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Postgraduate Research Experience Survey (PRES) 2021


Have your say

PRES will launch on 12 April 2021 for postgraduate research (PGR) students to complete.

Look out for an email from the University containing your unique link to the survey.


We are keen to make sure our PGRs have the best possible experience while studying with us. To do this, we need to know what you think works well and what as a University we could do better. This is your chance to tell us about your experience as a PGR at Bournemouth University.

Thank you to all PGRs who completed the 2019 PRES survey – we listened to you and your feedback has helped us to enhance your PGR experience in a range of areas.

This year the survey will open on 12 April 2021 and close on 17 May 2021. It will take around 15 minutes to complete. Feedback is confidential and any reporting will be entirely anonymous. We also kindly ask that all supervisors encourage their PGRs to participate in the survey.

How do I complete the survey?

You will receive an email from PRES@bournemouth.ac.uk on 12 April 2021 that contains a link, unique to you, to access the survey. If you can’t find this email, contact PRES@bournemouth.ac.uk and we’ll help you to get access.

We will be making a £1 donation for every survey completed on your behalf, to the student mental health wellbeing charity, Student Minds.

If you would like to know more about the survey, please visit: PRES 2021

We hope you take the opportunity to get involved this year and help us make improvements to your experience.

Best wishes,

Doctoral College

For any PRES related queries, please email: PRES@bournemouth.ac.uk

Some thoughts about PhD supervision in Public Health

Recently, Health Prospect: Journal of Public Health published our article on ‘PhD supervision in Public Health’ [1].  The lead author is Dr. Pramod Regmi, with co-authors Prof. Padam Simkhada (FHSS Visiting Faculty) from the University of Huddersfield and Dr. Amudha Poobalan from the University of Aberdeen.  The paper has a strong Aberdeen connection, the fifth oldest university in the UK.  Three of us (Poobalan, van Teijlingen & Simkhada) use to work in the Department of Public Health at the University of Aberdeen (one still does), and three of us (Poobalan, Regmi & van Teijlingen) have a PhD from Aberdeen.

Reference:

  1. Regmi, P., Poobalan, A., Simkhada, P., van Teijlingen, E. (2021) PhD supervision in Public Health, Health Prospect: Journal of Public Health 20(1):1-4. https://www.nepjol.info/index.php/HPROSPECT/article/view/32735/28111

Digital Advertising Regulation in the UK

Dear all,

I would like to share with you this very insightful presentation made by Christie and James from the Internet Advertising Bureau (IAB UK).  Could you please watch it and share (link below)your thoughts with me : kkooli@bournemouth.ac.uk? Especially could you share any thoughts about how valuable a BU  IAB membership would be for you.

https://bournemouth.cloud.panopto.eu/Panopto/Pages/Viewer.aspx?id=d1fd0bbc-bb4f-4c4a-bb72-acf400e74669

