Category / BU research

Nesta – Ageing Well Challenge

Image of an old lady in a wheelchair & close up of old man

Ageing Well Challenge Prize

 

Towards the later stages of life the quality of where we live takes on a greater significance, in particular social relationships and networks.  There is evidence that demonstrates the importance of supporting older people to live independently for as long as they can and that people too often lack the support networks and resources to make it possible. We know from research evidence that feeling connected and having supportive social relationships has a strong link to health and longevity.

Isolation is a major factor impacting on older people’s well-being and life expectancy.  Isolation and loneliness are not necessarily effects of the ageing process, but life events associated with older age such as leaving work, health decline and bereavement do put people at greater risk. At the same time, factors such as a good local environment and good social networks can help protect older people.

Being able to stay mobile is crucial to older people’s wellbeing, as loss of mobility means the loss of so many other things from their lives such as the ability to go shopping, meet friends and pursue hobbies and interests.

The pace of demographic change creates the need for radical new approaches to support older people to live well by mobilising community and civic resources more effectively. There are already some interesting innovations that seek to respond to this challenge, such as Care4Care and Good Gym, but the scale of the challenge demands more and there is good evidence that this is an area where social action has an important role to play. The involvement of older people in the design and development of ideas is also important in providing inclusive responses to older peoples’ needs.

Nesta are offering a prize for the innovation that can reduce the isolation and/or increase the mobility of vulnerable older people by providing new opportunities for communities to come together to give time, skills and resources.  Please visit their web site for more information.

 The RKE Operations team can help you with your application. 

HEA Doctoral Programme

The Doctoral Programme forms part of the Higher Education Academy’s strategy to undertake a significant and extensive study to develop pedagogical knowledge and evidence based practice in Higher Education.

The Doctoral Programme enables focused long run study to be carried out within a well-supported environment.

The creation of yearly cohorts of supervisors and students maximises the potential for synergies and maximum impact on policy and practice.

The 2012-13 call for applications to host studentships is now open.

The call will close at 5pm 31st August 2012.

Royal Society – University Research Fellowship

This scheme is for outstanding scientists in the UK who are in the early stages of their research career and have the potential to become leaders in their field.

 The scheme provides the opportunity to build an independent research career. Those appointed are expected to be strong candidates for permanent posts in universities at the end of their fellowships.  The scheme covers all areas of the life and physical sciences, including engineering, but excluding clinical medicine and any researcher addressing a direct biomedical research question.

Eligibility requirements
The applicant must:

  • have a PhD (note we will not consider applicants who have just submitted their PhD); be in the early stages of their research career (between 3 to 8 years of research experience since their PhD) by the closing date of the round
  • not hold a permanent post in a university or not-for-profit organization in the European Economic Area (EEA)
  • be a citizen of the EEA or a be a Swiss citizen (or have a relevant connection to the EEA or Switzerland)

The European Economic Area (EEA) consists of the European Union (including the UK) plus Iceland, Norway and Liechtenstein.

Applicants should ensure that they meet all the eligibility requirements, which are explained in the scheme notes .

Value and tenure
The scheme provides funding to cover the applicant’s salary costs, estates costs and indirect costs. Under the full economic costing model, 80% of these costs will be met by the Royal Society. Research expenses (up to £13,000 for the first year and up to £11,000 annually thereafter) will also be provided.
Initially funding is provided for five years with the opportunity to apply for an extension of three additional years. The University Research Fellowship provides researchers with maximum flexibility and can be held part-time, and allows sabbaticals, secondments or international experience.

The basic salary requested should be at a level commensurate with the applicant’s skills, responsibilities, expertise and experience, up to a maximum of £37,555 per annum.  An annual spine point increase of 3% may be applied to the salary.

No indexation should be applied to the salary, indirect and estates costs; the Society will apply an annual inflationary increase to these budget headings of successful awards.  The level of inflation applied will be determined by HM Treasury’s GDP deflator.  This will be reviewed on an annual basis and the value of awards amended in line with increases or decreases in the GDP deflator.

