A Review of Gaming Technologies for Stroke Patients

Our next Creative Technology Research Centre Research Seminar will be presented by Owen O’Neil.

Title: A Review of Gaming Technologies for Stroke Patients

Date: Wednesday 13th November 2013

Time: 2 – 3PM

Venue: P302 LTCentre For Digital Entertainment

Abstract: Stroke is a global pandemic and the largest cause of severe adult disability in the world. Incidence rates in the UK suggest that over 150,000 suffer a first time stroke, and over 80% of survivors will suffer some form of motor disability. Rehabilitation typically consists of high volumes of motor practice to engage the mechanism of neural plasticity, a form of cortical rewiring that allows the brain to adapt after damage. Meeting the rehabilitation needs for this population through one-to-one physiotherapy care is currently not possible.  There is a growing impetus on research institutions to explore cost-effective methods for increasing access to rehabilitation that may promote improved functional recovery for patients at home and in the clinic. Recent approaches include the use of video game technology as a method of increasing patient engagement and upkeep to rehabilitation programs. Of particular interest is the emergence of low cost commercial off-the-shelf devices such as the Nintendo Wii and Xbox Kinect.  In this presentation we introduce the state-of-the art application of video game technology as a modality of upper limb motor practice. We translate current approaches and technology in the literature that show particular promise to meet the needs of this population.

UKTI Education: call for case studies

UKTI Education has been set up by the Department for Business Innovation and Skills (BIS) and UK Trade and Investment (UKTI) to help UK education and training providers win business overseas. Their primary objective is to identify high value commercial opportunities overseas and help the UK education sector to access and pursue them, encouraging collaboration and the development of consortia, where appropriate, and supporting and promoting UK bids.

The UK has a strong reputation internationally for excellence in education and training:

  • ­   4 universities in the global top 10; 29 in the top 200
  • ­   1.4m pupils studying at nearly 3,000 British Schools Overseas in 2012; forecast to grow to nearly 2m in 2017 and 2.75m in 2022
  • ­   more than 1 in 4 further education colleges teaching international students outside of the UK
  • ­   many UK operators already provide education products and services successfully in a range of countries across the globe

 In order to help articulate and promote the UK’s education and training offer to an international audience, UKTI Education is preparing a snapshot of the UK’s education and training capabilities, for publication on their website and in future sector prospectuses.  They would like to invite you to contribute examples to their growing library of case studies showcasing what the UK can offer international customers.  They would also welcome your input into their short survey of UK sector capabilities.  If you would like to participate, please complete the form (UKTI case study form) and return to joanne.irving@uktispecialist.com by Friday, 29th November 2013.

Text from UKTI call: We will presume that by sending us your case studies we have your consent to use and, where necessary, edit them for the purposes of publication.  We will, however, share final versions of your case studies with you before we start to use them for promotional activity. We may require additional information from you and may contact you to discuss your response further; when completing the form, please provide the name of a person who is able to provide this information.

LOVE your drafts, DON’T delete them, ADD them to BRIAN!

open access logo, Public Library of ScienceDon’t delete your drafts!  You will hear this A LOT over the next couple of years as the open access movement gathers even more momentum and the role of green open access and institutional repositories is moved to the fore of the next REF (likely to be REF 2020).  HEFCE’s consultation on open access and the post-2014 REF closed last week and, although the results are not due out until early next year, it is highly expected that most of the proposals will go ahead.  This is likely to result in significant changes to how research papers are published and the full-text is made freely available.

Key changes likely to happen are:

  • All journal papers and conference proceedings submitted to the next REF will have to be freely available in BURO from the point of acceptance/publication (subject to publisher’s embargo periods).
  • A journal paper / conference proceeding that was not made freely available in BURO from the point of acceptance/publication will not be eligible to be submitted, even if it is made available retrospectively.
  • The version made available in BURO should be the final accepted version but does not have to be the publisher’s PDF.
  • This is likely to be applicable for outputs published from 2016 onwards.

It is excellent to see the Funding Councils promoting the open access agenda and embedding it within the REF.  Making outputs freely available increases their visibility and is likely to increase their impact, not only within the academic community but in the public sphere too.  It ensures research is easily accessible to our students, politicians and policy-makers, charities and businesses and industry, as well as to potential collaborators in other countries which can help with building networks and the internationalisation of research.

