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Women’s Academic Network Research Seminar on Gender, Race & Ethnicity

As gender intersects with race and ethnicity it is important to make visible the experiences of ethnic ‘Other’ women (Ratna and Samie, 2017). The intersection causes deep-rooted prejudice, discrimination and injustice that is evidenced within Higher Education for staff and students (https://www.theguardian.com/education/2018/sep/07/uk-university-professors-black-minority-ethnic;https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/universities-want-to-pretend-racism-is-not-happening-q3bd77www)

 

Last week, in the inaugural WAN Gender Research Seminar, Dr Hyun-Joo Lim and Dr Deborah Gabriel presented their published academic research that shows how political and societal structures, cultures and every-day practices produce inequalities for Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) women, and men.

 

A key concern, which was demonstrated through both of their long-term qualitative research projects, is that despite established policy and legislative frameworks ethnic ‘Other’ women continue to face unequal and unjust treatment. This is corroborated through statistics that reveal the quantities of inequality around the world (https://www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/gender-equality/). However, both presenters argue that it is the lived experiences of BME women, and men, that must be made visible in order to properly reveal the subtle, and sometimes insidious, mechanisms of discrimination. Such a methodology enables deep and detailed knowledge that can produce change at a faster rate than at present. It is the intricacies within political and societal structures, cultures and practices that require our attention as academics, and scholars.

 

The seminar participants discussed the significance of the presented research – methodologies and empirical findings – as well as the reach of the research in terms of making a difference. Through sharing their work with students and staff at Bournemouth University, Dr Lim and Dr Gabriel connect research and pedagogy. We are better educated in the harsh realities women often experience. For example, the brutal human rights abuses faced by women who escape North Korea (https://theconversation.com/a-terrible-fate-awaits-north-korean-women-who-escape-to-china-82992), and the effects of a lack of critical conscious when it comes to white privilege within Higher Education in the UK. Education is the first step. The next steps involve activism and transformation of the status quo.

 

The seminar achieved three main aspects. First, it provided a critical forum to discuss frequently marginalised aspects of gender research – the intersections of race, ethnicity and gender. Second, it made explicit that official policy and legislation often mask contemporary inequalities and serve to present issues as no longer in need of scrutiny. Finally, that a focus on the personal and everyday is in order to theorise and implement change. Especially the adoption of a critical conscious by those with privilege and power (http://blackbritishacademics.co.uk/research/inside-the-ivory-tower/).

 

If you would like to present gendered-related research at the WAN Gender Research Seminar Series, please contact co-convenors:

 

Jayne Caudwell: jcaudwell@bournemouth.ac.uk

Lorraine Brown: LBrown@bournemouth.ac.uk

Francis Hawkhead: fhawkhead@bournemouth.ac.uk

Reminder: CQR Taster Seminar on Creative Writing Wed 1pm R409

Please make a note to join us this Wednesday at 1 pm in RLH 409

Creative Writing for Academics Taster Session with Kip Jones

All are most welcome!  It will be a lot of fun and chance to try your hand at some creative writing!

… and first chance to sign up for the full two-day workshop on Creative Writing for Academics coming 11 and 12 January!

Two papers rejected the day after submission in same week

This week we had this enviable record of two academic papers on health topics being rejected the day after submission.  The first paper was submitted on Monday to Issues in Mental Health Nursing.  Our paper reported the Content Analysis of a review of the nursing curricula on mental health and maternity care issues in Nepal. The journal editor emailed us the next day to inform us that the topic was interesting, but not relevant enough to the journal’s readers.

The second paper submitted by a different configuration of staff was submitted last Friday to the Journal of Youth & Adolescence.  The second paper reported a qualitative study on students views on abortion in the south of England.  This journal’s rapid reply came the next day (yesterday) stating that:

Unfortunately, the editors have completed an internal review of your study and have deemed your manuscript inappropriate for our journal. Although your manuscript has important strengths, the journal has moved away from supporting qualitative work (unless it would be part of a journal special issue). Please rest assured that our decision has nothing to do with the quality of your study or findings.

On both occasion we had discussed potential journals and we thought we had targeted appropriate journals for the respective manuscripts.  Moreover, in both manuscripts we managed to cite at least one paper published in the journal to which we had submitted it.  The general message to my colleagues is that it does not matter how many papers you have written and submitted, you will: (1) occasionally opt for the wrong journal; (2) continue to face regular rejection by journal editors; and (3) have an opportunity to submit to another journal.