Application process
Applications are initially reviewed and then shortlisted by members of University Research Fellowship Selection Panels. Applicants are notified if they have reached the shortlisting stage by December.  The shortlisted proposals are reviewed by three independent referees suggested by the panel members and successful applicants are shortlisted for interview. Applicants are informed of the result of this stage in February/March and interviews take place in early to mid April.  The final decision is made at a meeting of the panel Chairs in April, and applicants are notified of the result in early May. 

Please note that interviews for the fellowships are held at the Royal Society. Applicants are asked to keep April free. Only applicants that pass the other stages of assessment will be invited.

 The RKE Operations team can help you with your application.

EPSRC Call for Ground and Structural Engineering

Closing date: 16:00 on 20 September 2012

Summary

Engineers have an important contribution to make by solving major challenges. The government has recognised key challenges pertaining to our nation’s long term construction and infrastructure needs and associated quality of life and economic competitiveness. This call focuses on one aspect of this where engineers and physical scientists have a leadership role to play.

The Engineering and Physical Science Research Council (EPSRC) invites proposals for research into Ground and Structural Engineering focussed on the challenges highlighted in the EPSRC Review of the area. EPSRC has a possible £8M to support up to five high quality consortia led proposals in the area of Ground and Structural Engineering.

Proposals will be assessed using a two stage process. First there will be an expert reviewers sift panel followed by an interview stage for invited applicants.

Applicants will be expected to demonstrate that the two networks funded by EPSRC in this research area in 2011 have facilitated the proposed research.

Furthermore applicants must complete the intent to submit web form found here by 24 August 2012 indicating their intention to submit. In the event of the likelihood of multiple submissions from the same institution or group ESPRC reserve the right to require bids to be consolidated prior to final submission.

Documents to download

 The RKE Operations team can help you with your application.

Chiropractic Council: consultation on a proposed scheme of revalidation for chiropractors

The General Chiropractic Council invites tenders for a consultation on a proposed scheme of revalidation for chiropractors.

The tenderer will gain the views of all stakeholders on the Council’s proposals and determine how the proposed scheme can be improved to provide continuing assurance of the fitness to practise of registrants.

This contract is suitable for smaller suppliers and voluntary, community and social enterprise organisations. Funding is worth between £20,000 and £25,000 over six months.

Reference number: CO2REV

Deadline date:27/07/2012

The RKE Operations team can help you with your application.

ESRC/NIHR Dementia Initiative

Dementia initiative

The Prime Minister has announced plans to tackle what he is calling a ‘national crisis’ posed by dementia, including a doubling of research funding into dementia to £66 million per annum by 2015. As part of the funding being made available, the ESRC and National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) will be working together to support an initiative with up to £13 million funding available for social science research on dementia.

Scope

The initiative will fund large grants which will be national or international focal points for social science research in Dementia which make a significant contribution to scientific, economic and social impact. The call will address the following areas, see Research Agenda (PDF, 71Kb) for full details:

  • Prevention, including public awareness and early presentation
  • Public health of behaviour change, including the role of social interventions in slowing cognitive decline
  • Delivery of interventions in hospitals care homes and carers, including the interface between professionals, lay people and patients

Documentation

Timetable

  • Meeting for potential applicants – 3 July 2012
  • Launch/open call – w/c 9 July 2012
  • Closing date for outline call – w/c 11 September 2012
  • Announce decisions for outline call – mid December 2012
  • Closing date for full call – February 2013
  • Inviting short-listed applicants for interviews – June 2013
  • Interviews – June 2013
  • Announce final decisions – July 2013

Links

Contact

For further information please email: dementia@esrc.ac.uk

 The RKE Operations team can help you with your application.

BU representation at The 2nd Global Congress for Qualitative Health Research, Milan, June 2012

This conference provided the opportunity for BU researchers to share their research experiences with colleagues from across several continents and for them to network with world experts and research teams with similar interests. Jenny Roddis, Louise Worswick and Liz Norton from the School of Health and Social Care presented ongoing and completed PhD – related work at the conference. The theme of the congress was ‘Engaging people in health promotion and well-being’. Its purpose was to consider how qualitative research methodology and methods can facilitate active involvement of individuals in co-constructing their health. Louise presented a paper about patient perspectives of co-learning with primary care teams. Jenny presented an ongoing grounded theory study related to hereditary thrombophilia and Liz gave a paper about the unexpected learning derived from a grounded theory study about skin cancer prevention and young women. Liz is keen to deliver sessions about qualitative research and grounded theory to student groups across the university and so please contact her to discuss as appropriate.