Talking to academic colleagues around the University it is apparent that the normal practice is to delete previous drafts, including the final accepted version, as soon as a paper is approved for publication.   This needs to change!  Many publisher’s will already allow you to add the final accepted version of your paper to BURO (just not the version with the publisher’s header, logo, etc) and this is set to increase in light of the HEFCE consultation.  Rather than deleting the final version, add it to BRIAN so it will be freely available to everyone in the institutional repository, BURO.

We need to get into the habit now of doing this now.  BRIAN is linked to the Sherpa-Romeo database of journals so you can easily check the archiving policy of the journal.  All you need to do is:

1. Log into your BRIAN account and find the paper.

2. One of the tabs is named ’full text’.

3. If you click into this tab you will see a link near the Sherpa-Romeo logo to check your ‘publisher’s policy’.

4. Click on this and you will see the archiving policy for this particular journal, clearly stating which version of the paper can be uploaded. Ideally you are looking for your journal to be a green journal which allows the accepted version or (even better but quite rare, unless you have paid extra to make it freely available) the publisher’s version/PDF. See the screen shot. 

5. Click ‘back’ and then click on the ‘full text’ tab again and you will see a link (in a blue box) to ‘upload new file for this publication’.

6. Upload the file and follow the onscreen instructions.

7. Your full text will then automatically feed through to BURO and be available open access in the next few days.

 

In point 4 I mentioned about paying extra to the publisher at the point of acceptance to make it freely available upon publication.  This is often referred to as the gold route to open access publishing and at BU we have a central dedicated budget for paying these fees.  You can find out about the GOLD route to open access publishing here: Gold route

So the overriding message is:

LOVE YOUR DRAFTS – DON’T DELETE THEM – ADD THEM TO BRIAN!

 

 

 

CMMPH PhD students steal the show at the GLOW maternal health conference

The second Global Women’s Health Conference, held in Birmingham on November 1st, highlighted the work that still needs to be done to reduce maternal mortality. Prof Wendy Graham from the University of Aberdeen opened the conference outlining the progress to date but reminding us that there was much still to do. Her hard hitting presentation showed the unacceptable conditions of birthing rooms in many countries. She urged the audience to remember that “we do not want universal health care of poor quality.”

Rachel Arnold

This was followed by a short film produced by BU Visiting Professor Gwyneth Lewis, which tells the story of Mrs X and why she died in childbirth.

A number of presenters highlighted hospital conditions and disrespectful staff as a disincentive for women in seeking facility birth. However, Rachel Arnold, PhD student in CMMPH,  reminded the audience that the carers were women too. She noted that it is all too easy to blame health care professionals, forgetting the challenging conditions that they have to work in. In her excellent and moving presentation Rachel presented quotes from midwives and doctors in Afghanistan that brought a number of audience members to tears.

BU Prof Vanora Hundley presented work from Pakistan evaluating a decision tool to support policy makers and programme managers who are considering the potential role of clean birth kits in their strategy for care at birth.

Sheeta;

Sheetal Sharma

While PhD student Sheetal Sharma’s poster presentation Getting women to care in Nepal: A Difference in Difference analysis of a health promotion intervention stole the day winning best poster prize.   Sheetal has a unique international supervisory team led by BU and her PhD is supported by Bournemouth University with a studentship and a Santander grant.

The event was also an opportunity to publicise next year’s international conference on Midwifery and the post-MDG agenda, which will be held at Bournemouth University.

BU well represented at Global Women’s (GLOW) Research Conference

 

At tomorrow’s Global Women’s (GLOW) Research Conference at the University of Birmingham BU’s Centre for Midwifery, Maternal & Perinatal Health is very well presented.  Prof. Vanora Hundley presents her poster Clean Birth Kits to promote safe childbirth, which reports the views of policy makers and district health officers in Pakistan regarding the potential for CBKs to facilitate clean birth practices.

