Tagged / performative social science

Ground-breaking article by Jones and Fenge

Kip Jones and Lee-Ann Fenge are pleased to announce that our article to appear shortly in Creative Approaches to Research, a peer-reviewed open-access journal, “Gift Stories How Do We Retell the Stories that Research Participants Give Us?” is now available on BRIAN.

We passionately believe that as narrative researchers and storytellers we must promote narrative in the content and styles of our publications. To revert to a style of publication or presentation that is counter to this does a disservice to our commitments as narrativists.

We can no longer afford to ignore the great advances made in representation of qualitative data. These have been overwhelmingly demonstrated by the successes achieved in auto-ethnography, poetic enquiry, ethno-drama, film, Performative Social Science and/or other arts-based efforts in research and dissemination.

 

Creative Writing for Academics Two-day Workshop

The Creative Writing for Academics Workshop with Kip Jones will take place at the Executive Business Centre 20th & 21 April, 2017.

Writing

The last workshop filled up quickly.

Don’t wait too late to register. Do it today!

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Write your life story on a postcard

Chose one of 11 B&W photos and write 1,000 word story about it.

Share with others who chose the same photo.

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Just a few of the exciting writing exercises that take place over the two days.

Writing quotes

 

 

 

 

Creative Writing

Three tales of sexual intrigue from Kip Jones

C4nQP3CXUAAICo9 ‘True confessions: Why I left a traditional liberal arts college for the sins of the Big City’ by Kip Jones has been published today in Qualitative Research Journal (QRJ)

Three tales of sexual intrigue from Kip Jones.  A story, a reminiscence, and a scene from a film.

By means of several auto-ethnographic stories (including a scene from a working script for a proposed film), the author interrogates numerous ideas and misconceptions about gay youth, both past and present. 

Being straight or being gay can be viewed within the wider culture’s need to set up a sexual binary and force sexual “choice” decision-making for the benefit of the majority culture. Through the device of the fleeting moment, this essay hopes to interrogate the certainties and uncertainties of the “norms” of modernity by portraying sexuality in youth.

Also available as a draft on Academia.edu

Creative Writing for Academics with Kip Jones

Recently Updated19Creative Writing for Academics with Kip Jones

Workshop

Thursday 20 & Friday 21 April 2017 
Executive Business Centre, Bournemouth, UK

Workshop objectives:

  •  Have more of your work read by wider audiences; in other words, impact.
  •  By providing an intense two-day experience the playing field is levelled and opportunities for facilitated learning developed.
  •  By engaging in creative writing, it becomes possible for all to write more clearly, more simply, even more creatively, when writing not only for academic publications, but also for outlets previously unimagined.

The workshop will take place at the BU Executive Business Centre, 7th Floor. Thursday, 20 April and Friday, 21 April 2017

Workshop Price: £175. For two days of activities. The price includes lunch and refreshments and all class materials. Accommodation and travel costs are not included.

Register online: http://creative-writing-2017.eventbrite.co.uk

This unique event isn’t a typical ‘writing retreat’ (with trees to hug and lots of time to ruminate), but a very active experience with exercises, suggestions and supportive feedback on participants’ work from Kip Jones and other participants.

Students and academics will be encouraged to include more creative writing in their outputs, particularly those whose writing includes reporting on narrative and other qualitative methods of research.

The workshop will also help with publishing in the wider world of blogs and online outlets, moving work to media and film, auto-ethnography and even fiction.

Methods: The workshop presents opportunities to work with academic material and expand its means of production and dissemination to new and creative levels through interfaces with techniques from the arts and humanities, including:

  •  Blog and magazine writing
  •  Film treatments and scripts
  • Poetry and fictional exercises.

    P1020069 copy  Response from the Previous Workshop:

  • “I enjoyed the freedom that came from writing creatively, without prescriptions. Having no other goal than the story/ poem itself was intimidating initially, but then turned into an amazing experience”.
  • “It was wonderful to meet academics interested in creative writing”
  • “The psychological and physical space to write”
  • “I really liked the focus and mix of activities/exercises and writing time”
  • “The pace was gentle & focused, allowing & facilitating different approaches”

Report from the previous workshop

Chapter on Ethics in Film by Kip Jones published by Routledge

Written by leading international scholars from the main contributing perspectives and disciplines, The Routledge International Handbook on Narrative and Life History seeks to capture the range and scope as well as the considerable complexity of the field of narrative study and life history work by situating these fields of study within the historical and contemporary context.