Updates from the BU REF Academic Leadership Team (RALT) meetings

The BU REF Academic Leadership Team (RALT) meets every month to discuss matters relating to BU’s preparations for its submission to the Research Excellence Framework (REF) in 2013. The group is chaired by Matthew Bennett (Pro Vice-Chancellor) and consists of the 12 Unit of Assessment (UOA) Leaders, who are academics from across the different Schools in the University, the REF Communications Manager (Sally Gates), the Head of the Research & Knowledge Exchange Office (Julie Northam) and representatives from the BU REF Academic Steering Group (RASG). The meetings are administered and minuted by the Research Development Officer for the REF (Anita Somner/Peng Peng Ooi).

A summary of the most recent meetings is below for your information. The next meeting is scheduled for September due to staff taking their summer holidays (hopefully there will be some sunshine soon!).

17 May 2012

  • Feedback from external reviewers was presented by two UOA Leaders following the previous mock exercise on impact and environment over the winter 2011/2012.
  • The process for the current outputs mock exercise was outlined and deadlines given for returning all information prior to it being sent to the external reviewers.
  • An update was given on the BU REF Code of Practice and on the first phase of equality and diversity training for those involved in coordinating the REF at BU, which had recently taken place.
  • The REF Communication Manager gave an update on progress with developing the BU impact case studies and on the provision of social media training for academics.

18 June 2012

  • Progress with the collation of data for the outputs mock was discussed. Most of the paperwork had been received on time, which was great news!
  • Preparations for the full mock in spring 2013 were discussed along with the kind of support UOA Leaders might need.
  • Forthcoming REF deadlines for the provision of certain information ahead of the 2013 submission deadline were highlighted.
  • The REF Communications Manager gave a report on the outcomes of a series of meetings held recently with UOA Leaders discussing the BU impact case studies.

 

BU REF Code of Practice gets the green light!

Since submitting the BU Research Excellence Framework (REF) Code of Practice to the REF Team at HEFCE in April (see previous blog post for details), we have been waiting for their feedback as to whether our Code meets the requirements and guidance on equality and diversity considerations for our REF preparations and submission. We finally had confimation from HEFCE on Monday that the REF Equality and Diversity Panel had reviewed all the Codes that had been submitted in April and that our Code did indeed meet the REF Team’s criteria and is now officially approved! This is great news and means that we can now make it available here on the BU Research Blog.

A PDF copy of the Code and the recently published BU REF Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) will be circulated to academic staff in due course but you can access your copy here in the meantime. For the BU REF FAQs, which accompany the Code, a new tab has been added to the Blog (see REF tab above). Here you’ll find a series of questions and answers on a range of topics that should hopefully help with any initial burning issues you may have about the REF and our preparations here at BU. If you have a question that is not answered in the FAQs, please do leave a response to the relevant FAQ page on the Blog and we will follow this up for you. Alternatively you can contact me or Julie Northam in the Research Development Unit via email.

For more information about the REF at BU, see the previous REF posts on the Blog by clicking on the ‘ref’ tag. You can also access additional information from the REF website.

EPSRC Overseas Travel Grants – Call

Introduction

Overseas travel grants provide funding for international travel and subsistence. You can use them to visit recognised non-UK centres to study new techniques and to travel from the UK to start or develop international collaborations.

There is no limit on amount of funding and no closing dates.

Salary and indirect costs

In addition to travel and subsistence, the principal investigator can request funds to cover their salary and indirect costs. But funding is not available through this scheme to specifically support sabbatical absences or conference attendance. Consumables and equipment (e.g. laptops) are not covered under this scheme.

Number of people

The OTG should normally be for the support of the named principal investigator only. Support for other staff such as PhD students and researcher co-investigators can be requested although their inclusion should be fully justified.

Timing and the length of the grant

There is no upper limit on the length of grant.