 

PhD student Sheetal Sharma also presents a poster on her thesis under the title: Getting women to care in Nepal: A Difference in Difference analysis of a health promotion intervention.  Sheetal’s work is supervised by BU Professors Edwin van Teijlingen and Vanora Hundley, BU Senior Lecturer in Midwifery Catherine Angell, BU Visiting Fellow Dr. Padam Simkhada (ScHARR, University of Sheffield) and Dr. Elisa Sicuri from CRESIB (Barcelona Centre for International Health Research) in Spain and Prof. José M. Belizán from IECS (Institute for Clinical Effectiveness and Health Policy) in Argentina.  Sheetal’s PhD evaluates a community-based health promotion intervention in Nepal which aims to improve the uptake of maternity care.  The intervention is sponsored by the London-based Buddhist charity Green Tara Trust (see: http://www.greentaratrust.com/ ).

 

Whilst PhD student Rachel Arnold will give an oral presentation of her PhD research under the title:  Afghan women: a qualitative study of the culture of care in an Afghan maternity hospital.   This PhD, supervised by BU Professors Immy Holloway and Edwin van Teijlingen and BU Visiting Professor Kath Ryan (La Trobe University, Australia), analyses the culture of care within a maternity hospital in the Afghan capital Kabul and examines the perspectives of midwives, doctors and cleaners on their role and care within that hospital. In a country striving to reduce the high rate of maternal mortality the provision of quality intrapartum care for women in Kabul’s maternity hospitals is vital.

 

BU Professors Vanora Hundley and Edwin van Teijlingen will also take the opportunity at the GLOW conference to promote the forthcoming BU conference on what will happen after the Millennium Development Goals in 2015 ‘Midwifery and the post MDG agenda’ (http://postmdgagenda-eorg.eventbrite.co.uk/ ).

 

Vanora Hundley is Professor of Midwifery

Edwin van Teijlingen is Professor of Reproductive Health Research

 

Congrats Courtney!

Courtney Lee, a Level H, BA Events and Leisure Marketing student has been appointed Social Media Manager for the Festival Impact Monitor.

Courtney brings a great deal of experience to the role. During her placement she worked for the Hong Kong Tourism board, where she worked within the organisation’s Trade Development Team  and also provided support with public relations. Courtney has already designed a comprehensive social media plan for the project which she will launch in early November. This includes the rechristening of the project as FestIM and the design of a logo. She will be accompanying the project’s Principal Investigator, Nigel Williams to key events and presentations to ensure that both the project’s live and virtual media are in sync and key messages are delivered across all the project’s media platforms.

Courtney is open to working with others interested in a social media role and would welcome enquiries from students wishing to be social media assistants.  Interested students should e-mail nferdinand@bournemouth.ac.uk.

The Festival Impact Monitor is funded by the BU Fusion Investment Fund. For more click on this link.

 

Decreasing spatial disorientation: towards dementia-friendly environments: A progress report

Spatial disorientation is among the earliest indicators of dementia, an increasingly common condition in our ageing society that currently costs the UK £23 billion annually. With support of the Fusion-CCCP strand we have created ViRtUOS (Virtual Reality User Orientation System), a state-of-the-art eye-tracking and virtual environments research platform which will facilitate the study of factors that affect spatial disorientation in people with dementia. Data gathered using ViRtUOS will be used to formulate design principles for dementia-friendly care homes, reducing care costs, and leading to new knowledge with significance and reach.

To develop ViRtUOS we have brought together undergraduate RAs from Computing, Creative Technology and Computer Animation to work co-operatively and as part of a high-level, well-resourced multi-disciplinary team.

This video demonstrates the results of their excellent work:

 CLICK HERE TO VIEW; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w1oo6JXWNuY

So far, this FIF project has been a great success and feedback from the students RAs suggests that they have enjoyed this unique student experience and that working in an inter-disciplinary team has helped them improve their skills.