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Relishing the chance to cite not only C.E. Scott from The Question of Ethics Nietzsche, Foucault, Heidegger, but also Norma Desmond from Sunset Strip, Jones said, “The Handbook was a welcomed chance, once and for all, to sort the subtleties of ethical considerations in arts-based research approaches such as film”.  Jones is joined in the Handbook‘s discussion on Ethics  by such luminaries as Arthur Frank, Laurel Richardson, Caroline Ellis, and Norman Denzin.

Jones’ Chapter is available now on Brian and Academia.edu and the Handbook will shortly be in the BU Libraries.

 

CQR Members Delight Norwegian Visitors—“a very memorable experience”

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Norwegian visitors and CQR Members share results of arts-based research efforts at HSS. (Photos: Anne Quinney)

Five Members of BU’s Centre for Qualitative Research (Lee-Ann Fenge; Caroline Ellis-Hill; Maggie Hutchings; Michele Board; Anne Quinney) wowed recent visitors to FHSS from Sogn og Jordane University College in Norway. The College is based in the Sogn og Fjordane University College (Førde, Norway) which is currently situated on two campuses in Forde and Songdal on the west of Norway and on the longest and deepest Fjord in the world.

Each CQR member took a turn in presenting a short and sharp ten-minute demonstration by means of sharing the outputs of an arts-based qualitative project. These included:

  1. Ephemera workshop—sharing life stories via personal objects
  2. Seen but Seldom Heard –short video screening of a poetry project with disabled youth
  3. HeART of Stroke Project—sharing of a painting project for Stroke patients
  4. Meaning of Home photo project – sharing of photo book of baby boomers’ recollections of home
  5. Methods to Diversity—sharing and distribution of Method Deck of cards to encourage LGBT and ageing awareness
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Various arts-based projects shared with Norwegian visitors. (Photos: Anne Quinney)

A screening of the award-winning, research-based short film, RUFUS STONE, then followed the five short presentations. The visiting scholars remarked that they were very moved by the film. Overall, they appreciated the nuances in the use of arts-based approaches to create as well as disseminate research projects.

CQR is known internationally as a hub of excellence in Performative Social Science, a theoretically based approach to using tools from the arts and humanities in researching and/or disseminating a wide variety of health and social science topics.

One team member remarked, “On reflection, many of the messages from the six presentations overlapped, and so we created a very coherent and deep forum by means of hands-on sharing of objects”.

Another said, “There was a real buzz in the room and the event proved a great showcase for focusing on the strengths, power, magic, beauty, depth, richness of the many and varied CQR activities”.

Elizabeth Rosser, HSS’ Deputy Dean for Education and Professional Practice, who organised the three day visit to BU, summed up the Norwegians’ response: “They were MOST impressed and felt they gained considerably from the meeting with the Centre for Qualitative Research members”.

Visitors from Norway:

  1. Dr Anne-Grethe Halding: Associate Professor, Head of Department of Health Studies
  2. Professor Maj-Britt Raholm: Professor of Nursing
  3. Dr Anne Marie Sandvoll: Head of Postgraduate Education, Faculty of Health Studies
  4. Dr Aud Marie Øien: Research lead, Faculty of Health Studies
  5. Dr Eli Natvik: Early Career researcher and academic recently commenced at the University College from clinical practice as a physiotherapist.

Stay in touch with CQR on:

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/groups/54608373386/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/BUQualitative

CQR website: https://research.bournemouth.ac.uk/centre/centre-for-qualitative-research/

 

Creative Writing for Academics with Kip Jones

Creative writing

Summary: The Creative Writing workshop will be a unique event in that it will not be a typical ‘writing retreat’ (with trees to hug and lots of time to ruminate), but rather a very active experience with lots of exercises, suggestions and supportive feedback on participants’ work from Kip Jones and other participants.  The point is to encourage both students and academics who would like to include more creative writing in their outputs, particularly those whose writing includes reporting on narrative and other qualitative methods of research.  It also helps immensely in the move to publishing in the wider world of blogs and online outlets, moving work to media and film, auto-ethnography and even fiction.