Regards, Kaouther

ADRC adapting to COVID-19 Part 2

A screenshot from a coffee morning meeting

Dr Michelle Heward in a previous post discussed how BU’s Ageing and Dementia Research Centre (ADRC, @BournemouthADRC) have been engaging with older people to discuss research being undertaken,  pitch new ideas of research we want to undertake, and listen to what this group believe we should be researching.  The first 2 coffee mornings were led by Professor Jane Murphy discussing her research on nutrition, and Professor Jan Weiner discussing his research on wayfinding. The 3rd coffee morning was led by Dr Michele Board discussing how nursing has changed over the last 40 years, and her research exploring the role of Advanced Clinical Practitioners (ACP’s) looking after older people during the COVID19 pandemic. Using pictures to generate discussion those attending discussed their own healthcare journeys and concerns about nurse education. ‘Bring back matron’ and why nurses needed to go to university were questions that generated much discussion. Michele explained that healthcare has dramatically changed since she started nursing. As an example 35 years ago women undergoing a hysterectomy would be in hospital 2 day pre operatively (!) and 10 days post operatively. Today  women will be admitted on the day of their operation and remain in hospital between 1-5 days post op. Another example is in the care of those following a stroke. Patients would be in hospital for a long period of time and sat in ‘buxton chairs’ and tipped back because their balance was poor. Our understanding of post op care, and the care of people following a stroke has increased dramatically in that time, with shorter length of stay (Home is best suggests Board and McCormack 2018), and significantly better patient outcomes. The buxton chair has gone! These advances alongside an ageing population with multi-morbidity, increasing frailty, has led to an increase in acuity of care in acute hospital environments and in the community. Nurses need to be critical thinkers, challenging how we care and what is best for each individual patient. Nurses have to deliver excellent hands on care, with expert holistic assessment and evaluation skills. They lead teams and influence how care should be delivered from the bedside to strategic decision making. For those reasons nurses need to be knowledgeable, to critique the evidence as well as  create the evidence to support how care should be delivered. That is why a university education, supported by 50% of their course in practice settings, is essential. That is the nurse I want to care for me and my loved ones, compassionate, kind, caring, and knowledgeable. To illustrate this further Michele shared examples of the research she is undertaking of the brilliant nurses and allied health professionals working as ACP’s during COVID19. During focus groups and 1-1 interviews the research team (Dr Dawn Morely, Dr Janet Scammell, Kelsie Fletcher,@AN4LTH) and 3 practitioners from Dorset Healthcare, Cliff Kilgore, Mary Edwards and Dr Pippa Collins,@DorsetHealth), heard how the ACP’s advocated for patients, led to the development of services, their responsiveness, flexibility and adaptability during an enormously challenging period  – it was very inspiring. Their advanced critical thinking skills ensured the care they delivered was holistic and person centred. Hopefully those attending the coffee morning were convinced that a university education for nurses and the new role of ACP’s illustrated the expertise of postgraduate nurses delivering care on the front line.

Guest talk from the Internet Advertising Bureau- 23 March at 1pm

Dear all,
Christie and James (Biographies below) from the IAB UK are our guests this coming Tuesday at 1 pm. They kindly accepted to give a talk on “Digital advertising regulation in the UK” to the MSc Marketing Management and MSc Marketing (Digital) students. This talk will provide our students deep insight into the industry of digital advertising.
If you wish to attend, please email me : kkooli@bournemouth.ac.uk and I will send a Zoom invitation.
Regards,
Kaouther

Christie Dennehy-Neil is Head of Policy & Regulatory Affairs at IAB UK, the industry body for digital advertising. She works with the sector to achieve the optimal policy environment to support a sustainable future for digital advertising, and to help boost the understanding of the sector and its benefits within regulatory and political circles. Christie has overall responsibility for the IAB’s work on (self-)regulatory and public policy issues, and public affairs.

James Davies is Public Policy Manager at IAB UK, engaging with politicians and other policy-makers on the digital economy and digital advertising. He was previously Senior Policy Programmes Manager at BCS, the Chartered Institute for IT, where he managed policy initiatives on digital education, the use of personal data and the societal impacts of social media. Prior to this James managed the political news website PoliticsHome.com and worked as a political consultant for Dods.

Come along to SURE to support our students. Wednesday 17 March 1pm

Undergraduate students from across all faculties, including BUBS, will present their work at this year’s SURE. They would love to see you in the audience.
Before Wed March 17th register on eventbrite here
If you want to join on the day, you are welcome to join the conference on MS Teams even if you haven’t registered: www.bournemouth.ac.uk/SURE2021

Conference agenda

  • 13:00 Opening Statement by Conference Co-chairs, Dr Mary Beth Gouthro and Dr Fiona Cownie, Welcome by VC John Vinney
  • 13:15 Keynote ‘Lockdown stories: Digital storytelling and community empowerment’ – Dr Isa Rega, Faculty of Media and Communication
  • 13:50 Session one – Join our breakout channels to watch students present their work
  • 14:50 Coffee break – Join our social channel to chat with other conference attendees
  • 15:15 Session two – Join our breakout channels to watch students present their work
  • 16:15 Coffee break – Join our social channel to chat with other conference attendees
  • 16:30 Keynote ‘Search and Research’ – Dr Lois Farquharson, Samreen Ashraf Bournemouth University Business School
  • 17:00 Summary and prizes with Dr Mary Beth Gouthro, Dr Karen Fowler Watt, Eleanor Wills and Dr Fiona Cownie
  • 17:30 Optional after conference social for those who want to join. Grab yourself a drink and celebrate your success!

