompsonk

SAMARCH (SAlmoid MAnagement Round the CHannel) team brave the cold to find and tag sea trout

On Tuesday 6th February, Bournemouth University Research Associate Katie Thompson from the Department of Life and Environmental Sciences (SciTech) joined the SAMARCH (Salmonid Management round the Channel) team in search of sea trout in the river Frome. The five year EU Interreg Channel Programme funded project (2017-2022) will track juvenile salmon and juvenile and adult sea trout through four English and French estuaries to fill the gaps in our knowledge of how quickly fish migrate through intertidal habitat, their migration pathways and where adult sea trout spend time at sea. Currently, 95% of our salmon and sea trout die at sea, compared to only 75% in the 1970s. The project aims to answer the question of what proportion of this mortality occurs in estuaries and coastal waters compared to the open sea by using small acoustic and data storage tags. The project includes 10 partners from France and England who are a blend of research and regulatory organisations, and key stakeholders (Bournemouth University, Game and Wildlife Conservation Trust, University of Exeter, INRA Science & Impact, Environment Agency, Salmon and Trout Conservation, Agro Campus, Agence française pour la biodiversité, Normandie grands migrateurs, Obersvatoire des poissons migrateurs Bretagne).
If you would like to know more about the project then you can follow online via:http://samarch.orghttp://www.wessexportal.co.uk/category/samarch-salmonid-management-round-the-channel or contact Katie Thompson on thompsonk@bournemouth.ac.uk or Genoveva Esteban gesteban@bournemouth.ac.uk.

 

Dig for…eco toilets!

Over the last week, the ‘Sustainable Green Toilet Project’ has begun in Kenya, where excavations have been completed and foundations are now being built. Bournemouth University Research Associate Katie Thompson from the Department of Life and Environmental Sciences (SciTech) is working alongside ACEF (Akamba Children’s Education Fund) charity volunteers and BU students to build the new toilet facility for 800 school children who attend and live at the Brainhouse Academy, in Nairobi, Kenya.

The newer, cleaner toilet facilities will feature a bio digester energy recovery system producing biogas for the school and liquid fertiliser. Innovative research will also be investigated into at this location, including utilising energy from microbial life forms to generate electricity.  Katie and the students  will be travelling to Kenya in March this year to continue to work on the project.  Their work is part of the re-designed Wessex Portal  http://www.wessexportal.co.uk/

If you would like to know more about the project and keep up to date with any progress, then follow our blog via: www.wessexportal.co.uk or contact Katie Thompson on thompsonk@bournemouth.ac.uk or Genoveva Esteban gesteban@bournemouth.ac.uk.

Biodome carnivorous plants reveal hidden microbial diversity

Some carnivorous plants hold ‘pools’ within the plant consisting of rainwater and secreted substances such as sugars, used to lure and trap insect prey. Microscopic analysis of this fluid collected from pitcher plants (Sarracenia sp.) and bromeliads (Brocchinia sp.) growing in BU’s Biodome has revealed a rich diversity of single-celled microorganisms. These microbes, less than half a millimetre in length, are known as ciliates and distinguished by hair-like cilia that they use for locomotion and feeding.

Ciliates are incredible important grazers, feeding on bacteria, algae and organic matter, and are crucial part of the microecosystem within the bromeliad and pitcher plant pools, which also includes algae, bacteria and insect larvae and copepods that also grow in such pools, playing an important role in energy transfer from microbes to animals.

One of the microbes found within the pools was the the ciliate Euplotes, pictured about. Copyright Jack Dazley

Katie Thompson (SciTech) becomes an expert for Global Animal Protection (World Animal Protection Charity)

Katie’s recent work in Africa is driven by her passion for African wildlife, where her research focuses on ecosystem level conservation, environmental education and sustainable development. She was honoured to be personally invited by the Science Diplomat of the U.S. Embassy to represent Bournemouth University as a subject matter expert at the London Zoohackathon 2017, hosted by the Zoological Society of London. She advised coders how to identify technological solutions to the illegal wildlife trade from her experience in the field. Following this, Katie recently published an article for the U.S. Embassy (read here) and is now delighted to join a team of experts on the Global Animal Protection, as part of the renowned wildlife charity, World Animal Protection (find out more here). Katie works with Professor Genoveva Esteban as a Research Associate in the Department of Life and Environmental Sciences (SciTech).

