Tagged / research seminar

CQR Lunchtime Seminar “Poetry as Research” Wed RLH 201 1pm

The Centre for Qualitative Research invites you to its continuing series of lunchtime seminars this Wednesday at 1 pm in RLH 201 for “Poetry as Research” “In Conversation” with Lee-Ann Fenge and Wendy Cutts.

This year’s theme is “LISTEN MAKE SHARE”. Each month two CQR members  present their experiences to the audience ‘in conversation’ with either Narrative Methods (listening to stories), Arts-based Research methods (making stories), or Dissemination methods (sharing stories).

The seminars will involve two conversants and plenty of opportunity for audience participation in listening, making, and sharing. Not lectures, the seminars consist of two presenters ‘In Conversation” about a topic or method. There will be no PPT, but plenty of time for audience interaction and feedback!

Come along and join ‘In Conversation’!

Wed. 1 pm RLH 201 “Poetry as Research” with Lee-Ann Fenge & Wendy Cutts

FHSS Research Seminars 2017-2018

The Faculty of Health and Social Sciences Research Seminar Series will be starting again soon.

We noted that the best attended seminars last year were those involving a range of presentations in a one hour slot. These bite-size selections of research topics were great in attracting an audience from across disciplines and created a fun, friendly atmosphere.

To build on this we will be running monthly Research Seminars with 2-3 presenters at each session. These seminars are open to everyone, so whether this is your first venture into research or you are a veteran researcher please feel free to come along and share your experiences.

Seminars will be held between 1 and 2pm at the Lansdowne Campus on the following dates:

18th October 2017

15 November 2017

17 January 2018

21 February 2018

21 March 2018

18 April 2018

16 May 2018

20 June 2018

Details of presenters will be announced via the blog.

Any questions please feel free to email me at: ckillingback@bournemouth.ac.uk

CQR lunchtime seminars “In Conversation …” continue with “Phenomenology” this Wednesday!

13432167_10154245215569855_4045956637427322389_n-001

Breaking News! In spite of the recent flooding in Royal London House, the CQR Wed Seminar will go ahead as planned in Room 201. The lifts, however, will be out-of-order.

Following  on from the two very successful (and jam packed!) earlier seminars, the Centre for Qualitative Research “In Conversation …”  series continues with

“Phenomenology”

presented by

Jane Fry and Vanessa Heaslip

Wed., 2 Nov., Royal London House 201 at 1 pm.

 Mark your diaries now and join us for an intriguing conversation!

Because CQR is keen to make information available to students and staff about qualitative METHODS, the seminars are arranged somewhat differently than the typical lunchtime seminar.

We are asking TWO (or more) presenters to agree to present each research method as a CONVERSATION…first, between each other, and then with the audience.  We are also asking that no PowerPoint be used in order that it is truly a conversation and NOT a lecture. The conversations will be about a particular research method and its pros and cons, NOT research projects or outcomes.

Many of us then move next door to RLH to Naked Cafe to continue the conversations and network. Faculty and Students invited to attend!

See you Wednesday at Royal London House 201 at 1 pm.  Students and Staff are Welcome!!

FMC Research Seminar, 4pm, 12 Oct: Prof Geoffrey Samuel, University of Kent: ‘The Paradigm Case: Is Reasoning and Writing in Film Studies Comparable To (or With) Reasoning and Writing in Law?’

Faculty of Media and Communication

Research Seminar Series 2016-17

A Conflict, Rule of Law and Society

Research Seminar

 

Venue: F309, Fusion Building, Talbot Campus, Bournemouth University, Fern Barrow, Poole, Dorset, BH12 5BB 

 

Wednesday 12 October 2016 at 4pm

 

Conflict, Rule of Law and Society Welcomes:

 

Prof Geoffrey Samuel, University of Kent

 

The Paradigm Case: Is Reasoning and Writing in Film Studies Comparable To (or With) Reasoning and Writing in Law?

