Tagged / FMC

Bill Douglas Stipend Awarded to CEMP

bill-douglas-cinema-museum-exeter1CEMP’s Professor Julian McDougall has been awarded the Bill Douglas Cinema Museum Research Stipend.

The Bill Douglas Cinema Museum at the University Exeter, UK is both a public museum and a rich research resource for scholars of moving image history. The museum is named after the renowned filmmaker Bill Douglas and was founded on the extraordinary collection of material he put together with his friend Peter Jewell. In the twenty years since its opening, the museum has received donations from many sources and now has over 75,000 artefacts on the long history of the moving image from the seventeenth century to the present day.

The stipend enables the recipient to access collections at the museum to undertake significant research that will generate publication or other demonstrable outcomes and a blog post for the museum¹s website about the research.

Julian’s project is ‘Comrades and Curators’: this research seeks to trace the importance of multiple third spaces constructed in and around Comrades, hitherto not conceptualized as such by either Douglas, film commentators or academics. Related directly to the Bill Douglas Cinema Museum’s stated areas of significance, the research will explore the relationship between Comrades as a film text, the curation of the director’s collection of magic lanterns and other optical artifacts, the situating of lanternist as pivotal to the representation of social history in the film and the curation of this social history in museums in Tolpuddle and Dorchester.

The research will be conducted between March and December 2017.

Three tales of sexual intrigue from Kip Jones

C4nQP3CXUAAICo9 ‘True confessions: Why I left a traditional liberal arts college for the sins of the Big City’ by Kip Jones has been published today in Qualitative Research Journal (QRJ)

Three tales of sexual intrigue from Kip Jones.  A story, a reminiscence, and a scene from a film.

By means of several auto-ethnographic stories (including a scene from a working script for a proposed film), the author interrogates numerous ideas and misconceptions about gay youth, both past and present. 

Being straight or being gay can be viewed within the wider culture’s need to set up a sexual binary and force sexual “choice” decision-making for the benefit of the majority culture. Through the device of the fleeting moment, this essay hopes to interrogate the certainties and uncertainties of the “norms” of modernity by portraying sexuality in youth.

Also available as a draft on Academia.edu