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Health Promotion article is being read

Our article ‘Understanding health education, health promotion & public health’ [1] is getting read according to ResearchGate.  This conceptual/ theoretical paper was published open access in late 2021 in the Journal of Health Promotion and it reached 4,500 reads yesterday. Whilst the web side of the journal suggests today that the PDF of the paper has been downloaded 8,511 times.

 

Prof. Edwin van Teijlingen

Centre for Midwifery & Women’s Health (CMWH)

 

 

Reference:

  1. van Teijlingen, K. R., Devkota, B., Douglas, F., Simkhada, P.,  van Teijlingen, E. R. (2021). Understanding health education, health promotion and public health. Journal of Health Promotion, 9(1): 1–7. https://doi.org/10.3126/jhp.v9i01.40957

New paper by FHSS PhD student Abier Hamidi

This morning the journal Discover Social Science & Health informed us that Abier Hamidi’s latest paper ‘Islamic Perspectives on HIV: A Scoping Review’ has been accepted for publication [1]Discover Social Science & Health is an Open Access journal publishing research across the full range of disciplines at the intersection of health, social and biomedical sciences.  This latest review is part of Abier’s PhD research project and it follows several earlier related publications [2-7].

Abier is supervised by Dr. Pramod Regmi, Principal Academic-International Health  and the Global Engagement Lead in the Department of Nursing Sciences, and Prof. Edwin van Teijlingen in the Centre for Midwifery & Women’s Health (CMWH).

Congratulations!

References:

  1. Hamidi, A., Regmi, P., van Teijlingen, E. (2024) Islamic Perspectives on HIV: A Scoping Review,  Discover Social Science & Health 4:6  https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/s44155-024-00063-7.pdf
  2. Hamidi, A. (2023) Social media now trumps traditional family networks in Libya – my Facebook survey reached 446,000 womenThe Conversation published: April 24.
  3. Hamidi, A., Regmi, P., van Teijlingen, E. (2023) Facilitators and barriers to condom use in Middle East and North Africa: a systematic review, Journal of Public Health, https://doi.org/10.1007/s10389-023-01923-3 
  4. Hamidi, A. (2023) Book Review: Fatma Müge Göçek and Gamze Evcimen, The I.B. Tauris Handbook of Sociology and The Middle EastSociologial Research Online 28(4)
  5. Hamidi A. (2022) HIV prevention – Challenges in reaching Libyan women: A narrative review. Women’s Health. 18: doi:10.1177/17455057221080832
  6. Hamidi, A., van Teijlingen, E., Regmi, P. (2021) Facilitators and barriers to condom use in Middle East and North Africa: a systematic review. PROSPERO CRD42021297160
  7. Hamidi, A., Regmi, P., van Teijlingen, E. (2021) HIV epidemic in Libya: Identifying gaps, Journal of the International Association of Providers of AIDS Care, 20 :1-5 https://doi.org/10.1177/23259582211053964 .

 

Intellectual Property for Academics – Weds 24th Jan

Planning or doing Research and/or Knowledge Exchange?

Do not miss..

‘‘Intellectual Property for Academics’’

Wednesday 24th January 10:30 – 12:00

Room 305, Fusion Building, Talbot Campus

A workshop presented by Dr Nicholas Malden, Partner at D Young&Co, a leading top-tier European intellectual property firm and Bournemouth University’s preferred choice for patent advice.

Introduction by FST Executive Dean, Christos Gatzidis.

  • A brief intro to IP and its value for the holder and wider society
  • Inventorship and ownership – What’s important and what are the considerations in research projects?
  • Third party IP rights – What are the considerations?
  • What needs to go in a patent application?
  • Patent filing versus trade secret versus disclosure – choices and consequences

This is a unique opportunity to listen to valuable discussions, ask questions and learn ‘‘the need to know’’ from an industry expert about IP from the academic perspective.

Reserve your place here

For any queries regarding the content of this session, please contact lhutchins@bournemouth.ac.uk, for any other information please email RKEDF @ RKE Development Framework

Media coverage in Nepal

Last week Mr. Yogesh Dhakal, who is Deputy Editor at Shilapatra, an online newspaper in Nepal, interviewed three UK professors: Julie Balen (Canterbury Christ Church University), Simon Rushton (the University of Sheffield) and Edwin van Teijlingen (Bournemouth University).  The focus of the interview (see interview online here) was our recently completed interdisciplinary study ‘The impact of federalisation on Nepal’s health system: a longitudinal analysis’.

In this Nepal Federal Health System Project we studied the consequences for the health system of Nepal’s move from a centralised political system to a more federal structure of government.  This three-year project is UK-funded by the MRC, Wellcome Trust and FCDO (Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office; formerly DFID) under the Health Systems Research Initiative.  This joint project is led by the University of Sheffield in collaboration with Bournemouth University, the University of Huddersfield, Canterbury Christ Church University and two  institutions in Nepal, namely MMIHS (Manmohan Memorial Institute of Health Sciences) and PHASE Nepal. 

Today (23rd January) the article appeared online in Nepali.  We have seen the transcript in English of the actual interviews with the three of us, but I have no idea how the journalist has edited, selected and translated the relevant text.