Excerpts from students’ feedback:

“I enjoyed working on a project which is not exactly ordinary in my field, and working with people who come from different professional backgrounds. It was interesting to see how contrasting subjects tie into the same workflow to try and produce a coherent product. Personally, I am glad to take away new knowledge about my own study subject and the ones of my fellow colleagues; most of that knowledge I will surely apply in my last year of study.” Jurate Pozeraite (Computer Animation, Media School)

“I’ve learnt a lot in my time here, which will be invaluable for both my final year project and my future career. I’ve learnt not only about software development, but about modelling, developing reliable systems, working as a team to produce a joint system and error handling and bug fixing. I feel that working with other students, in a similar position to myself, really helped me in this project. They made me feel at ease and they helped me learn about their roles in developing this system, which otherwise I would have completely ignored. Overall I feel that for me personally this was a very worthwhile project, for expanding my experience and learning something new. I would love to continue my work with this project for as long as possible.” William Chappell (Computing, DEC)

“During the full length of the project I had learnt more and more, I think that this was the best opportunity I have had in a long time. This job gave me lots of experience with people from different schools, which have completely different perspectives. They are both brilliant in their profession and I have learned a lot from them. Also I hope they have learned some things from me. Generally, I have gained new skills including working with ‘Vizard 4.0’ software and ‘3DsMax’. In fact, the project was really interesting and I was glad to not only earn experience from it but also produce a good quality product at the end. Overall I am very happy that I get a chance to work with such a wonderful team. It was a great experience that improves my skills for future projects. If I had a chance to go back in time and redo this project again I will definitely do it.” Arkadiusz Szerszmidt (Creative Technology, DEC)

 We believe that ViRtUOS has great potential to also foster other inter-disciplinary collaborations within BU and we would like to invite academics and students from across BU to get in contact with us, visit the laboratory and explore its potential for their research interests.

The further development of ViRtUOS will be driven by two PhD projects that started in October this year and we are planning to run first experiments investigating spatial orientation in people with dementia soon.

The team, from left to right: Arkadiusz Szerszmidt (undergraduate RA, Creative Technology), William Chappell (undergraduate RA Computing), Mary O’Malley (PhD student, Psychology & BUDI), Mariela Gaete-Reyes (BUDI), Jurate Pozeraite (undergraduate RA, Computer Animation), Chris Ramsey (PhD student, CDE), Jan Wiener (Psychology & BUDI)

 CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE VIDEO !!!

By Mariela Gaete-Reyes & Jan Wiener

One of the Most-Read articles from Post-Communist Economies journal!

Professor Jens Hölscher of the Business School’s article on ‘Wage inequality, labour market flexibility and duality in Eastern and Western Europe ’ has been recognised as one of the most-read articles from Post-Communist Economies Journal!

The article has been made FREE until the end of May 2014 and you can access it here.

Celebrate International Open Access Week – the GREEN route!

open access logo, Public Library of ScienceThis week is International Open Access Week.  Now in its 6th year, this global awareness week aims to promote open access as a new norm for scholarship and research.  Research shows that making your research freely available dramatically increases the number of citations and leads to more people downloading the research papers, this increasing the academic and societal impact of your research.

The green route to open access is where a version of the paper is self-archived in a repository, such as our institutional repository BURO.  This process relies on researchers uploading their own papers.  Repositories offer a number of benefits.  They increase the availability of some published journal works with restrictions on reprinting or text mining, and may enable work to be propogated across the internet and used for novel applications. Repositories also allow authors to keep track of who is downloading their data.

BU has had an institutional repository since 2007 which contains full-text versions of outputs by BU authors.  This provides an excellent showcase of our research outputs to our students as well as making them freely available to a global audience.  You can upload the full-text of your output via BRIAN:

1. Log into your account and find the paper.

2. One of the tabs is ‘full text’.

3. If you click into this tab you will see a link near the Sherpa-Romeo logo to check your ‘publisher’s policy’.

4. Click on this and you will see the archiving policy for this particular journal, clearly stating which version of the paper can be uploaded.

5. Click ‘back’ and then click on the ‘full text’ tab again and you will see a link (in a blue box) to ‘upload new file for this publication’.

6. Upload the file and follow the onscreen instructions.

7. Your full text will then automatically feed through to BURO and be available open access in the next few days.

Find out about the GOLD route to open access publishing here: Gold route

Celebrate International Open Access Week – the GOLD route!

open access logo, Public Library of ScienceThis week is International Open Access Week.  Now in its 6th year, this global awareness week aims to promote open access as a new norm for scholarship and research.  Research shows that making your research freely available dramatically increases the number of citations and leads to more people downloading the research papers, this increasing the academic and societal impact of your research.