 

Prof. Edwin van Teijlingen

Centre for Midwifery, Maternal & Perinatal Health

CQR Seminar: Creative Writing Taster Session

Wednesday, 5 Dec 1pm for an hour in RLH 409, experiment with the delights of

Creative Writing for Academics, a taster session, with Kip Jones.

“We passionately believe that as narrative researchers & storytellers we must promote narrative in the content & styles of our publications.

Publication or presentation that is counter to this does a disservice to our commitments as narrativists”.

…and if  you enjoy the session and want more, there will be a two-day workshop 11 & 12 January.

You will be able to sign up for the workshop at the  CQR seminar taster session!

The two-day workshop will be FREE! But you must commit to participating for the two full days. Places are limited and will fill up quickly.

Come along to the Taster Session on Wed 5 Dec at 1 pm, RLH 409, and have a go! It’s fun and you won’t be disappointed!

 

#TalkBU next Thursday (6 December) – Are you a Phoebe or a Monica? Improving your ability to communicate

#TalkBU is a monthly lunchtime seminar on Talbot Campus, open to all students and staff at Bournemouth University and free to attend. Come along to learn, discuss and engage in a 20-30 minute presentation by an academic or guest speaker talking about their research and findings, with a Q&A to finish. 

Being able to understand the characteristics and behaviours of different types of personality can help you understand the people you are interacting with, as well as yourself. Join us in the exploration of personality profiles, using Jelly Babies to help change the way you view people.

In this talk, Amanda Wilding, will be discussing her research, which centres around understanding different personalities and the benefit this can have to our social interactions

When: 6th December 2018

Where: FG04, Ground Floor, Fusion Building

Register here to attend

Research photography competition 2019

Can you tell a story of your research through photography?

That’s the challenge we set academics and research students at Bournemouth University.  Photography is a great way to capture and share a different side of your research with other staff, students and members of the public.  The last few years have seen our staff and students submitting a wide range of images summing up their research (last year’s entries can be seen below).

Want to enter 2019’s competition?

Whether you’re in the early stages of your research or it has come to the end, we are inviting all academics and student researchers from across the university to showcase your research through an image relating to this year’s competition theme – Place.  This could include:

  • An image relating to the place your research was carried out,
  • Places that might be impacted by or benefit from your research,
  • The place that inspired your research
  • Your own interpretation of the theme

Whatever your idea is, we want you to get involved and get creative!

Here’s what you have to do:

Step 1: Take your photo.

Each image will need to be 300pi (pixels per inch) with physical dimensions equivalent to an A3 size piece of paper (297 x 420 mm or 11.7 x 16.5 in).  Images smaller than this tend not to have a high print quality.

Step 2: Submit the photo!

You may enter only one photo per person. Once you have the perfect image, all you have to do is submit it by emailing the Research account (research@bournemouth.ac.uk) before the deadline, along with a 100 – 200 word description of your research behind the image.

The submission deadline is 9 January 2019 at 5pm. Late entries will not be accepted.

Staff, students and the general public will then be able to vote for their favourite image. The competition winners will be presented with a prize by Professor John Fletcher in the Atrium Art Gallery, in March 2019. All photographs will be presented in the Atrium Art Gallery for two weeks in March so you’ll get a chance to see all the entries.

Please read through the Terms & Conditions before entering.

This activity is recognised under the Global Talent Programme and allows participating students to gain credit towards their Global Talent Award.

BU PhD student PROSPERO publication

Congratulations to BU PhD student Dimitrios Vlachos who had his PROSPERO protocol published [1].   Dimitrios working on a project promoting the Mediterranean-style diet in childbearing age, he is supervised across faculties by Dr. Fotini Tsofliou and Prof. Katherine Appleton.

Well done!

Prof. Edwin van Teijlingen

Centre for Midwifery, Maternal & Perinatal Health (CMMPH)

 

Reference:

  1. Tsofliou, F., Appleton, K., Vlachos, D. (2018) Barriers and facilitators to following a Mediterranean style diet in adults: a systematic review of observational and qualitative studies. PROSPERO 2018 CRD42018116515

 

 

 

New paper on Nepal by FHSS’s Dr. Nirmal Aryal

Many congratulations to Dr. Nirmal Aryal, postdoctoral researcher in FHSS for his new publication ‘Blood pressure and hypertension in people living at high altitude in Nepal’ in Hypertension Research [1]. Hypertension Research is a prestigious journal published by Nature (Impact Factor of 3.4).