If the funding decision for an OTG comes after the requested start date of the grant, the funding cannot be backdated. EPSRC do not allow any expenditure incurred before the announcement date to be charged to the grant. So please ensure you leave enough time for processing, which is currently at least 12 weeks before the proposed visit.

Where can you go

As long as the visit is to a recognised research centre there are no restrictions on which countries can be visited. If you need a visa to enter a country, you can include the cost of obtaining a visa in your proposal. But OTGs are exclusively for travel abroad, outside the UK. However you can apply for funding for researchers from abroad to visit the UK as a visiting researcher on a research grant proposal.

Linking OTG proposals to an existing ESPRC research grant

You do not need to link an OTG proposal to an existing EPSRC research grant. But there is an expectation that any new techniques learned or collaborations formed may lead to future research proposals.

OTGs and first grants

An applicant who has been a Principle Investigator on an OTG would be eligible to apply for a first grant. Applying for an OTG does not affect eligibility for the first grant scheme.

Support for researchers applying to Framework Programme 7

You can use overseas travel grants to help UK researchers to start or foster international collaborations to develop high-quality bids to Framework Programme 7 (FP7). Your application should address how the grant will help develop collaborations with European researchers for a FP7 bid.

Who can apply

Overseas travel grants (OTGs) are open to any full-time investigator employed by a recognised UK research organisation (excluding PhD students and PDRAs). Our funding guide gives full details of eligibility of organisations and individuals.

How to apply

You can apply for travel and subsistence, salary costs of the principal investigator for time spent on the grant, and indirect costs. There are no closing dates and you can apply at any time. You can apply for funding to visit one centre or several centres.

You should submit your proposal through the research councils’ joint electronic submission (Je-S) system. Select document type ‘standard proposal’ and scheme ‘overseas travel grant’. As these are usually smaller grants than standard responsive mode applications, it may not be appropriate for your description of the proposed research to fill the allocated 6 sides A4. Please complete as much as required to fully justify your intended visit.

Assessment

Proposals are assessed through our peer review process. If a proposal gets supportive referees’ comments, funding may be approved without consideration at a prioritisation panel. We try to provide a fast turnaround for these proposals but advise you to apply at least 12 weeks before the proposed visit.

More information

If you would like to discuss a possible proposal, or if you have any questions regarding applications for funding to develop collaborations for FP7 proposals than please search our staff contacts to find the person responsible for your research area. We cannot supply examples of successful OTG applications as these proposals have been submitted to us in confidence.

The RKE Operations team can help you with your application.

EPSRC Visiting Researchers call

EPSRC can provide funding for research scientists and engineers of acknowledged standing to visit a UK research organisation. The visiting researcher can be from anywhere in the world, including the UK.

Funding

Up to 12 months’ funding is available per visiting researcher to cover salary costs, travel and subsistence. The researcher can either make one long visit or a series of shorter visits within the 12-month period.

If the proposal is successful, EPSRC will make a grant to the host UK research organisation.

How to apply

There are no closing dates – you can apply at any time. The host UK researcher needs to apply for funding, not the visiting researcher.

Visiting researchers are part of EPSRC’s research base funding where you can apply at any time and in any area of our remit. You can ask for funding for one or more visiting researchers only as part of a larger research proposal.

You should submit your proposal electronically through the Research Councils’ joint electronic submission system (Je-S) as a standard proposal.

The research organisation should include Estates Costs and Indirect Costs for any Visiting Researcher regardless of whether the support being requested includes a salary contribution or is only Travel and Subsistence.

Assessment

Funding applications are assessed using the same peer review process as other responsive mode research proposals.

The RKE Operations team can help you with your application.

EPSRC call for UK and India Partnership in Advanced Manufacturing Research Challenges

Summary

Twenty-first century manufacturing is an increasingly global endeavour, driven by the rapid pace of technological change. High-value manufacturing processes are increasingly moving towards flexible, intelligent production systems that involve the inter-play of novel technologies, advanced materials, in-line analysis and ICT, dual working of people and automated systems, and precision engineered products and systems. Vital to all industrial sectors, modern manufacturing is more than merely production – it encompasses R&D, design, prototyping, production, distribution, service and support provision, and end-of-life repair, recycle or reuse.