To what extent can theories or models that have been developed by literary and film theorists inform legal knowledge? Can any such literary and film models offer any serious insights to legal epistemology or are such ‘borrowings’ likely to remain at best rather superficial? The purpose of this contribution is to suggest that there are a number of theories – or at least models – that can prove quite fruitful for lawyers. Three, in particular, will be examined: namely personification theory, representation theory and reception theory. Personification theory is concerned with the notion of persona in cinema, theatre and literature and reflects, in particular, on the relevance of identity in films like Vertigo (1958) and Phoenix (2014). Persona, of course, is both a literary and a legal concept and so there is, however tenuous, a direct conceptual connection. Representation theory (see Bacon extract overleaf) has already had some impact on law – it can be seen as an aspect of fiction theory (see Vaihinger) – and this impact might be revived with the publication of a recent work by Professor Mathieu. Reception theory (see Dzialo overleaf) is more closely associated with hermeneutics which of course as a scheme of intelligibility has attracted much attention from jurists. Nevertheless the categories of text developed by Stagier have, perhaps, a particular reference for the jurist: what is the relationship between legal texts and their readers and does this relationship vary according to the nature of the text in question? One further point will be developed with respect to these theories or models mentioned. Perhaps labelling them as ‘theories’ or ‘methods’ is unhelpful; a more fruitful label might be one mentioned by Bouriau in his examination of Vaihinger’s ‘as if’ (comme si) fiction theory. It is not so much a theory; it is more of an ‘epistemological attitude’ (attitude épistémique).

 

Geoffrey Samuel Born in 1947 in England, Geoffrey Samuel is currently a Professor of Law at the University of Kent and a Professor affilié at the École de droit, Sciences Po, Paris. He received his legal education at the University of Cambridge and holds doctoral degrees from the Universities of Cambridge, Maastricht and Nancy 2 (honoris causa). He has also held many visiting posts in France, Belgium and Switzerland and is still a visiting professor in Rome (Tor Vergata), Fribourg and Aix-en-Provence. Geoffrey Samuel is the author of many books on contract, tort, remedies, legal reasoning and legal epistemology, the most recent being An Introduction to Comparative Law Theory and Method (Hart, 2014) and A Short Introduction to Judging and to Legal Reasoning (Edward Elgar, 2016). His areas of specialisation are the law of obligations, comparative law and legal reasoning.

 

All are welcome and we look forward to seeing you there!

 

About the series

This new seminar series showcases current research across different disciplines and approaches within the Faculty of Media and Communication at BU. The research seminars include invited speakers in the fields of journalism, politics, narrative studies, media, communication and marketing studies.  The aim is to celebrate the diversity of research across departments in the faculty and also generate dialogue and discussion between those areas of research.

 

Contributions include speakers on behalf of 

The Centre for Politics and Media Research

Promotional Cultures and Communication Centre

Centre for Public Relations Research and Professional Practice

Centre for the Study of Journalism, Culture and Community (JRG and NRG)

Centre for Intellectual Property Policy & Management

Conflict, Rule of Law and Society

EMERGE

Centre for Film and Television

 

 

 

Reminder: BUDI lunch time research seminar open to all BU staff and students

You are cordially invited to a BUDI research seminar which is open to all students and staff.
Please feel free to bring your lunch.

 

“Fire safety in the home: local lessons – global reach”

By Dr Michelle Heward

 Tuesday 8 March 2016

13.00 – 13.50pm

EB202, Executive Business Centre

 

Abstract
Objectives: Impairment, disability and dementia are substantial factors in increasing the risk of injury or death from fire in the home. There is, therefore, a concern that the number of people with dementia injured or dying in fires in the home will increase, in relation to the rising number of people living with dementia internationally.

Methods: Mixed methods study. Online survey sent to all Fire and Rescue Services (FRSs) in the United Kingdom (UK) (n=55) to establish provision of guidance and resources for people affected by dementia.  Four focus groups: fire service professionals; other professionals; and two with people with dementia and family carers in UK (South West). Explored experiences of home safety risks (including fire risks) and risk reduction strategies, alongside ideas for project outputs such as resources.

Findings: 20 FRSs responded to the survey giving a response rate of 36.4%. A descriptive analysis showed that the provision of guidance and resources for people affected by dementia varies widely across the UK, with few providing dementia-specific information leaflets and resources. During the focus groups, people affected by dementia identified different fire risks and risk reduction strategies to those outlined by professionals. However, a need to understand each person and their individual situation came across in each of the focus groups. This was considered a vital part in determining the individual risks within each home environment. Participants also felt that a range of resources that reflect individual needs would be a useful prevention strategy.

Conclusions: For communities to be truly dementia-friendly there is a need to ensure equity in how services respond to the needs of people affected by dementia. Dementia-specific guidance and resources developed as an output from this project could be shared nationally and internationally to address potential consequences of fire safety inequality in the home. However, there remains a need for cross disciplinary working across all sectors to enable people with dementia and their families, practitioners, policy makers, and the general public to understand and contribute towards effective dementia-friendly communities. This case study of fire safety in the home demonstrates the potential impact of local level studies to improving quality of life of people affected by dementia across the globe.

 

We hope you can join us.