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Matt Bentley’s Fusion Fund Research – South Africa Update

Friday marked a successful visit to Abagold in Hermanus. Hermanus is famous for whale watching where the Southern Right whales can been seen close to the shore from September to November. The visit to Abagold by Matt and Carol Simon was hosted by Stoffel van Dyk who is their Operational Director. Abagold is one of the world’s premier abalone aquaculture farms producing the highest quality abalone for the export market. Abagold’s operation is sustainable and helps protect the wild abalone population from poaching activity. Abagold is also the industrial partner in the Fusion Investment Fund project. The farm will offer facilities for BU students who will trialling novel technologies for controlling shell-boring pests of the molluscs.

Talk BU Live this Tuesday in Dylan’s

 

Paola Palma will be talking about “Shipworms, shipwrecks and global ‘worming'” on Tuesday 24 February in Dylan’s bar at 5:30pm.

Join us for a fascinating insight into maritime archaeology and find out how we can save historical shipwrecks from being eaten by shipworms.

The talk lasts just 20 minutes and is followed by a short Q&A. To find out more or get to involved check out the Talk BU pages.

Please note this talk will be filmed and made available online.

Shipworms, shipwrecks and global ‘worming’

BU’s Paola Palma will be introducing us to a world of shipwrecks and shipworms at the next Talk BU Live event on Tuesday 24 February. Join us in Dylan’s Bar at 5:30pm for a fascinating insight into maritime archaeology and the secrets beneath the sea.

About the talk

Marine borers, particularly shipworms – destroyers of timber par excellence – have been a well-known threat to sailors since ancient times. They attacked the wooden hulls of ships with such intensity that the weakened planks broke up even with mild impact such as hitting a rock or a floating object, causing tragic ship-wrecks. Even the survival of sunken ships as historic wrecks depends on the mercy of wood-destroying organisms, which may turn these “port-holes” to history into meaningless junk.

Recent research along the English coast has shown evidence of a shipworm which is typical of much warmer waters. But what exactly are these sea-dwelling critters? Why are they so far north? And what can we do to stop them destroying our maritime history?

About Talk BU Live

Talk BU Live is a once monthly on-campus event designed to get people talking and thinking. Talks are no more than 20 minutes long with a short Q&A at the end and are open to all students and staff at BU.

You can get involved by tweeting #TalkBU or find out more by contacting the team below or visiting the Talk BU page on the BU website.

Please note that this event will be video recorded and made available online.

 

Contact

Tel: +44 (0) 1202 961041

Email: newsdesk@bournemouth.ac.uk

Web: www.bournemouth.ac.uk/talk-bu

“A Breath of Fresh AiR”

The Bournemouth University ARTS in Research Collaborative (AiR) held a two-day workshop in late summer to experiment with interviewing, narrative and ephemera, and arts-based representations of such approaches (reported here previously). An article available online from today in The Qualitative Report by Kip Jones entitled, “A Report on an Arts-led, Emotive Experiment in Interviewing and Storytelling” details the thinking behind this effort and the mechanisms put in place that contributed to the workshop’s success.

The paper reports on the two-day experimental workshop in arts‐led interviewing technique using ephemera to elicit life stories and then reporting narrative accounts back using creative means of presentation.

 Academics and students from across Departments at Bournemouth University told each other stories from their pasts based in objects that they presented to each other as gifts. Each partner then reported the shared story to the group using arts‐led presentation methods.

Narrative research and the qualitative interview are discussed. The conclusion is drawn that academics yearn to express the more emotive connections generated by listening to the stories of strangers.

The procedures followed for the two‐day workshop are outlined in order that other academics may also organize their own experiments in eliciting story using personal objects and retelling stories creatively.

Because the group wanted to take the impact of this experience further, AiR applied and was accepted to present the concept at the Social Research Association’s workshop ‘Creative Research Methods’ on 8 May at the British Library in London. The Collaborative is about to meet up to brainstorm ways in which to translate their experiences of the workshop into a more presentational one.

Anyone from across Departments, whether lecturer, researcher, student or faculty, is welcome to join the ARTS in Research Collaborative. Please contact Kip Jones if you are interested in joining or just want to know more about the Collaborative.

 This just in from Creative Quarter!