This is the first study of its kind to collect cardiovascular disease and risk factors related information at four different altitude levels above or equal to 2800 m and from ethnically diverse samples. This paper highlighted that despite known hypoxia-induced favourable physiological responses on blood pressure, high altitude residents (>2800 m) in Nepal might have an increased risk of raised blood pressure associated with lifestyle factors and clinicians should be aware of it. The authors previously published a systematic review paper summarizing global evidence on the relationship between blood pressure and high altitude [2].

This publication is available online at: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41440-018-0138-x and pre-refereed version is available in BURO.

Well done!

Dr. Pramod Regmi & Prof. Edwin van Teijlingen

 

References:

  1. Aryal N, Weatherall M, Bhatta YKD, Mann S. Blood pressure and hypertension in people living at high altitude in Nepal. Hypertension Res 2018 doi: 10.1038/s41440-018-0138-x[published Online First: Epub Date]|
  2. Aryal N, Weatherall M, Bhatta YKD, Mann S. Blood pressure and hypertension in adults permanently living at high altitude: a systematic review and meta-analysis. High Alt Med Biol 2016; 17: 185-193.

BU leads the development of eHealth gamification toolkit

The EU has countersigned the grant agreement for a BU led H2020-MSCA-RISE-2008 project on the development of a gamification toolkit for eHealth and mHealth product. The project consortium comprises six partners, including BU, the University of Malaga, a large hospital network in Spain, and three leading SMEs in the EU specialising in IoT, data science and mobile apps. The project team will investigate evidence-based gamification techniques to enhance the efficacy of eHealth and mHealth products, lower the cost of the innovation process and reduce the risk to people from adverse consequences.

Professor Wen Tang, Director of Centre for Games and Music Technologies based in the department of Creative Technology Faculty of Science and Technology, will lead the consortium and her team at BU with a total of 837,2000 euros grant support from EU, of which 197,800 euros to BU.

Highly topical BU article on BREXIT

Congratulations to Dr. Rosie Read and Prof. Lee-Ann Fenge in the Faculty of Health & Social Sciences who just published in the academic journal Health and Social Care in the Community.  Their paper is called What does Brexit mean for the UK social care workforce? Perspectives from the recruitment and retention frontline’ [1].  You can’t have a more topical academic paper and it is freely available on the web through Open Access!  

The paper is based on research on research they undertook last year on the impact of Brexit on the social care workforce.  A key finding is that, irrespective of whether they employ EU/EEA workers or not, research participants have deep concerns about Brexit’s potential impact on the social care labour market. These include apprehensions about future restrictions on hiring EU/EEA nurses, as well as fears about increased competition for care staff and their organisation’s future financial viability. This article amplifies the voices of managers as an under‐researched group, bringing their perspectives on Brexit to bear on wider debates on social care workforce sustainability.

Congratulations!

Prof. Edwin van Teijlingen

 

Reference:

  1. Read R, Fenge L‐A. (2018) What does Brexit mean for the UK social care workforce? Perspectives from the recruitment and retention frontline.
    Health Soc Care Community [online first] :1–7.    https://doi.org/10.1111/hsc.12684

 

 

PhD success

Congratulations to Dr Billy Senington on achieving the all important sign off from the examiners for his post viva modifications of his PhD thesis, titled:

An investigation into the spinal kinematics and lower limb impacts during cricket fast bowling and their association with lower back pain.

A lot of new findings in this area and a really significant contribution to knowledge.

Well done to Billy.

Supervisors: Dr Jonathan Williams and Professor Raymond Lee (Ex).

ADRC sharing research and making impact at key dementia conferences

In the last few weeks, members and a PhD Student from the Ageing and Dementia Research Centre (ADRC) have attended the latest dementia conferences and an awards ceremony.

28th Alzheimer Europe Conference, Barcelona (Spain)

Prof Jane Murphy, Dr Michele Board and Yolanda Barrado-Martín attended the 28th Alzheimer Europe Conference (29th to 31st October 2018). Jane presented a paper on her nutrition research ‘Innovative training to improve nutrition and hydration in people living with dementia’. Dr Michele Board presented a poster ‘Evaluating the impact of the virtual reality app “A walk through dementia” on students learning and practice’ centred on her research funded by Alzheimer’s Research UK. Whilst Yolanda presented a poster ‘What are the views of people living with dementia and their informal carers getting involved in Tai Chi?’ based on the findings from her PhD project which forms part of the TACIT Trial.