The curious start of an academic collaboration

The curious start of an academic collaboration

Two days ago a group of academic from Bournemouth University (BU) submitted a bid for a research grant to the NIHR (National Institute for Health Research) to help prevent the drowning of toddlers in Bangladesh.  The proposed research is a collaboration with the RNLI (Royal National Lifeboat Institution), and an other UK university, the University of the West of England (UWE) and a research organisation called CIPRB (Centre for Injury Prevention and Research, Bangladesh).   Nothing particularly out of the ordinary there.  BU academics submit collaborative bid for research grants all the time, with colleagues at other universities, with large charities (like the RNLI), and with research institutes across the globe.  What I find intriguing is the round-about way this particular collaboration came about within BU.

The NIHR called for research proposals in reply to its Global Health Transformation (RIGHT) programme.  The RNLI approached CIPRB, an expert in accident prevention from UWE and BU experts in health economics and human-centred design to discuss putting in an intention to bid.  The RNLI has a history of working with both CIPRB in Bangladesh on drowning prevention and with BU in various design project (including improved ball bearings for launching lifeboats).  The team decided that it needed a sociologist to help study the social and cultural barriers to the introduction of interventions to prevent drowning in very young toddlers (12-14 months).  My name was mentioned by our UWE colleague whom I know from her work in Nepal.  For example, she and I had spoken at the same trauma conference in Nepal and the lead researcher on her most recent project is one of my former students.

Thus, I was introduced to my BU colleagues in different departments (and faculties) by an outsider from a university miles away.  I think it is also interesting that after twelve years at BU I am introduced to fellow researchers at the RNLI, especially since I only need to step out of my house and walk less than five minutes to see the RNLI headquarters in Poole.

Prof. Edwin van Teijlingen

CMMPH (Centre for Midwifery, Maternal & Perinatal Health)

 

Two new COVID-19 papers in FHSS

Today FHSS Prof. Jonathan Parker published an article (online first) on structural discrimination and abuse associated with COVID-19 in care homes in The Journal of Adult Protection [1].  Whilst Dr. Preeti Mahato, Prof. Edwin van Teijlingen and FHSS Visiting Professor Padam Simkhada had a COVID-19 paper published in the Journal of Midwifery Association of Nepal (JMAN) in late-January 2021 [2], although an electronic copy only reached their email inbox today.

 

  1. Parker, J. (2021) Structural discrimination and abuse: COVID-19 and people in care homes in England and Wales, The Journal of Adult Protection, Online ahead-of-print. https://doi.org/10.1108/JAP-12-2020-0050
  2. Tamang, P., Mahato, P., Simkhada P., Bissell, P., van Teijlingen, E. (2021) Pregnancy, Childbirth, Breastfeeding and Coronavirus Disease: What is known so far? Journal of Midwifery Association of Nepal (JMAN) 2(1): 96-101.

Policy Writing Workshop

If you are interested in having an impact on policy, responding to select committee inquiries or Government consultations you may be interested to attend a free (external) policy writing workshop on 4 March at 17:00. Moving from an academic style of writing to policy writing is an aspect that colleagues can regularly struggle with. The workshop will be led by colleagues from Cambridge University Science and Policy Exchange (CUSPE), alongside Dr Andrew Kaye, Head of International Resilience, at the Government office for Science – All welcome!

Book your place on the workshop through Eventbrite.

Here is the workshop blurb:

Do you want to learn how to influence policy makers and better explain the significance of your research?