Justification: The important point of Creative Writing for Academics is to help academics and students achieve the goal of achieving more of their work read by wider audiences; in other words, impact. By providing an intense two-day experience for participants to engage in developing writing skills, the playing field is levelled and opportunities for facilitated learning developed. By engaging in creative writing, it becomes possible for all to write more clearly, more simply, even more creatively, when writing not only for academic publications, but also for outlets previously unimagined.

Methods: The workshop will present opportunities to work with academic material and expand its means of production and dissemination to new and creative levels through interfaces with techniques from the arts and humanities, including blog and magazine writing, film treatments and scripts, and poetry and fictional exercises. These intellectual exchanges encourage joint exploration of how researchers can engage with principles and tools from the arts in order to expand and extend the possibilities of dissemination of research data. Concepts of creativity itself will evolve and be transformed by participants’ outlooks and willingness to engage with unfamiliar territory. These processes comprise a ‘facilitated learning’—in that knowledge will be gained as a secondary goal through a process of developing new relationships through small group problem-solving and self examination, grounded in personal past experience and knowledge.

12115534_10153710964944855_4944742169117744163_nKip Jones BA MSc PhD is Reader in Performative Social Science and Qualitative Research in the Faculties of Media & Communication and Health & Social Sciences at Bournemouth University. Jones has produced films, videos and audio productions and has written many articles for academic journals and authored Chapters in books on topics such as masculinity, ageing and rurality, and older LGBT citizens. His groundbreaking use of qualitative methods, including biography and auto-ethnography, and the use of tools from the arts in social science research and dissemination, are distinguished internationally.

Workshop Price: £120. for two days. £90. for students/BU staff

Academics and students at all levels welcome!

Register online at: 

http://creative-writing-workshop.eventbrite.co.uk

“Styles of Good Sense” Ethics, Filmmaking and Scholarship

Crew shooting early scene for the short, research-based film, RUFUS STONE

Crew shooting early scene for the short, research-based film, RUFUS STONE

Kip Jones’ draft Chapter for The Routledge International Handbook on Narrative and Life History was deposited today on BRIAN and Academia.edu. The book’s section on Ethics is edited by Ivor Goodson, with assistance from Ari Antikainen, Molly Andrews and Pat Sikes. Jones’ Chapter entitled, “Styles of Good Sense—Ethics, Filmmaking and Scholarship” is based upon his experience as researcher, author and producer of the award winning short film, RUFUS STONE.

Jones proposes that aesthetics and ethics need to be considered in concert and that they are at the very heart of arts-based research. Ethics and Aesthetics become intertwined and support one another. Jones states:

‘Ethics, much like aesthetics, is often misunderstood as something effusive, illusive and somehow, decision-making by the few on a rarefied echelon, involving pronouncements of grand moral impact and/or sophisticated discrimination. For these kinds of reasons and to avoid potential headaches, it is often assumed that checklists and committees will be far better at making such decisions than mere individuals.’

Jones believes that ethics and aesthetics need to remain the prerogative of the researcher/filmmaker and her/his participants and audiences. By developing a trust in instinct and intuition and the naturally expressive and moral potential of our personal resources, research involving people’s stories can become richer and more human, if we only are willing to jettison some of the baggage of the old academic rigor and dry procedural ethics.

Jones’ involvement in the section of the book on Ethics will include co-contributors Arthur Frank, Norm Denzin, Laurel Richardson and Carolyn Ellis, and will be published in the New Year.

 

 

RUFUS STONE shortlisted for AHRC Research in Film Award

Kip Rufus location

The research-based biopic RUFUS STONE has just been shortlisted for the AHRC Research in Film Anniversary Prize for best AHRC funded film since 1998.

A central strand of the activities taking place throughout 2015 to mark the AHRC’s tenth anniversary, the awards attracted nearly 200 entries across the five categories.

The awards are designed to recognise the creative and innovative work being undertaken at the interface between research and film by world-leading researchers, practitioners and filmmakers in the UK arts and humanities research community.

RUFUS STONE was based on three years of research on older LGBT citizens living in south west England and Wales. The research team was led by Kip Jones and included Lee-Ann Fenge and Rosie Read on the team.