BU researcher meets BBC presenter, Saba Douglas-Hamilton

Research Associate Katie Thompson was honoured to meet the BBC wildlife presenter and lifelong conservationist Saba Douglas-Hamilton at her talk ‘Life with Elephants’ last week. It was a fantastic opportunity to meet fellow conservationists, and Saba herself to talk about the incredible research work they lead across the African continent. Her father founded the renowned NGO, ‘Save the Elephants’ where Katie visited their research station in April 2017 in Kenya. Further research developments have lead Katie to liaise with directors from ‘Elephants Alive’, their partner charity in South Africa. She continues to develop close links with these NGOs and the Life and Environmental Sciences Department at Bournemouth University, with research focusing on elephant conservation and their impact on the ecosystem.

Exploring Plankton Diversity in Southampton Water

Undergraduate students in the department of Life and Environmental Sciences investigated the diversity of phytoplankton and zooplankton in Southampton water as part of their third-year Biological Oceanography module. Using the research vessel RV Callista at the National Oceanography Centre Southampton (NOCS), samples were collected at 5 locations, or “stations”, between Calshott and the Itchen River. Environmental data was collected at each station using an array of sensors, measuring parameters such as temperature, salinity, chlorophyll and oxygen concentration. Phytoplankton were collected at two depths at each site, representing deep and shallow water. Zooplankton was caught using a plankton net, with a 120µm mesh to catch zooplankton in the net. These samples were subsequently analysed back at the university.

Trawls and grab samples were also used to investigate the benthic (bottom dwelling) communities living on the seabed and to analyse the oxygen conent of the sediment. Benthic animals found included starfish, fish such as gobies and flounders, cuttlefish, crabs and ‘moss animals’ (bryozoans).

Back at BU, the phyto- and zooplankton samples were analysed using microscopy. A variety of diatoms and dinoflagellates were found in the phytoplankton samples, and barnacle larvae, copepods and the larvae of marine worms were found in the zooplankton samples. Microbes too small to be seen under the microscope were counted using flow cytometry, a technique used to identify cyanobacteria and other minute cells.

The study demonstrated the great diversity of planktonic and benthic life in Southampton water, and highlighted the importance of monitoring and understanding the microscopic life of the sea since the microscopic life , as the base of the food web, is crucial in sustaining the larger and better understood forms of marine life.

 

 

 

 

Sustainable Green Toilet Project in Kenya

Bournemouth University Research Associate Katie Thompson joined a group of volunteers in April 2017 to initiate a Sustainable Green Toilet Project in Kenya, with the charity ACEF. The aim of this project is to build a new toilet facility for 800 school children (including over 100 orphans) who attend and live at the Brainhouse Academy, a school situated in one of the world’s largest slums (Mathare North) in Nairobi, Kenya.

As well as replacing the existing toilets with newer, cleaner toilet facilities which are equipped with hand washing facilities and lighting, these ‘green’ toilets will also feature an energy recovery system which will produce biogas: a clean and renewable gas which can be safely used for cooking and lighting the school.

This project will deliver multiple benefits including improved sanitation and treatment of toilet wastes to protect the local environment and reduce the risk of children catching deadly diseases, while producing a biogas which will be used in the school’s kitchen to replace the wood and charcoal fires. The project will act as a beacon of sustainable technology within the slum which could be replicated to improve the lives of thousands.

The planning and development stages have begun, with the aim of constructing the toilets early 2018, where BU Research Associate Katie Thompson continues to be involved in. If you would like to know more about the project and keep up to date with any advances then follow our blog via: http://www.wessexportal.co.uk/conservation/ or contact Katie Thompson on thompsonk@bournemouth.ac.uk or Genoveva Esteban gesteban@bournemouth.ac.uk.