Category / data management

Bristol Online Surveys (BOS) are transferring to Jisc

Bristol Online Surveys (BOS)

BOS is currently managed by the University of Bristol and provided as a service to the UK HE community.  On 1 August 2017, ownership will be transferred to Jisc.  Following transfer to Jisc it is expected that the ‘look and feel’ of BOS should remain the same.

BOS account access is set up by IT Services who are account administrators.  Researchers wishing to use a BOS survey should put a request through the IT Service Desk (SNOW).

It is important to note that on  1 August 2017, BOS will be unavailable for around 48 hours.  We do not know the exact time period at the moment.  More information is available on the BOS site:

https://www.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/transfer-to-jisc-faqs-and-information/

Transfer to Jisc: FAQs
Transfer to Jisc: FAQs for Primary Contacts

The challenges and rewards of teaching qualitative analysis with software

Qualitative research is gaining momentum in social sciences, education and health, with new developments appearing every year for gathering, analysing and disseminating data. This session will focus on the teaching and learning potential of specialised programmes for the process of systematising and analysing qualitative data.

The session will cover the basic features of computer assisted qualitative data analysis software (CAQDAS) and their possible role in students’ understanding of qualitative analysis. Specifically, it will be suggested that the process of data analysis and related techniques (content, thematic, framework and discourse analysis, to name a few) should beadvanced before students engagement with CAQDAS, but that CAQDAS have the potential to enhance students’understanding of qualitative data analysis in practice. The session will outline some practice-based recommendations for engaging students when running interactive qualitative data analysis sessions in general andworkshops for CAQDAS in particular.

Aims and objectives:

  • To introduce attendees to the basic and advance features of CAQDAS
  • To discuss the challenges and rewards of teaching qualitative analysis using CAQDAS
  • To stimulate discussion around qualitative methods teaching

Save the date: Monday 24 April, 12.00-13.30. Talbot Campus.

Bookings should be made through the Intranet, with Organisational Development.

The session will be facilidated by Dr Jacqueline Priego, who has been delivering CAQDAS workshops and training postgraduate students and researchers on qualitative analysis since 2010. She is also available for queries relating to MAXQDA and QDAMiner (not supported at BU).

Making the Most of Writing Week Part 7: BUCRU – not just for Writing Week!

We’re coming to the end of Writing Week in the Faculty of Health and Social Sciences and by now you will have made a good start or have put the finishing touches to your academic writing projects. Over the last week, we have given you some tips on writing grant applications and highlighted some of the expertise within BUCRU. If you didn’t get the chance to pop in and see us we thought it would be useful to remind you what we’re about and how we can help.

Bournemouth University Clinical Research Unit (BUCRU) supports researchers in improving the quality, quantity and efficiency of research across the University and local National Health Service (NHS) Trusts. We do this by:

  • Helping researchers develop high quality applications for external research funding (including small grants)
  • Ongoing involvement in funded research projects
  • A “pay-as-you-go” consultation service for other work.

How can we help?

BUCRU can provide help in the following areas:

  • Study design
  • Quantitative and qualitative research methods
  • Statistics, data management and data analysis
  • Patient and public involvement in research
  • Trial management
  • Ethics, governance and other regulatory issues
  • Linking University and NHS researchers

Our support is available to Bournemouth University staff and people working locally in the NHS, and depending on the support you require, is mostly free of charge. There are no general restrictions on topic area or professional background of the researcher.

If you would like support in developing your research please get in touch through bucru@bournemouth.ac.uk or by calling us on 01202 961939. Please see our website for further information, details of our current and previous projects and a link to our recent newsletter.

Making the Most of Writing Week Part 6: What to do with your data

You don’t have to spend Writing Week working on grant applications. You may already have a dataset and now you finally have some time to do something with it. But where to start? It’s often a good idea to go back to your original research questions/aims/objectives. As we said yesterday, a well thought out research question can help shape your analysis strategy.
Hopefully you will have a record of which variables you were measuring and how data were coded. Were any calculations performed using the raw data to create new variables? How were these done? This is all part of good data management. To find out more visit the information pages created by the Library and Learning Support Team.
Once you are reacquainted with your data, it’s often a good idea (in the case of quantitative data) to start plotting graphs to find out more. Always keep in mind the original aims of the study, it’s easy to wander down a path of distraction. If you are feeling confused by all of this or, have got yourself lost down a data track, the BUCRU team are at hand to help.
Peter Thomas is available on Tuesday and Wednesday while Sharon Docherty is available Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday this week. Why not drop us an email or pop by to see us in R505?