Bournemouth’s Kip Jones acted as Author and Executive Producer, with Josh Appignanesi directing the film. RUFUS STONE was produced by Parkville Pictures, London.

More information on the research and film-making

Watch the film here.

“A Breath of Fresh AiR”

The Bournemouth University ARTS in Research Collaborative (AiR) held a two-day workshop in late summer to experiment with interviewing, narrative and ephemera, and arts-based representations of such approaches (reported here previously). An article available online from today in The Qualitative Report by Kip Jones entitled, “A Report on an Arts-led, Emotive Experiment in Interviewing and Storytelling” details the thinking behind this effort and the mechanisms put in place that contributed to the workshop’s success.

The paper reports on the two-day experimental workshop in arts‐led interviewing technique using ephemera to elicit life stories and then reporting narrative accounts back using creative means of presentation.

 Academics and students from across Departments at Bournemouth University told each other stories from their pasts based in objects that they presented to each other as gifts. Each partner then reported the shared story to the group using arts‐led presentation methods.

Narrative research and the qualitative interview are discussed. The conclusion is drawn that academics yearn to express the more emotive connections generated by listening to the stories of strangers.

The procedures followed for the two‐day workshop are outlined in order that other academics may also organize their own experiments in eliciting story using personal objects and retelling stories creatively.

Because the group wanted to take the impact of this experience further, AiR applied and was accepted to present the concept at the Social Research Association’s workshop ‘Creative Research Methods’ on 8 May at the British Library in London. The Collaborative is about to meet up to brainstorm ways in which to translate their experiences of the workshop into a more presentational one.

Anyone from across Departments, whether lecturer, researcher, student or faculty, is welcome to join the ARTS in Research Collaborative. Please contact Kip Jones if you are interested in joining or just want to know more about the Collaborative.

 This just in from Creative Quarter!

Ten ‘rules’ for being creative in producing research

Sage Publishes Kip Jones’ Ten ‘Rules’ for Being Creative in Producing Research

Sage Publications online presence, “Social Science Space” has published BU Kip Jones’ “Ten ‘Rules’ for Being Creative in Producing Research’ on its website.

Since the changing of the year seems to be the time for lists, top ten lists, etc., Jones decided to compile his about being creative whist producing cutting‐edge research. Jones warned, “Not for the faint‐hearted!” The list is available here.

Students and Academics with further interest in arts-based research and dissemination are welcome to join the Arts in Research (AiR) Collaborative. More information here.

 

 

Sage Publications’ Social Science Space features article by Kip Jones

 

Sage Publications disseminates important research across the social science disciplines around the world. For the second time, Sage’s on line presence, Social Science Space, features an article by Bournemouth University’s Kip Jones.

“(The Grand Theory of) Neo Emotivism” is Jones’ take on the current state of mind of many researchers globally wishing to connect to their research “subjects” as well as to their own emotions. The article first appeared on Jones’ blog, KIPWORLD, where it has been viewed nearly 900 times in less than a month. The article went live today as the lead article on Social Science Space.

“’Neo-emotivism’ is a concept Kip Jones describes as intentionally using emotional responses for academic ends in large part by drawing from non-traditional sources like art and literature for inspiration and even vocabulary”. Fashioned in a tongue-in-cheek way after 19th and 20th Century art manifestos, the article makes it’s case by highlighting examples from a range of resources, including singer Jeff Buckley, composer Max Richter, artist Kazimir Malevich and architect Zada Hadid.

Thoughts for the article initially emerged from Jones’ interactions with fellow BU academics at a recent ARTS in Research (AiR) two-day workshop at Bournemouth University. Jones was surprised and encouraged by faculty and students, not only from Health & Social Care, but also from Media, Design, Engineering and Computing and Tourism with a similar ache to connect emotionally with their subjects and to acknowledge the “first person” in their dialogues. His concept of the “Pre-REFaelites” materialised from that encounter.