During the conference, over 800 international researchers met in Barcelona to learn about research, policy and practice around the theme ‘Making dementia a European priority’. Amongst the attendees to the conference, there were also people living with dementia and their carers who took the floor in different sessions. The main aim of those living with dementia was that they want to be involved in decision making processes in their day-to-day life and care, including their participation in research (i.e., advocating for co-creation approaches). Specific themes of the conference covered policies, care approaches and services for people living with dementia and their carers, as well as their rights in our society, and strategies to prevent and treat dementia.

13th Annual UK Dementia Congress, Brighton

 Prof Jane Murphy, Dr Michele Board, Dr Michelle Heward and Dr Ben Hicks attended the 13th Annual Dementia Congress (6th and 8th November 2018). Dr Michelle Heward presented a poster on the ‘implementation and evaluation of the Dementia Education And Learning Through Simulation 2 (DEALTS 2) programme’ a project funded by Heath Education England (HEE) to develop and evaluate an education toolkit for acute care settings. During the first plenary session, Minister of State for the Department of Health and Social Care Caroline Dinenage MP highlighted that “staff training for dementia is increasing with programmes like DEALTS 2”. As part of the dissemination funding for the DEALTS 2 programme, Michelle and Jane were also invited to talk to conference attendees visiting the HEE stand about the programme evaluation. Dr Michele Board presented her research funded by Alzheimer’s Research UK in a paper ‘Evaluating the impact of the Virtual Reality app ‘A Walk-Through Dementia’ on year one health care students’ clinical practice’.  Dr Ben Hicks presented a paper ‘Game Plan: promoting gaming technology amongst dementia practitioners’ based on his European funded research.

 

 

The annual conference attracts practitioners, academics and people with dementia and carers to discuss the latest innovations and research in the dementia field. The motion this year was ‘the right to services is more important that disability rights for people with dementia’ and stimulated a dynamic exchange of opinions during the many plenaries, parallel sessions and workshops

9th National Dementia Care Awards 2018, Brighton

Following the Dementia Congress, on the 8th November Dr Michelle Heward and Dr Michele Board were invited to represent the DEALTS 2 team at the National Dementia Care Awards, following the programme being shortlisted for the Best Dementia Care Award. The evening was full of glitz and glamour with the dress code ‘black tie’. Following a three course meal, finalists and the winners of the 14 categories were announced and celebrated. We had a fantastic night celebrating the hard work and dedication of so many individuals and teams from the dementia field, and although we did not win the category, we were delighted to be shortlisted for this prestigious national award.

Attendance at these events was a great opportunity to showcase some of the current research projects being undertaken by the ADRC team, hear the views of those living with dementia and their carers, and network with practitioners and researchers in the dementia field.

#TalkBU next Thursday – Accepting the unacceptable: how Government policy has led to an increase in disability hate crimes

#TalkBU is a monthly lunchtime seminar on Talbot Campus, open to all students and staff at Bournemouth University and free to attend. Come along to learn, discuss and engage in a 20-30 minute presentation by an academic or guest speaker talking about their research and findings, with a Q&A to finish. 

Reports of disability hate crime are on the increase. Research has found that changes to the incapacity benefits following the economic crash have been a contributing factor. Disabled people are now commonly perceived and framed as fraudulent ‘scroungers’ and ‘skivers’ and victimised as a result. Victims of hate crimes describe the inadequate, offensive and inappropriate responses from the criminal justice system that have created a sense of secondary victimisation. The impact of this on disabled communities is extensive, including moving home, acceptance of hate crime as a part of life, and more. So, what can be done?

In this talk, Dr Jane Healy, will be discussing hate crime experienced by people with disabilites. We will also be joined by the Mental Health Zone who will be discussing how to report hate crime at university.