This workshop is perfect for anyone seeking to improve their writing skills. We will learn more about writing to support policy development, covering both what civil servants and ministers expect and how to provide the information they really need. This will be an interactive session, including time for Q&A.

Speaker: Dr Andrew Kaye, Head of International Resilience, Government Office for Science

Dr Kaye is currently responsible for coordinating science advice during emergencies. Previously he has been a ministerial speechwriter and worked in government communications. Having completed a PhD in History at the University of Cambridge, Dr Kaye lectured in US history at the Universities of Newcastle and Durham before joining the Civil Service.

New paper published for Bournemouth Professor and former student!

It’s my great pleasure to announce our latest paper published with former BU student, Kelly Veasey, now undertaking her master’s in International Social Policy at the University of Kent and working part-time for Citizen’s Advice. It is published, Open Access, in the Journal of Humanities and Applied Social Sciences. (https://www.emerald.com/insight/2632-279X.htm).

The paper ‘Welfare conditionality, sanctions and homelessness: meanings made by homeless support workers’ is of great relevance in these days of continued austerity compounded by the pandemic. Based on Kelly’s undergraduate research, the open access paper explores homeless-support workers’ perceptions of homeless welfare recipients and their experiences of navigating new conditions placed upon them by UK welfare reform. It examines support workers’ views of the most punitive feature of the welfare system, sanctions, on those recipients. In 2012, the Conservative and Liberal Democrat Coalition Government introduced the largest and most radical overhaul of the UK benefit system, significantly increasing the level of conditionality and sanctions for noncompliance, part of a shift in welfare, suggesting that rights must be balanced by responsibility and the “culture of worklessness” and “benefit dependency” should be addressed. We reviewed welfare reforms in the UK and the increased use of sanctions as part of welfare conditionality. Data were collected from eight semi-structured interviews taking place in five housing support groups in the South East and South West of England in 2019–2020. Findings from our study indicate that the government’s reforms serve as a disciplinary measure for the poor, reinforcing inequality and social marginalization. To mitigate the effects would require a comprehensive review of universal credit prior to its full rollout to claimants. While welfare conditionality, welfare reform and homeless are well-researched in the UK, this paper fills a gap in research concerning the experiences of those working in housing support agencies working with homeless people in the UK.

The full text is accessible by following this link DOI 10.1108/JHASS-12-2020-0213.

Do you have a research in the area of emissions, Climate Change or Transport?

As Guest Editor of the journal Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433, SCIE, IF 2.397), I would like to invite you to submit a paper to the Special Issue ” Transport Emissions: Theoretical and Empirical Considerations in light of COP”.

Details of the Special Issue can be found below:
——————————————————————
Special Issue: Transport Emissions: Theoretical and Empirical Considerations in light of COP

Website: https://www.mdpi.com/journal/atmosphere/special_issues/transport_theoretical_empirical_cop

Guest Editor: Dr. Festus Adedoyin (Bournemouth University, UK); Professor Daniel Balsalobre-Lorente (Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Spain); and Dr. Oana Madalina Driha (Universidad de Alicante, Spain)

Deadline for manuscript submissions: *13 August 2021*
——————————————————————

Atmosphere is fully open access. Open access (unlimited and free access by readers) increases publicity and promotes more frequent citations, as indicated by several studies. Atmosphere is indexed by the key research databases; further details may be found at https://www.mdpi.com/journal/atmosphere/indexing. All papers go through a thorough but rapid peer-review process. Papers can be submitted at any time up until the deadline as they will be published on an ongoing basis. The article processing charge (APC) is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs) per accepted paper in 2021. https://www.mdpi.com/journal/atmosphere/apc).

If you are interested in contributing, please send me a short abstract or tentative title in advance for initial checking and the expected submission date for our reference.

We would also appreciate it if you could forward this to your team members and colleagues who may also be interested. Thank you for your consideration and please do not hesitate to contact me if you have any questions or suggestions.