Prof. Edwin van Teijlingen

CMWH (Centre for Midwifery & Women’s Health)

Call for Knowledge Exchange & Innovation Panel Members

Expressions of Interest Invited

Following the previous call for membership of the Knowledge Exchange and Innovation Funding Panel, we are now seeking further expressions of interest from the academic community at any career stage. Applicants from the Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, and from Associate Professors, are particularly welcomed in this call.

What is the Knowledge Exchange & Innovation Funding Panel?

The recently formed panel is reinvigorating how we fund knowledge exchange and innovation projects internally; as a group we are developing a more agile approach to funding allocation and management, enabling collaboration with external partners to become more responsive.

The Value of Panel Membership

Membership of a funding panel enables you to be part of an important decision-making process, making a significant contribution to the direction and impact of knowledge exchange and innovation at the institution and beyond. Working individually and as a team, Panel Members evaluate applications to the internal Higher Education and Innovation Funding stream and other related funds. If you have not been a member of a funding panel previously, this offers an opportunity to develop peer reviewing skills and give back to the academic community by drawing on your expertise and insight working with others from across a range of disciplines and career stages. You will need to be confident in evaluating the merit of applications based on the requirement of the fund, the innovation and rigour of the proposal and to share your thoughts effectively and appropriately with the wider Panel meetings and provide feedback to ensure transparency.

By becoming an Panel Member you will be ensuring that internal funding at BU is used for projects that will have real world impact. It’s also a great opportunity to engage with colleagues and learn about research and knowledge exchange happening across the faculties.

What would I commit to as a Panel Member?

You will have to attend a number of Panel meetings per year, typically 5-6, either in person or online, read and review funding applications and occasionally make agreements via email circulation with the Panel when some detailed feedback maybe required.

Sounds interesting? How to apply:

Please send a short expression of interest, around ¾ of a page, outlining why you think you’re suitable to be a panel member. There is no need to provide a long CV of your expertise, just enough to:

– Tell the Chair and the Panel Members about your field of specialism;

– Highlight any experience you have of peer review and/or panel membership;

– A brief description of the type of skills you can bring (e.g. experience of working with external organisations; good with moderating discussions; able to respectfully challenge the status quo; creative innovation leadership etc.)

And perhaps most importantly:

  • Why you want to join the panel . Have you been on a panel before, for example or does your role require you to give feedback on projects? Are you simply keen to be involved? It would be very helpful if you could demonstrate your knowledge of KE, innovation and the impact agenda.

Please email your expression of interest to the Knowledge Exchange Manager, Dr. Wendelin Morrison wsmorrison@bournemouth.ac.uk by 5pm on Wednesday the 24th January.

Applications from individuals from groups generally underrepresented on University committees/panels (minority ethnic, declared disability) are particularly welcome.

Intellectual Property for Academics – a ‘grand tour’ of IP

‘‘Intellectual Property for Academics’’

Wednesday 24th January 10:30 – 12:00Talbot Campus

A workshop presented by Dr Nicholas Malden, Partner at D Young&Co, a leading top-tier European intellectual property firm and Bournemouth University’s preferred choice for patent advice.

 

A person in a suit and tieDescription automatically generatedNick Malden has more than 18 years’ experience in intellectual property specialising in patents, in particular those concerned with electronics, physics, materials, medical devices, and software. Prior to joining D Young & Co he was a research associate at Manchester University, based at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), in Hamburg, Germany.

 

Nick Malden will do a ‘grand tour’ of IP for academics, which will include:

  • A brief intro to IP and its value for the holder and wider society
  • Inventorship and ownership – What’s important and what are the considerations in research projects?
  • Third party IP rights – What are the considerations?
  • What needs to go in a patent application?
  • Patent filing versus trade secret versus disclosure – choices and consequences

This is a unique opportunity to listen to valuable discussions, ask questions and learn ‘‘the need to know’’ from an industry expert about IP from the academic perspective.

 

Reserve your place here under “Intellectual Property for Academics” in the drop down menu, as soon as possible

 

For any queries regarding the content of this session, please contact lhutchins@bournemouth.ac.uk, for any other information please email RKEDF @ RKE Development Framework

Discovering Causal Relations and Equations from Data

Discovering equations, laws, or invariant principles underpins scientific and technical advancement. Robust model discovery has typically emerged from observing the world and, when possible, performing interventions to falsify models.

Recently, data-driven approaches like classic and deep machine learning are evolving traditional equation discovery methods. These new tools can provide unprecedented advances in computer science, neuroscience, physics, philosophy, and many applied areas.

We have just published a new study discussing concepts and methods on causal and equation discovery, outlining current challenges and promising future lines of research. The work also showcases comprehensive case studies in diverse scientific areas ranging from earth and environmental science to neuroscience.

Our tenet is that discovering fundamental laws and causal relations by observing natural phenomena is revolutionised with the coalescence of observational data and simulations, modern machine learning algorithms and domain knowledge. Exciting times are ahead with many challenges and opportunities to improve our understanding of complex systems.

This study is a collaborative work between eight universities in Europe and the United States (Valencia, Berlin, Tübingen, Jena, Stockholm, New York, and Bournemouth Universities).

Camps-Valls, G., Gerhardus, A., Ninad, U., Varando, G., Martius, G., Balaguer-Ballester, E., Vinuesa, R., Diaz, E., Zanna, L. and Runge, J., 2023. Discovering causal relations and equations from data. Physics Reports, 1044, 1-68 (Impact Factor=30).