Manufacturing is a top priority in both UK and Indian plans for economic growth. In 2011, India launched a National Manufacturing Policy that aims to increase manufacturing activity from a current 16% GDP to 25% by 2022. This equates to a growth rate of 12 14% per year, and aims to generate 100 million new jobs. The UK’s coalition government has also placed manufacturing at the heart of the economic recovery, and has published a series of policy announcements and reviews on the subject.

EPSRC and the Department of Science & Technology (DST) expect to commit up to £3M (Rs 23 crore) each on research programmes of up to three years in length. The funded programmes are expected to vary in size according to the demands of the proposed research, up to a maximum of £1M total, and will involve both UK and Indian researchers. This call invites applicants to submit a proposal for funding.

The proposal will be assessed by expert postal peer review, and those that are sufficiently supported will be advanced to a funding decision panel in February 2013. Funding decisions are expected to be made in March 2013.

Key dates

Activity Date
India and UK announcement date          02 July 2012
Call opens in Je-S for proposals 2 July 2012
Closing date for proposals 27 September 2012
UK (Je-S submission) deadline 16:00 GMT
India (DST receipt) deadline 20:30 Indian time
Postal peer review Early October 2012
Prioritisation panel for proposals February 2013
Grants announced March 2013
Funded projects to start January 2014 onwards
 

Documents to download

 
Contacts:
 
The RKE Operations team can help you with your application.

Royal Geographical Society Funding Opportunities

The Royal Geographical Society have announced several funding opportunities.  They are as follows:

Gilchrist Fieldwork Award

The Gilchrist Educational Trust offers an award of £15,000 to support original and challenging overseas fieldwork carried out by small teams of university academics and researchers.

The research should include a single field session of at least six weeks. There should be strong links with the host country and preferably the research should be of applied benefit to the host nation. 

The Award was created by the Gilchrist Educational Trust in 1990 and is judged in conjunction with the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG).

Deadline: 21 February 2014. The award is run biennially in even years.

Apply: Gilchrist Fieldwork Award guidelines (PDF) 

 

Slawson Awards

By the kind generosity of Fellows Paul and Mary Slawson, the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) offers two to three awards annually, each between £1,000 – £3,000, for PhD students intending to carry out geographical field research.

The awards, which have been given since 2001, support geographical fieldwork involving development issues with a high social and economic value.

Deadline: 22 February 2013

Apply: Slawson Award guidelines (PDF) 

 

Neville Shulman Challenge Award

2011 Neville Shulman Challenge Award recipients Paul Howard and Tanzin Norbu travel to the Himilayan Kingdom of Zanskar in winterThe Neville Shulman Challenge Award, first given in 2001, is an annual award of £10,000, established for the Society by Neville Shulman CBE and his associates.

The Neville Shulman Challenge Award aims to further the understanding and exploration of the planet: its cultures, peoples and environments, while promoting personal development through the intellectual or physical challenges involved in undertaking the research and/or expeditions.

Applications are invited from both individuals and groups.

Deadline: 21 September 2012

Apply: Neville Shulman Challenge Award Guidelines (PDF)

 

Peter Fleming Award

2007 Peter Fleming Award recipient Dr Pete Langdon cored lake sediments in Patagonia in order to reconstruct climatic variability over the last 500 years

The Peter Fleming Award is an award of up to £9,000 for a geographical research project that seeks to advance geographical science. It is one of the senior awards that the Society offers to support the development of geographical knowledge and understanding.

Applications can be made in any field of geography provided the project can demonstrate genuine advancement of current knowledge.

Deadline: 23 November 2012

Apply: Peter Fleming Award guidelines (PDF)

The Research Ethics and Code of Practice for RGS applies to all of the above calls:
Research Ethics and Code of Practice (PDF)

The RKE Operations team can help you with your application.

BU’s 100+ Media Directory Launch

In May 2012 Bournemouth University launched the BU 100+ Media Directory to highlight the wide range of research carried out at the university. The directory contains a selection of our top academics with their fields of expertise and contact details. Journalists can then call upon them for informed comment, news analysis or education insight for any article or broadcast they might be working on. We have a version online and also printed the directory.