When: 22nd November 2018

Where: F108, first floor of the fusion building

Register here to attend

Congratulations to Denyse King

Congratulations to Denyse King, who is currently attending the Future Technologies Conference, FTC 2018; Vancouver, BC; Canada (15-16 November).  Her conference paper ‘NoObesity apps – From approach to finished app’ has been published in Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing [1].  Denyse is part of the Centre for Midwifery, Maternal & Perinatal Health (CMMHP) where she is a Lecturer (Academic) in Midwifery based at BU’s campus in Portsmouth ,

Obesity is still a growing public health problem in the UK and many healthcare workers find it challenging to have a discussion with service users about this sensitive topic. They also feel they are not competent to provide the relevant heath advice and are seeking easily accessible, evidence-based, mobile health learning (mHealth). mHealth applications (apps) such as the Professional NoObesity and Family NoObesity (due for release late 2018), have been designed to: support families with making sustainable positive behaviour changes to their health and well-being, ease pressure on practitioners’ overweight and obesity care related workloads, as well as to support the education of professionals, students and service users. This paper describes the process of designing the apps from the inception of the idea, through the stages of research, app builds and testing. The processes of collaborative working to design and develop the apps to meet the needs of both service users and health professionals will also be reflected upon. Childhood obesity is an complex problem and whilst it is recognised that the NoObesity apps cannot singlehandedly resolve this health crisis, it is proposed that they can support families to identify and reduce the barriers that prevent them from living healthier, happier lives. 

Reference:

King D., Rahman E., Potter A., van Teijlingen E. (2019) NoObesity Apps – From Approach to Finished App. In: Arai K., Bhatia R., Kapoor S. (eds) Proceedings of the Future Technologies Conference (FTC) 2018. FTC 2018. Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing, vol 881. Springer, Cham, pp. 1145-1157.

New staff-student events management paper in the highest impact factor sport management journal

Congratulations to Dr. Miguel Moital, Principal Academic in the Department of Events & Leisure, who has just published a co-created paper in Sport Management Review, an Elsevier journal which boasts an impact factor of 3.5 and an acceptance rate of 17%. The paper is co-authored with two BA (Hons) Events Management graduates – Amy Bain and Harriet Thomas – who did their dissertation on prestigious sports events.

The paper explores the range of cognitive, affective, and behavioural outcomes of consuming prestigious sports event experiences. Amy and Harriet underpinned their dissertations on the Prestige Motivation Model, a model Miguel co-developed in 2009. Miguel covers the model in his Consumer Experience & Behaviour unit (Level 5) and in their dissertation both students went on to apply the model to sports events. Amy and Harriet did a very similar study with a difference: Amy focused on a variety of prestigious sports events, while Harriet focused on VIP sport event experiences. The two studies were combined to produce the now published paper. The full paper can be found here.

 

Commenting on the experience Amy said

“I’m delighted that my research has been published. I went to a great deal of effort to ensure that the subject of my dissertation was not only interesting and current, but a true and accurate reflection of the impact of prestige as a motivation to attend events. For me personally the most exciting part about the process was seeing the paper evolve in a way that it clearly demonstrates the potential of prestige to generate important outcomes for the attendee and the event organiser.”

Harriet was also delighted to have co-authored the paper:

“I’m so proud to see the research I conducted for my dissertation now included within the Sports Management Review journal- it’s something I never expected! I was really interested in the previous work carried out by Miguel on Prestige Motivation in Tourism and this acted as a starting point when deciding on my dissertation topic. The process was certainly a challenging one, and I had to edit, re-word and revisit my work many times throughout, so persistence was definitely key! The project soon started to come together and it’s so rewarding now to see I’ve contributed to an article within a top academic journal.”

Miguel said:

I am thrilled to see this paper published in a high quality journal, which gives credit to the quality of the work carried out by Amy and Harriet. I have covered prestige motivation in my consumer experience & behaviour unit since 2009, but the research on which this paper is based has greatly enhanced the content of the lecture, fulfilling an important gap in the module while at the same time inspiring other students to carry out further research on the topic. I am a strong believer in students-as-researchers and this paper in a top sport management journal is a great way of celebrating my 10th journal article co-created with BU undergraduate and post graduate students.

 

This paper is part of a long tradition within the Department of Events & Leisure involving the co-creation of papers based on student dissertations. In the past five years students and staff of the Department have published co-created papers in Event Management (Cognizant), the International Journal of Event & Festival Management (Emerald), the Journal of Fashion Marketing & Management (Emerald), Young Consumers (Emerald), and the Journal of Hospitality & Tourism Insights (Emerald). These publications are a testimonial of the high quality research carried out by events and leisure graduates.