Research Data Management and you!

Research Data Management is a hot topic, especially when applying for grants. We all have our own strategies for managing our data as a product of research. Sometimes data management is in the form of a box or filing cabinet in a locked office, an external hard drive, purchased cloud storage or a hard drive. Whilst this approach is comfortable and familiar, it’s unlikely to comply with funder requirements neither currently nor in the future.

The Library has a created a guide that will help with navigating the diverse requirements of grant funding councils, writing data management plans and all its intricacies. The guide, ‘Research Data Management’ is available here .

We welcome your feedback about this resource, please contact rdm@bournemouth.ac.uk.

There is also a very informative youtube video Data Sharing and Management posted by NYU Health Sciences Library.

New frontiers on tech – big data, the cloud and Internet of Things

Technology in the hands
IT giant, Intel Corporation, is undergoing a massive shift in strategy. While jobs fall by the wayside, Intel has its eye firmly on what analysts are calling ‘new frontiers in technology’, and there are signs that the other tech behemoths are set to follow suit.
Last week, Intel CEO Brian Krzanich outlined his strategy for the chip giant in the years ahead, as it struggles to move away from its dependence on the waning PC market.
The thrust of the new strategy is: ‘transforming Intel from a PC company to a company that powers the cloud and billions of smart, connected computing devices’ and this, says Krzanich, encompasses five core beliefs:
• The cloud is the most important trend shaping the future of the smart, connected world – and thus Intel’s future.
• The many “things” that make up the PC Client business and the internet of things are made much more valuable by their connection to the cloud.
• Memory and programmable solutions such as FPGAs will deliver entirely new classes of products for the data centre and the internet of things.
• 5G will become the key technology for access to the cloud  as we move toward an always-connected world.
• Moore’s Law will continue to progress and Intel will continue to lead in delivering its true economic impact.
For Intel, these core beliefs form a clear virtuous cycle – the cloud and data center, the internet of things, memory s are all bound together by connectivity and enhanced by the economics of Moore’s Law. (Gordon Moore was an Intel co-founder so Moore’s Law is ingrained in the company’s psyche.)
Key to this is the “internet of things,” every device, sensor and console that has potential to connect to the cloud. This means that everything that a “thing” does can be captured as a piece of data, measured in real-time, and becomes accessible from anywhere.
Krzanich believes that: “the biggest opportunity in the internet of things is that it encompasses just about everything in our lives today – it’s ubiquitous. For most areas of industry and retail – from our shoes and clothes to our homes and cars – the internet of things is transforming everything and every experience. At Intel, we will focus on autonomous vehicles, industrial and retail as our primary growth drivers of the internet of things.”
In a time when technology is valued not just for the devices it produces, but for the experiences it makes possible, Intel is banking on the fact that a broader focus, and sharper execution will enable the company to take a lead in a smart, connected world.
Several major corporations have already taken the initiative to push frontier technology, such as Google with its Google Cardboard and Apple’s eventual (maybe?) 3D printer. Layoffs are the inevitable result and, in many cases, are already happening, as more and more companies find themselves having to look in new directions.
With Apple’s iPhone production on the decline comes more evidence that companies’ defining products won’t be what sustains them into the future and that Intel and Krzanich’s new focus on experiences rather than the devices that make these possible is the way to go.

Research Data Management and Sharing – MOOC

data management

Today, an increasing number of funding agencies, journals, and other stakeholders are requiring data producers to share, archive, and plan for the management of their data. In order to respond to these requirements, researchers and information professionals will need the data management and curation knowledge and skills that support the long-term preservation, access, and reuse of data. Effectively managing data can also help optimize research outputs, increase the impact of research, and support open scientific inquiry.

The Curating Research Assets and Data Using Lifecycle Education (CRADLE) Project in collaboration with EDINA at the University of Edinburgh have developed an online course which will provide learners with an introduction to research data management and sharing. After completing this course, learners will understand the diversity of data and their management needs across the research data lifecycle, be able to identify the components of good data management plans, and be familiar with best practices for working with data including the organization, documentation, and storage and security of data. Learners will also understand the impetus and importance of archiving and sharing data as well as how to assess the trustworthiness of repositories. .

After completing this course, learners will also be better equipped to manage data throughout the entire research data lifecycle from project planning to the end of the project when data ideally are shared and made available within a trustworthy repository.

The course material is free to access and if you wish to complete the course with a certificate, there is a charge of £34.

Please click on this link to find out more – https://www.coursera.org/learn/data-management/.