New BU reproductive health paper

Congratulations to Dr. Pramod Regmi (Lecturer in International Health) in the Department of Nursing Sciences on today’s publication of ‘The unmet needs for modern family planning methods among postpartum women in Sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review of the literature’ [1].  The paper in the international peer-reviewed journal Reproductive Health is co-produced with BU MSc Public Health graduate Jumaine Gahungu and Dr. Mariam Vahdaninia who left the Faculty of Health & Social Sciences in mid-2020. 

Well done.

Prof. Edwin van Teijlingen

CMMPH

 

Reference:

  1. Gahungu, J., Vahdaninia, M. & Regmi, P. (2021) The unmet needs for modern family planning methods among postpartum women in Sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review of the literature. Reprod Health 18, 35   https://doi.org/10.1186/s12978-021-01089-9

Congratulations to Prof. Jonathan Parker

Congratulations to Professor Jonathan Parker on his latest publication ‘By Dint of History: Ways in which social work is (re)defined by historical and social events‘.  This interesting paper is co-authored with Magnus Frampton from the Universität Vechta in Germany and published in the international journal Social Work & Society.

 

Reference:

  1.  Parker, J., Frampton, M. (2020) By Dint of History: Ways in which social work is (re)defined by historical and social events, Social Work & Society, Volume 18, Issue 3: 1-17.

 

 

Specialist Adviser to International Trade Committee opportunity

The International Trade Committee (ITC) is calling for expressions of interest in becoming a Specialist Adviser to the Committee, to support its scrutiny of UK trade negotiations. The role is a rare opportunity to influence policy, broaden your research horizons, and create impact suitable for REF purposes. 

The role of the Trade Committee, within the House of Commons, is to scrutinise the spending, administration and policy of the Department for International Trade (DIT), and other associated public bodies. It is made up of the Chair (Angus Brendan MacNeil MP) and ten other MPs.

The Inquiry

The DIT is currently negotiating Free Trade Agreements (FTAs) with the US, Australia and New Zealand. In addition, the Government is expected to apply to accede to the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership. Further trade negotiations are likely to begin soon, as the Government pursues its objective of having 80% of UK trade covered by FTAs within the next three years.

The ITC is conducting an open-ended inquiry into UK trade negotiations, as a means of scrutinising these FTA negotiations.

The Role

The Committee is seeking to appoint a number of Specialist Advisers with relevant expertise in trade policy and trade law to support the Committee with FTA scrutiny on an ad hoc basis. The successful candidates may be asked to:

  • work with the Committee secretariat to identify and analyse the relevant issues for the Committee raised by individual FTAs;
  • contribute to briefings and draft reports for the Committee and comment on drafts of written material produced by the Committee secretariat;
  • advise on sources of information and evidence, including potential witnesses; and
  • attend Committee meetings and provide oral briefings when required.

The role will involve attendance at Committee meetings. Currently this would be virtually, but may involve physical meetings in Westminster in the future, depending on circumstances. The Committee will meet the necessary expenses for attendance at meetings or other work related to the role. The names of Specialist Advisers, and any relevant declarations of interests, will be published in any reports with which Advisers have been involved.

There is uncertainty around the timescales for FTA negotiations. The Committee wishes to appoint Advisers now who will be available to advise it as and when required, as negotiations progress. The time commitment for an advisory role to a Committee is unpredictable however it is not expected to exceed 20 days in a calendar year. Advisers will not generally be required to work more than two days in any one week – but there may be times when short periods of very intense work are required. Advisers are paid a daily honorarium on the basis of work done.

The Committee is keen to hear from applicants from a wide range of backgrounds, including those who have not previously engaged with Parliament or Select Committees.

Please engage with the BU policy team (policy@bournemouth.ac.uk) and seek permission from your Faculty before making an application. There is a contact at the Committee if you wish to find out more.

The deadline for application (a CV, covering letter (max 2 sides), and a declaration of interests) is midnight on Friday 5 March 2021.