The gold route to open access is considered at the moment to be the most sustainable method in the long term, and was recommended by the Finch report.  It involves publishing in a fully open access journal or website, or in a hybrid journal (i.e. the paper appears in the traditional print journal and is freely available online).  Authors usually need to pay for their work to be published via this route.

BU has operated a central dedicated budget for open access payments via the gold route since April 2011.  The fund is open to all BU academics and PGRs, and you can find out how to apply here: BU Open Access Fund

Find out about the GREEN route to open access publishing tomorrow!

Last Minute 1-2-1 Appointments Available Today with Martin Pickard – 24th October!

If you feel you would benefit from a ‘face to face’ meeting with Martin  in relation to any bid/proposal you are currently working on please contact me Dianne Goodman Today!

Martin currently has the following appointments available on the 24th of October at the following times at Lansdowne Campus:

Morning

  • 10:45am – 11:30am

Afternoon

  • 14:45pm – 15:30pm

Appointments are approx 45 minutes long

.

Martin Pickard

With a career background in both Academia and Industry Dr. Martin Pickard of Grantcraft is a specialist in writing and supporting research grant applications and tenders as well as providing administrative and management support services for ongoing projects. During the last 20 years Martin has worked extensively across Europe with a large number of universities, and research institutes as well as industrial firms, ranging from small SME’s to major international companies.

Martin is providing individual 1-2-1 surgeries with any BU academic staff member and works individually and confidentiality with each Principal Investigator as the project is structured and prepared in order to optimize the application documentation from every aspect of the Funders perspective; guiding, steering and showing how to optimize the application throughout the bid process.

Academics at BU who have undertaken his guidance have stated:

 ‘his support and direction was invaluable – Martin gave me some pragmatic suggestions which really helped to shape the bid. His eye for detail made the document much easier to read and the message much clearer. I was very grateful for his input’  Assoc. Prof Heather Hartwell School of Tourism.

The process, although labour intensive, works; with a proven historical average success rates of close to 1 in 2 against norms of (1 in 8 to 1 in 10)

Book Now through me Dianne Goodman - Martin’s appointments are always popular.

 

Twenty years after the publication of Changing Childbirth, where are we now?

Twenty years after the publication of Changing Childbirth, an eminent panel of clinicians, politicians and consumer representatives assembled to review the legacy of this key Changing CHildbirthmaternity report. The session, funded by the Wellcome Trust, was held at the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists in London – an appropriate place given the balance of power at the time of the report.  BU Professors Vanora Hundley and Edwin van Teijlingen were invited to attend as part of the selected audience at the session.

The session started with the panel reminding the audience that maternity services prior to the publication of Changing Childbirth in the early 1990s were anything but women focused. Several speakers noted that this report was the first to put women at the centre of maternity care, and many of the recommendations regarding patient-centred care across the NHS followed on from it. As the president of the Royal College of Midwives (RCM) Lesley Page commented: “It was common sense, but hugely radical.”

Changing Childbirth was the government’s response to Sir Nicholas Winterton’s ground-breaking review of the maternity services (Health Select Committee report 1992). The review was unique in seeking views from women – as Nicholas Winterton noted, his Parliamentary committee also made history by letting women who came to give evidence breastfeed during the hearing.

Baroness Julia Cumberlege reflected on how she had been determined that the Health Select Committee report would not simply be another filed document but would have an impact. Twenty years on has the report had an impact? 

The discussions covered a wide-ranging number of maternity care issues at the time of Changing Childbirth’s conception, many of which are still issues today in the UK.  We’d like to highlight two of these issues where BU has made an academic contribution.  First, the observation that we need to be cautious in making assumptions about choices that women perceive they have in childbirth. Profs van Teijlingen and Hundley’s research has demonstrated that women often cannot envisage or value potential choices if these options don’t exist in their current environment.1,2   

The second BU contribution to the debate is around the closure of small maternity units. One of the panel members compared the centralisation of maternity services to that of banks and supermarkets.  A comparative study was published in 2010 by Prof. van Teijlingen and BU Visiting Fellow Dr. Emma Pitchforth under the title ‘Rural maternity care: Can we learn from Wal-Mart?’.