Ten ‘rules’ for being creative in producing research

Research Cluster Conflict, Rule of Law and Society is holding a Workshop on ‘Contemporary Issues in International Law’ on Tuesday 28th October 2014, 10-13.00 in EB206

 

 

The commitment and role of the international community in fighting Islamic State (IS/ISIL) are a daily item on the news. Therefore the Cluster for Conflict, Rule of Law and Society is holding a Workshop on ‘Contemporary Issues in International Law’ on Tuesday 28th October 2014, 10-13.00 in EB206.
The workshop brings together Undergraduate and Postgraduate students studying International Law and those interested in the issues of terrorism and the use of force in general. It will be a forum for discussion and debate on

  • the situation in Ukraine/Russia (including the annexation of Crimea and the downing of Malaysia Airline MH17)
  • the situation involving IS/Iraq/Syria, and
  • will ask what the status quo of the ‘Responsibility to Protect’ (R2P) doctrine is.

 

The workshop will be led by Dr. Melanie Klinkner and Sascha Dov Bachmann, Associate Professor in International Law.

There will be tea, coffee and biscuits and interested staff and students are very welcome to join.

Two-day ARTS in Research Workshop at the Lighthouse Centre for the Arts in Poole

Bournemouth University Centre for Qualitative Research and

ARTS in Research Collaborative

in co-operation with
The Lighthouse Poole’s Centre for the Arts
Centre of artistic excellence for live events, theatre, music, film & visual arts present:
Two-day Workshop 20 & 21 November, 2014
Developing Arts-based Approaches
to Academic Research  
With Hazel Evans, Artist-in-Residence at The Lighthouse
Established artist in Dorset, Hazel is a multi-disciplinary artist working with the themes of communication, journeys, interior and exterior landscapes of the body. Her storytelling theatre company ‘Valise Noire’, was established in 2011. “Words, musical scores and ink on paper fusing the past and present, inspire my illustrative and written work. I enjoy blending antiquity with contemporary, reality and fantasy, black and white. I respond to music in real time documenting the feelings and sounds by the visual landscaping of my illustrations, poems and live art. ” –Hazel Evans
Spend two days exploring the workspaces of living, breathing performers and artists with us at the Lighthouse!  You will have a tour of the facilities, then see and discuss Hazel’s installation in the gallery. With Hazel’s guidance, you will work on your own projects, beginning in text as a point-of-departure. You will explore working with your body, music and/or multi-media during the two days of activities.
Cost for the two-day workshop: £200.
Early-bird discount (by 31st October): £175.
Teas, coffees on arrival and mid-morning break plus choice of finger buffet lunch will be included in the price. The days will run from 9:30 am until 4 pm.
Academic staff and students are encouraged to apply for funding through their School’s training and/or enrichment schemes.

Make Your Voice Heard – The next step

Thank you to all those who got came along and got involved in the first Make Your Voice Heard event on 10 September 2014.

Important topics were highlighted, such as how academics can enrich the media and how to balance different stakeholder wants and needs. There was also an opportunity to acquire hands-on tips and techniques for dealing with TV and radio appearances.

But the conversation doesn’t end there.

We want to know what you think about the relationship between research, academics and the media. For example, how do you currently approach the media as a researcher? What approaches worked for you, and what didn’t work? Are there limits to what should be shared via the media? And does using the media enhance a reputation?

Over the next week we’ll be posting some of the slides from the Make Your Voice Heard event on the Research Blog and asking what you think of research in the media.

Join the discussion by commenting below or email newsdesk@bournemouth.ac.uk if you would like to contribute to the debate by writing a blog post.

Talk BU Live

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next week sees the launch of Talk BU Live, a series of live talks from our academics aimed at getting people thinking and talking.

The first event will be in Dylan’s on 23 September and will start at 5.30pm. The talk itself will last 20 minutes or so.

Who is Talk BU Live aimed at? Anyone in the BU community – so academic staff, professional staff and students.

Too often we hear the term “silos” to describe working and studying at BU, so this is an opportunity to come along and explore other areas than just where you work or where you study. We need as a university to give our community a range of opportunities to expand horizons, to meet other people and to share ideas. Talk BU Live will be a chance to add to the whole experience of being involved with BU in whatever capacity.

The first talk is by Professor Stephen Heppell and is entitled “Shoeless & Sausages: Making Learning Better”. Stephen is an internationally acclaimed academic, practitioner and innovator of learning in all its forms and this is a fantastic opportunity to hear a truly influential voice in the field of education discussing the world of learning. Stephen’s research is very wide-ranging and touches on everything from not wearing shoes in class to aid concentration to what one should eat on the morning of an exam.

Further details of the event and of BU’s comment page Talk BU here.