Category / Research themes

A Cloud-Based Collaborative Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) for the Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) in the Sultanate of Oman

We would like to invite you to the latest research seminar of the Centre for Games and Music Technology Research.

Title: A Cloud-Based Collaborative Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) for the Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) in the Sultanate of Oman.

 

Speaker: Mohammed Al hajri

Time: 2:00PM-3:00PM

Date: Wednesday 3rd May 2017

Room: PG11, Poole House, Talbot Campus

 

Abstract: It is becoming increasingly difficult to ignore the demand to migrate or to adopt cloud computing into not only companies but also educational institutions. New trends in this promising field have been playing significant and critical roles in delivering educational services and applications to stakeholders.

Oman and other developing countries could benefit from a cloud-based collaborative VLE where students and faculty members could have access to online facilities to collaborate effectively achieving the potential aims of their courses and programs. HEIs especially in Oman spend high portions of their budgets to establish and maintain IT systems while not all HEIs can afford to have their separate IT systems network due to its unaffordable cost.

This research critically assesses the current ICT infrastructure and any cloud-based collaborative initiatives used in Universities and Colleges in Oman and attempt to explore the existing VLEs in HEIs in Oman. Furthermore, the research will develop a framework which will adopt the contribution from analysing any related frameworks and models in the field or in adjacent areas. The proposed framework is aiming to make a unified and collaborative VLE that can be shared and utilised by several HEIs in Oman which will enable them to exchange and share educational resources among themselves and to reduce the cost of IT expenses in software, hardware and technical support. Thus, this research is aiming to get the maximum benefits of cloud computing to be applied in collaborative VLEs and use it as a model to improve the current IT infrastructure implemented in this environment. Also, the proposed framework can be adapted and adopted by similar developing countries.

 

We hope to see you there.

Masterclass: The clinical doctorate model – Enabling Practitioner Research

Monday 15th May 2017, 14.00 – 15.30, Lansdowne Campus

This masterclass will be presented by Professor Vanora Hundley, Deputy Dean for Research and Professional Practice, Faculty of Health & Social Sciences. The development of a clinical PhD studentship utilises the opportunity to bring in research income, while developing a bespoke educational opportunity that is attractive to employers and directly relevant to practice. Professor Hundley’s clinical doctorate model has been recognised nationally as an example of excellent practice which facilitates Knowledge Exchange and enhances future research collaborations.

This is part of the Leading Innovation Masterclasses series.

There are two other masterclasses in May: ‘Developing Interdisciplinarity’ with Professor Barry Richards, and ‘Benchmarking your students’ digital experience’ with Jisc’s Sarah Knight.

Find out more about these and book a place at the following link:
Leading Innovation – Masterclasses

Deadline Extended: Machine Learning in Medical Diagnosis and Prognosis

The deadline has been extended to the 14th of April , 2017.

This is a call for papers for the Special Session on Machine Learning in Medical Diagnosis and Prognosis at IEEE CIBCB 2017.

The IEEE International Conference on Computational Intelligence in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (IEEE CIBCB 2017) will be held at the INNSIDE Hotel, Manchester from August 23rd to 25th, 2017.

This annual conference has become a major technical event in the field of Computational Intelligence and its application to problems in biology, bioinformatics, computational biology, chemical informatics, bioengineering and related fields. The conference provides a global forum for academic and industrial scientists from a range of fields including computer science, biology, chemistry, medicine, mathematics, statistics, and engineering, to discuss and present their latest research findings from theory to applications.

The topics of interest for the special session include (but are not limited to):

  • Medical image classification
  • Medical image analysis
  • Expert systems for computer aided diagnosis and prognosis
  • Pattern recognition in the analysis of biomarkers for medical diagnosis
  • Deep learning in medical image processing and analysis
  • Ethical and Security issues in machine learning for medical diagnosis and prognosis

Up-to-date information and submission details can be found on the IEEE CIBCB 2017. The submission deadline is the 14th of April, 2017.

Please e-mail srostami@bournemouth.ac.uk with any questions.

Humanisation Special Interest Group meeting BU 11th April 2017

We are a group of scholars and practitioners who have an interest in what makes us Feel Human and how this is linked to Health, Wellbeing, Dignity and Compassion. We use Lifeworld approaches and subjective experience as the basis for our understanding. For more information please click here

At meetings we discuss issues following two presentations, and share our on-going work into humanisation in education, practice and research.

Our next meeting is

On April 11th 2017,  From 2pm to 4.30 pm,  At Lansdowne Campus, EB202

The two presentations are

  •  The relatives’ experience of acquired brain injury and the humanising role of the Expert Companion Mark Holloway – Brain Injury Case Manager Head First, SSCR Fellow
  •  Using photography to encourage introspection among GPs Rutherford – Senior Lecturer, Bournemouth University

If you are not already  a member of the Humanisation SIG e-mail group and would like to be, please contact Caroline Ellis-Hill 

For further details of the topics and speakers  please click here

All Staff and Students are welcome

Masterclass: An innovative approach to setting up a Research Hub

Monday 10th April, 10.00 – 11.30 at Lansdowne Campus

In this masterclass, Tom Wainwright will share how he and Professor Middleton formed the Orthopaedic Research Institute; how they presented the concept to the board and the considerations that they believe made their pitch successful. It is hoped that delegates will be able to draw parallels from this experience that may be useful in different research contexts.

This is part of the Leading Innovation Masterclasses series.