Overall the panel was positive about the legacy of Changing Childbirth – that is, a more humanised maternity services. However, all present expressed disappointment at the failure of the NHS to introduce continuity of carer, something that women who gave evidence stated they valued highly. As Nicholas Winterton said: “We have made progress but we should be making further progress – It is unfinished business.”

Vanora Hundley is Professor of Midwifery

Edwin van Teijlingen is Professor of Reproductive Health Research

 References:

  1. Hundley V, Ryan M and Graham W (2001) Assessing women’s preferences for intrapartum care. Birth 28 (4): 254-263.
  2. van Teijlingen E, Hundley V, Rennie AM, Graham W, Fitzmaurice A. (2003) Maternity satisfaction studies and their limitations: “What is, must still be best”, Birth 30: 75-82.  
  3. van Teijlingen ER and Pitchforth E. (2010) Rural maternity care: Can we learn from Wal-Mart? Health & Place 16: 359-364.

 

 

 

Book Now! A Few Spaces left on the 24th of OCT for your 1-2-1 appointment with Martin Pickard – a great opportunity to improve your bid proposals

If you feel you would benefit from a ‘face to face’ meeting with Martin  in relation to any bid/proposal you are currently working on please contact me Dianne Goodman ASAP with your time preferences.

Martin currently has some availablity on these dates between the following times:

  • 24th September 2013, 9:15am- 5pm (Lansdowne Campus )

Appointments are approx 45 minutes long. You will also have unlimited telephone and email support to progress your application after meeting with Martin.

Martin Pickard

With a career background in both Academia and Industry Dr. Martin Pickard of Grantcraft is a specialist in writing and supporting research grant applications and tenders as well as providing administrative and management support services for ongoing projects. During the last 20 years Martin has worked extensively across Europe with a large number of universities, and research institutes as well as industrial firms, ranging from small SME’s to major international companies.

Martin is providing individual 1-2-1 surgeries with any BU academic staff member and works individually and confidentiality with each Principal Investigator as the project is structured and prepared in order to optimize the application documentation from every aspect of the Funders perspective; guiding, steering and showing how to optimize the application throughout the bid process.

Academics at BU who have undertaken his guidance have stated:

 ‘his support and direction was invaluable – Martin gave me some pragmatic suggestions which really helped to shape the bid. His eye for detail made the document much easier to read and the message much clearer. I was very grateful for his input’  Assoc. Prof Heather Hartwell School of Tourism.

The process, although labour intensive, works; with a proven historical average success rates of close to 1 in 2 against norms of (1 in 8 to 1 in 10)

Book Now through me Dianne Goodman - Martin’s appointments are always popular.

 

Latest Major Funding Opportunities

The following opportunities have been announced. Please follow the links for more information:

  • The AHRC has a call for Expressions of Interest to present virtual exhibitions of images on their website. Maximum funding: £4,000. Closing date: 29/11/13
  • The AHRC Creative Economy Showcase 2014 requires Expressions of Interest. Award maximum not specificed> Closing date 27/11/13
  • AHRC has announced the Cultural Value Project Targeted Call for Critical Reviews and Research Development Awards and Expressions of Interest to deliver Expert workshops. Maximum grant £100,000 and £10,000 respectively. Closing date 7/11/13
  • Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) / Royal Society of Edinburgh Enterprise Fellowships aim to increase exploitation of ideas with commercial potential from BBSRC supported research. Maximum award not specified. Closing date: 28/11/13
  • The BBSRC is offering FAPESP Pump-Priming Awards (FAPPA). Maximum grant £35,000. No closing date but applications must be made at least 12 weeks before the proposed start of the project
  • Supporting international collaboration, BBSRC-Brazil (FAPESP) are joint funding research. Maximum grant not specified. Closing date: 8/01/14
  • Similarly the BBSRC’s Other Countries Partnering Awards supports long-term collaborations. Maximum grant not specified. Closing date: 27/11/13
  • The BBSRC call for Resolving Technological and Methodological Gaps in Metagenomics is open. Maximum award not specified. Closing date: 8/01/14
  • British Academy is offering postdoctoral fellowships to foreign researchers. Maximum award not specified. Closing date: 5/12/13
  • The EPSRC is inviting applications for access to ARCHER through its resource allocation panel. Top-up applications are also accepted. Maximum award not specified. Closing date: 18/12/13
  • EPSRC, as part of the RCUK Energy Programme, invites proposals for collaborative research projects to undertake fundamental research to tackle challenges in carbon capture for carbon capture and storage (CCS). Maximum award not specified. Closing date: 29/11/13
  • Healthcare Technology Cooperatives partnership awards are beign supported by the EPSRC/NIHR. Maximum award £150,000. Closing date: 7/01/14
  • ESRC is launching the second round of the ESRC Transformative Research Call. Maximum grant £200,000. Closing date: 15/01/14
  • The ESRC Europe – China call for collaborative research on The Green Economy and Understanding Population Change has opened. Maximum grant not specified. Closing date: 3/12/13
  • The ESRC Celebrating Impact Prize is an annual opportunity to recognise and reward the successes of ESRC-funded researchers. Maximum ward £20,000. Closing date: 22/11/13
  • ERA-NET Plus on Climate Smart Agriculture - under the ERA-NET Plus action “Climate Smart Agriculture: Adaptation of agricultural systems in Europe” co-funded by the Seventh Framework Programme (FP7) of the European Commission, there is a call for pre-proposals relating to the adaptation of European agriculture to climate change in its broad sense. Maximum grant not specified. Closing date: 2/12/13
  • The Leverhulme Trust is supporting Major Research Fellowships in the Humanities and Social Sciences. Maximum award not specified. Closing date: 8/05/14
  • The Leverhulme-Royal Society Africa Award for scientists who want to develop a collaborative research project between the UK and research institutions in either Ghana or Tanzania has been announced. Maximum award £210,000. Closing date: 15/01/14
  • The MRC has opened the Health systems research initiative call 1: Providing evidence to strengthen health systems and improve health outcomes. Grant maximum not specified. Closing date:  14/01/14
  • NERC have announced their ESPA Fellowships. Maximum award £200,000. Closing date: 20/11/13 
  • The Royal Academy of Engineering has announced The Leverhulme Trust Senior Research Fellowships Scheme. Maximum award not specificed. Closing date: 18/11/13
  • Royal Society Wolfson Research Merit Award provides universities with additional support to enable them to recruit or retain respected scientists of outstanding achievement and potential to the UK. Maximum grant not specified. Closing date: 12/11/13
  • Royal Society Leverhulme Trust Senior Research Fellowship reimburses the employing institution with the full salary cost of a teaching replacement. The scheme covers all areas of the life and physical sciences, including engineering, but excluding clinical medicine. Award not specified. Closing date 8/01/14
  • The Agri-Tech Catalyst, run by the Technology Strategy Board and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, offers funding to innovative businesses and researchers to develop solutions to global agricultural challenges. see detials on the Early Stage and Late Stage awards. Grant not specified. Registration by 4/12/13 and submit by 11/12/13
  • Also via the TSB’s Agri-Tech Catalyst, there are Industrial research awards. Maximum grant £3,000,000. Registration by 4/12/13. Submission by 11/12/13
  • The TSB has announced their Innovative Research Call – IRC 2013 – Detection of explosives and weapons. Maximum grant £950,000. Registration by  27/11/13. Submission  by 4/12/13
  • The TSB and Medical Research Council programme is offering funding to innovative small and medium sized businesses (SMEs) and researchers to develop solutions to healthcare challenges via their Biomedical Catalyst – Feasibility studies call. Maximum funding £200,000. Registration by 5/02/14. Submission by 12/02/14
  • Also through the TSB’s Biomedical Catalyst, funding is available via the Early and late stage awards. Maximum award not specified. Register by 5/2/14 and submit by 12/2/14
  • The TSB is making an investment of up to £2.5m in collaborative R&D projects that lead to the creation of  ‘frictionless’ digital transactional environments. Register by 13/11/13 and submit by 20/11/13 
  • The Toshiba Fellowship Programme is a unique opportunity for recently qualified PhD level scientists, mainly from science, computing and mathematics disciplines. Maximum award not specified. Closing date: 6/12/13
  • The Wellcome Trust is offering Senior Investigator Awards in Medical HumanitiesNew Investigator Awards in Medical HumanitiesSenior Investigator Awards in Society and Ethics, New Investigator Awards in Society and Ethics.  Maximum award £1,000,000. Closing date: 21/03/14
  • Pathfinder Awards are being offered by The Wellcome Trust. These provide pilot funding for Academic-Industry partnerships to develop early-stage applied research and development projects in orphan and neglected disease areas. Maximum grant £100,000. Closing date: 9/01/14
  •  The Wellcome Trust’s Translational Medicine and Therapeutics Programmes – this flagship scheme has established four high-quality integrated research training programmes for clinicians in translational medicine and therapeutics. Maximum award not specified. No closing date.
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Poland and the Eurozone Conference, 19th & 20th September 2013 – what a success!