The ARTS in Research (AiR) cross-Schools collaborative will hold an additional two days of workshops at the Lighthouse in Poole led by artist-in-residence, Hazel Evans, on 20th and 21st November. Faculty and students from across schools and from outside of the University are encouraged to join us for the two days of creative engagement. More info

Two-day ARTS in Research Workshop at the Lighthouse Centre for the Arts in Poole

Bournemouth University Centre for Qualitative Research and

ARTS in Research Collaborative

in co-operation with
The Lighthouse Poole’s Centre for the Arts
Centre of artistic excellence for live events, theatre, music, film & visual arts present:
Two-day Workshop 20 & 21 November, 2014
Developing Arts-based Approaches
to Academic Research  
With Hazel Evans, Artist-in-Residence at The Lighthouse
Established artist in Dorset, Hazel is a multi-disciplinary artist working with the themes of communication, journeys, interior and exterior landscapes of the body. Her storytelling theatre company ‘Valise Noire’, was established in 2011. “Words, musical scores and ink on paper fusing the past and present, inspire my illustrative and written work. I enjoy blending antiquity with contemporary, reality and fantasy, black and white. I respond to music in real time documenting the feelings and sounds by the visual landscaping of my illustrations, poems and live art. ” –Hazel Evans
Spend two days exploring the workspaces of living, breathing performers and artists with us at the Lighthouse!  You will have a tour of the facilities, then see and discuss Hazel’s installation in the gallery. With Hazel’s guidance, you will work on your own projects, beginning in text as a point-of-departure. You will explore working with your body, music and/or multi-media during the two days of activities.
Cost for the two-day workshop: £200.
Early-bird discount (by 31st October): £175.
Teas, coffees on arrival and mid-morning break plus choice of finger buffet lunch will be included in the price. The days will run from 9:30 am until 4 pm.
Academic staff and students are encouraged to apply for funding through their School’s training and/or enrichment schemes.

ARTS in Research (AiR) Collaborative: Two days of creative scholarship

Shared objects/stories of a past (click on photo to enlarge)

“I can’t remember ever attending such an inspiring ‘in house’ event “.

The newly formed ARTS in Research Collaborative recently held two days of exploration of biography and ways and means of expressing the stories of others creatively and ethically. The workshop was entitled, A Past/A Present” ARTS in Research (AiR) Workshop.

Using shared objects representing a time or event in each participant’s life, a ‘partner’ then created a five minute presentation of and from the storied materials. Participants in the two-days of exploration came from HSC, the Media School and DEC. Both faculty and postgrad students took part.

The brief was kept simple and instruction to a minimum. Organiser Kip Jones shared examples from his own work of finding ways and means of responding creatively to detailed data as well as time and material constraints. Other than that, participants engaged in a learning process through participation itself and the sharing of their experiences. The group has agreed to write up the encounter for a journal article.

 

  • “Thank you all for the incredible willingness to be inventive, creative and think/be  outside ‘the box'”.

  • “An illuminating two days of deep sharing. I was honoured to be there and look forward to more creative adventures together”.

  • “Inspiring. An artful and generative suspension of ‘normal’ activity”.

The ARTS in Research Collaborative’s next workshop is planned for November at The Lighthouse in Poole. Details to follow. It will be open to a wider audience and there will be a charge to attend, but BU faculty and students are encouraged to apply for training and/or development funding within their Schools.

ARTS in Research (AiR) still accepting new members!

AiR Workshop: telling stories (click on photo to enlarge)

 

 

“Handsome young men and shoes I’ll never wear”

Lots of ‘creativity’ in academia to report, at least according to two articles in recent international blogs.

The Creativity Post reports a playful interchange between Kip Jones (RUFUS STONE) and Patricia Leavy (Method Meets Art). Each scholar asked the other 20 Questions. The only requirement was NOT to talk about their work. In an article written by Jones and Leavy elsewhere (The Qualitative Report), Jones advises ‘not to live and work in silos, but let all parts of your lives flow in and out of each other’. In this spirit, Leavy and Jones discuss the personal in the Creative Post article and how it contributes to their innovative endeavors.

In another article in the Creative Quarter, Jones is interviewed by Bournemouth University  Media School’s Trevor Hearing about the making of the research-based, award-winning short biopic, RUFUS STONE. Jones admits that here too the personal became central to solidifying the characters for the film and how auto-ethnography played a role in creating the story.

Those with an interest in ARTS in Research (AiR) are welcome to join the collaboration now forming across Schools at BU. Both faculty and postgrad students welcome!  More information or contact Kip Jones.