There are three final masterclasses in May: ‘Developing Interdisciplinarity’ with Professor Barry Richards, ‘Benchmarking your students’ digital experience’ with Jisc’s Sarah Knight, and ‘The clinical doctorate model – Enabling Practitioner Research’ with Professor Vanora Hundley.

Find out more about these and book a place at the following link:
Leading Innovation – Masterclasses

New midwifery paper by Dr. Jenny Hall

Congratulations to Dr. Jenny Hall in the Centre for Midwifery, Maternal & Perinatal Health (CMMPH) on the publication of her paper ‘Spiritual aspects of living with infertility: synthesis of qualitative studies’. [1]  Dr. Hall co-authored this paper in the Journal of Clinical Nursing with colleagues from Ireland and Portugal.

This international team conducted review and synthesis of qualitative research to seek a deeper understanding of the spiritual aspects of patients’ experiences of infertility.  They concluded that infertile couples’ experiences of infertility may offer an opportunity for spiritual care particularly related to the assessment of spiritual needs and the promotion of spiritual coping strategies. Moreover, effective holistic care should support couples in overcoming and finding meaning in this life and health condition.

Prof. Edwin van Teijlingen

CMMPH

What is FoMO and how do you deal with it?

Students and staff attended 14:Live in the Student Centre, on Tuesday afternoon to hear from Dr Miguel Moital about FoMO.

FoMO is a fairly new area of research which looks into the psychology behind the ‘Fear of Missing Out’.

With the upcoming festival season, the session looked at FoMO in relation to festivals and marketing tactics used to convince consumers to attend.

Much of the research has been conducted by events management undergraduate students Ellie Taylor and Helena Jarman who previously worked on the topic as part of their dissertation.

Ellie was the pioneer conducting the first dissertation on the topic, whilst Helena worked with Dr Miguel Moital during June-July 2016 as a Student Research Assistant. Helena collated and organised material around FoMO in events leading up to the organisation of a workshop for local event professionals. The students created and provided a large amount of material for 14:Live.

The fear of missing out is a psychological fear that comes from a heightened sensation that everyone but us appears to be having more fun. Social media can often make us feel as though we’re missing out on socially driven events and experiences, because of posts from friends, family or even strangers.

FoMO appeals are often used by marketers to sell an event or product to consumers. Marketers often use specific communication tactics which play on someone’s emotions. This can include using ‘highlights videos’ and using techniques such as ‘75%’ sold out. This then encourages you to book early or attend at the risk of ‘missing out’ on the event.

Dr Moital commented “We looked at the types of emotions felt when experiencing FoMO, what it is people miss out on, how people may behave when they feel FOMO, the types of communication tactics that can be used when designing FoMO event marketing appeals, and what strategies can individuals reduce the levels of FOMO,”

“The session was very interactive and it was great to see a mix of colleagues from faculties and professional services, as well as a number of very engaged students.”

If you’d like to hear more about FoMO please contact Dr Miguel Moital.

14:Live is monthly lunchtime session, that discusses the different areas of research being undertaken here at BU. If you’d like to hear more about 14:Live please contact Hannah Jones.

‘How boards strategize’ explored in new student-staff study

Marg Concannon

The strategy work of boards of directors has been a puzzle in the corporate governance literature for a long time. But the picture is becoming clearer, thanks to a paper soon to be published and co-written by a Master’s graduate and staff member in the Faculty of Management at BU.

After the financial crisis the work of boards became especially pertinent, for companies and public policy. Some boards — think of Royal Bank of Scotland and HBOS — manifestly failed both in strategizing  and in monitoring the performance of managers. The shortcomings contributed to a long, global economic malaise. Margaret Concannon earned an MSc in Corporate Governance with Distinction at BU in 2015 with a dissertation that examined how the work of boards has changed. Now, writing with Donald Nordberg, Associate Professor of Strategy and Corporate Governance, her study has become a journal article, due to appear soon in European Management Journal.

Donald Nordberg

Their paper, “Boards strategizing in liminal spaces: Process and practice, formal and informal,” shows how the theory of liminality, developed in anthropology to study rites of passage and adapted in organisation studies, can explain how, after the crisis, the increasingly hierarchical nature of the monitoring work of boards has pushed often strategy off the formal agenda. But strategizing has emerged again in new, informal settings and spaces, where the creativity possible in liminality can reassert itself. The paper explores what benefits that brings — and what risks.

New publication: vital signs obstetric charts

Congratulations on the Faculty of Health & Social Sciences team which had its paper ‘Vital signs and other observations used to detect deterioration in pregnant women: an analysis of vital sign charts in consultant-led UK maternity units’ accepted by the International Journal of Obstetric Anesthesia (published by Elsevier). 
The paper compares: (i) vital sign values used to define physiological normality; (ii) symptoms and signs used to escalate care; (iii) 24 type of chart used; and (iv) presence of explicit instructions for escalating care. The authors conclude that the wide range of ‘normal’ vital sign values in different systems used in the UK and the Channel Islands suggests a lack of equity in the processes for detecting deterioration and escalating care in hospitalised pregnant and postnatal women. Agreement regarding ‘normal’ vital sign ranges is urgently required and would assist the development of a standardised obstetric early warning system and chart. The lead author of this new paper is FHSS Visiting Professor Gary Smith, his co-authors include FHSS staff Vanora Hundley, Lisa Gale_Andrews and Edwin van Teijlingen as well as three BU Visiting Faculty: Debra Bick (King’s College London), Mike Wee (Poole Hospital NHS Foundation Trust) and Richard Isaacs (University Hospital Southampton).