The Bournemouth University Business School hosted the conference “Poland and Eurozone” on 19-20 September, 2013. The conference was the initiative of Professor Jens Hӧlscher, head of the department of Accounting, Finance and Economics of Bournemouth University (BU). 

The conference was opened by Professor Matthew Bennett, Pro-Vice-Chancellor at BU, who greeted the participants of the conference, wished them success and scientific achievements. He expressed the hope that the conference would provide a platform to discuss and address the relevant issues and to initiate new joint research projects.

Following a short welcoming speech by Professor Jens Hӧlscher, Professor Iraj Hashi from Staffordshire University was invited to briefly introduce Professor Leszek Balcerowicz’s biography to the participants of the conference. Professor Iraj Hashi highlighted that Professor Leszek Balcerowicz was the former Deputy Prime Minister, Minister of Finance of Poland and the chairman of the National Bank of Poland, who is particularly famous for implementing the Polish economic transformation program in the 1990s, a shock therapy, which is commonly referred to as the Balcerowicz Plan.

In his keynote presentation Professor Leszek Balcerowicz focused on the issues relevant to the Euro problems and their possible solutions. Following the presentation Professor Victoria Chick from University College London initiated the discussion on the Professor Leszek Balcerowicz’s presentation and challenged his views.

The second day of the conference started with the keynote presentation of Professor Domenico Mario Nuti from La Sapie nza University (Rome) on The Euro Area: Premature, Diminished, Divergent, which was followed by the lead discussant Professor Steve Letza from BU.

Then the chair Professor Jenny Piesse from BU opened Session One on Income Developments. The session started with an interesting presentation by Professor Andy Mullineux from Bournemouth University on The ‘Eurozone’ Crisis: Escaping the Doom Loop.’ The session was continued by the presentation of Professor Horst Tomann from Free University of Berlin on External Imbalances in the European Monetary Union: the Case for Keynesian Income Policy and was finished by the presentation of Dr George Filis and Professor Steve Letza from BU on Business Cycles Synchronisation between the European Union and Poland.

Following the buffet lunch, where the participants of the conference discussed the presentations Professor Allan Webster (BU) opened Session Two on Monetary Aspects. Rob Hayward form the University of Brighton and Jens Hӧlscher started the session with their presentation on Crash Risk and the Carry Trade: An Analysis of Uncovered Interest Parity in CEE and CIS. The session was continued by the Professor Karsten Staehr from Tallin University of Technology & Estonia Eesti Bank on Beating the Maastricht Price Stability Criterion to Join the Eurozone: Challenges and Options. Following the presentation by Zbigniew Polanski from National Bank of Poland on Poland During the Global Crisis: “A Green Island” approaching the Eurozone the chair of the session Professor Allan Webster announced to start the discussions on the presentations of Session Two.

Following a short coffee and tea break Professor Steve Letza opened Session Three on Firms’ Behaviour. Malgorzata Pawlowska from National Bank of Poland presented her research on the Impact of Foreign Capital on Competition and Concentration in the Polish Banking Sector. The second presentation of the session was given by Professor Tomasz Mickiewicz from Aston University, where he introduced his research on Is Poland A Nation of Entrepreneurs?

A conference Gala Dinner at the Russell-Cotes Art Gallery and Museum, Bournemouth, was a pleasant completion of the conference. In an informal atmosphere participants continued to discuss various interesting issues raised during the conference, made contacts and thanked the organisers for the well-planned scientific event.

Written by,

Khurshid Djalilov, kdjalilov@bournemouth.ac.uk, member of EACES

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