There was a launch party for the printed directory in London and copies were sent out to journalists across the land. A copy landed on the desk of Edward Fennell from The Times. He wrote in the paper on 28 June: “As insiders know, the media school at Bournemouth University is outstanding. It’s full of ex-pros and recently won a Queen’s Anniversary Award. In short, it’s very cool all round.”

He then went on to describe the Media Directory as a thick, retro reporter’s notebook saying that is was “an interesting (albeit risky) shift away from reliance on its website. Every page features one of the university’s ‘Top 100’ experts, with all their credentials attractively laid out.” He pointed out that included among them were lawyers such as Dr Dinusha Mendis, Senior Lecturer in Law and the co-director of the Centre for Intellectual Property Policy and Management.”

He continued that this was when he realised that the directory might be suitable for law firms as well to help promote their partners, ending the article: “If you are confident enough then this is a lovely chunky way of telling your clients about your partners. It’s counterintuitive, but sometimes that is where you want to be.”

If you want a copy to land on your desk, please contact James Donald 01202 961032.

BU summer mock REF exercise gets underway

The fourth in a series of mock Research Excellence Framework (REF) exercises is currently underway at BU, with the paperwork now on its way to the external reviewers who have been specially recruited for their expertise in their subject area. The reviewers will spend the next month or so going through all the forms and submitted outputs and will provide feedback on each submission.

After reviewing the forms, the reviewers will also be involved in a meeting involving the BU Unit of Assessment (UOA) Leader and three or four nominated BU academics from each UOA to discuss the submissions and the feedback given. These meetings are due to take place during the early autumn. Once all the review meetings have taken place, the reviewers’ comments and the outcomes from the meetings will be compiled – this information will then be fed back to academics by the relevant UOA Leaders to help in the further development of the REF submissions.

The next (and final) REF mock exercise is due to take place during February to April 2013; it will be a full dry run and will be the last chance for you to receive external feedback on your outputs before the final REF submission deadline on 29th November 2013.

In the meantime, I’d like to thank all the BU academics who have been involved in the current mock exercise for taking part and for responding promptly to any queries. Thanks also to the UOA Leaders for collating the information and submitting it on time, particularly as the deadlines were quite tight. Your joint cooperation is much appreciated!

For all previous REF postings on the BU Research Blog, click here.

Wellcome Trust – University Awards in Medical History and Humanities

This scheme allows universities to attract outstanding research staff by providing support for up to five years, after which time the award holder takes up a guaranteed permanent post in the university.

A monograph and other substantial publications are expected to result from an award, so teaching and other non-research commitments are expected to be minimal during the period of full Wellcome Trust support.

Up to five years’ support is available, providing your full salary for three years, 50 per cent in the fourth year and 25 per cent in the fifth year.

Travel expenses to attend meetings are provided for five years, but research expenses are provided for the first three years of the award only.

You must be nominated by your prospective head of department and have an undertaking from the head of the institution, vice-chancellor, principal or dean that your personal support will be taken over by the institution at the end of the award.

Support is normally available only at lecturer level, although in exceptional cases awards to senior-lecturer level may be possible.

Initial enquiries about the scheme may be made by you (the potential candidate) or a department in an institution.

These enquiries should be followed by a preliminary application from you by e-mail or post including

  • an explicit statement from the head of the institution, vice-chancellor or dean demonstrating the institution’s commitment to the history of medicine field, and a statement confirming that the institution will provide 50 per cent salary costs in year four, 75 per cent in year five and full salary thereafter
  • CV and full publication list
  • an outline of no more than two pages of the proposed project
  • a letter of support from the head of department, including a statement on your expected teaching/administrative load for the five-year period (this can be sent by separate cover)
  • the approximate cost of the proposal, broken down into your salary, equipment and project running costs.

If successful, you will be invited to submit a full application.

A preliminary application must be submitted before a full application is invited.

Preliminary application deadlines are:
20 June
(with a full application deadline of 1 August)
1 December
(with a full application deadline of 1 February)

Contact: Grants Management – Medical History and Humanities
Wellcome Trust
Gibbs Building
215 Euston Road
London NW1 2BE, UK

T +44 (0)20 7611 8499
E
mhh@wellcome.ac.uk

The RKE Operations team can help you with your application.