Recent articles..

Collaboration in Malaysia – BU and INTI-IU, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Posted in Uncategorized by cclark

Dr Carol Clark and Dr Judith Chapman visited INTL-International University, Nilai, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia following a visit at the end of 2014 by Professor Tim McIntyre-Batty. The faculty of Health currently consists of one programme – Physiotherapy BSc (Hons). Colleagues at INTL-IU wish to expand their provision of health science programmes and their research profile. Carol and Judith met with some of the faculty including Dato’ Professor Rahmah Mohamed – Dean of the Faculty of Health and VC of INTL-IU, Professor Narasimman Swaminathan – Head of Research and Praveen Surendran – Head of Physiotherapy Programme. Primarily to discuss similar research interests, physiotherapy programmes in Malaysia and the UK and provision of additional health related programmes for example; public health, nutrition and paramedic science. We found we had a lot of common ground and put together a paper setting out ideas relating to future collaborative work.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carol and Judith joined Dato’ Professor Rahmah Mohamed the Dean of the Faculty of Health and VC of INTL-IU and colleagues from the faculty for an evening of entertainment. We were introduced to Malaysian culture in the form of dancing and cuisine and were made to feel very welcome.

 

Carol and Judith facilitated a work shop highlighting the importance of Physical activity in the prevention of non-communicable diseases including Metabolic Syndrome. Non-communicable diseases account for over two thirds of the global health burden in relation to mortality and morbidity. The non-communicable diseases include: diabetes, heart and lung diseases, stroke, some cancers and dementia. In Malaysia the prevalence of diabetes is 10% and increasing while metabolic syndrome in the > 30 year olds is between 24% – 47% and ethnically dependent. With a growing elderly population and rising obesity the burden of non-communicable diseases has increased significantly in Malaysia in the last 10-15 years. The aim of the workshop was to explore how Physiotherapists might influence and engage in the promotion of physical activity through the lifespan by considering the motivators and barriers in Malaysia.
Students from two universities (INTL- IU and Ramsay Sime Darby University) attended the workshop and shared their own levels of physical activity and explored ideas relating to increasing physical activity engagement amongst different groups in Malaysia in the future.

Dr Carol Clark, Dr Judith Chapman (Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, BU) Professor Narasimman Swaminathan and Praveen Surendran (Faculty of Health, INTI-IU)

An Overview on the Design and Analysis of Collaborative Decision Making Games

We would like to invite you to the next research seminar of the Creative Technology Research Centre.

 

Speaker: Dr Aida AzadeganCollaborative Decision Making

 

Title:   An Overview on the Design and Analysis of Collaborative Decision Making Games

 

Time: 2:00PM-3:00PM

Date: Wednesday 27th May 2015

Room: P302 LT, Poole House, Talbot Campus

 

Abstract: Collaborative games require players to work together on shared activities to achieve a common goal. These games received widespread interest in the past decade, yet little is known on how to design them successfully, as well as how to evaluate or analyse them.

 

This talk will describe a research project that aims to deliver a better understanding of collaborative processes designed in the mechanics of Collaborative Decision Making Games (CDMGs) in which collaboration takes place during the game play process at conscious cognitive level. To follow the aim, Collaboration Engineering (CE), a discipline that has studied collaboration for decades is used as a theoretical guideline to analyse and design CDMGs. At the analysis stage of this research, the primary focus is on understanding how CE is used in the design of the mechanics of CDMGs and within the design stage the goal is to demonstrate a pattern-based approach, developed using CE principles, which is then applied to the design of these games.

 

Potential insights from this research make clear in what contexts CE is relevant and what kind of role it can play both in terms of analysis and the design of CDMGs.

 

 

We hope to see you there.

AiR – being creative at the Social Research Association conference

Posted in BU research by anne quinney

 

AiR presenters

Five members of the AiR (Arts in Research) collaborative delivered an experiential workshop at the Social Research Association conference on Creative Research Methods in the Social Sciences on Friday 8th May at the British Library, (Left to right: Anne Quinney, Maggie Hutchings, Caroline Ellis-HIll, Wendy Couchman and Michelle Cannon).  The conference brought together researchers from a diverse range of disciplines including human geography, criminal justice, media, and migration studies. By inviting the delegates to create a sculpture in pipe-cleaners of their journey to the conference, the keynote speaker, Professor David Gauntlett from the University of Westminster, set the scene for an interactive and inspirational day in which presenters shared their creative research methods.

Drawing on the two day workshop, A past/a present, held at BU in September 2014, the collaborative shared their experiences and invited the audience to learn what it feels like to reveal our often most private self to an unfamiliar person by talking about the significance of a personal artefact that they had with them. The participants found it to be a very powerful process which can occur in a very short space of time.
As well as learning about collage as a research tool in working with offenders, the use of hand drawn timelines in working with returning Afghan migrants, walking as a tool for understanding marginalised young men, and walking to develop understanding the day to day lives of women asylum seekers, the AiR collaboration members made new connections and explored several potential research collaborations.
The ARTS in Research (AiR) collaborative is open to BU students and staff across faculties and disciplines. Please contact the AiR facilitator, Dr Kip Jones, (kipworld@gmail.com) to join.
https://research.bournemouth.ac.uk/2014/01/arts-in-research-air/

“What do you get out of your student-staff co-created research experience?”

 

 

“What do you get out of your student-staff co-created research experience?”

This was a question reflected on by the SciTech student and staff recipients of this year’s CEL Co-creation student projects.  Five level H(6) students in SciTec won CEL co-creation bursaries this year to work with academic staff (Figure 1). Here we share their individual experiences and their overall reflection.

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 1.  Faculty of Science & Technology student and staff winners of the 2015 CEL-funded Co-creation Projects. Left to right – Matthew Kidd, Tom Barnham, Dominick Jay, Kevin McGhee, Emilie Hardouin, Emma Hill, Keith Pretty, Simon Harding.

INDIVIDUAL EXPERIENCES

Project 1  – Emma Hill.  LabTube – a series of video protocols for the DNA lab equipment. The aim of the co-creation project that I am involved in is to produce a series of instructive videos on the equipment within the DNA laboratory. This will allow students to remind themselves of the protocol of a specific piece of equipment and so feel confident to continue their work without needing a supervisor present every time they use something. Working on this project has allowed me to learn new skills from experienced members of staff from varying scientific backgrounds, and gain hands on experience with equipment that I wouldn’t have had much interaction with on my course. It’s great to know I’ve been able to help produce a resource to be used by students for years to come.

Academic Mentor reflection for Project 1 – Kevin McGhee. This award is yet another great initiative by BU, promoting the development of our students’ skills for future employment through projects which enhance the lab experience for all of us

Project 2 – Simon Harding. The role, contribution and management of student social media groups as part of the learning experience at BU. I worked with the Learning Technology team and my supervisor Keith Pretty as part of my co-creation project. The aim was to investigate the role of student social media groups and how they can contribute towards the student learning experience.  Creation of student guidance will give students the knowledge and tools to utilise student social media groups. The solution will also make recommendations for the university when integrating social media groups. Working closely with my supervisor and the rest of the co-creation team I held data collection event with BU students to gather data on their perspectives of student social media groups. The team work helped to make the data collection event a success. Collaborative work with my supervisor has given me new skills and improved my experience which I will take with me when I finish university and pursue my career in the computing industry.

Project 3 – Matthew Kidd. Adoption and implementation of BLE Beacon technology at Bournemouth University to enhance open, collaborative learning opportunities. I worked closely with Keith Pretty and the learning technology team for my co-creation project.  The aim was to investigate the feasibility for implementing a new emerging technology: BLE Beacons into the learning environment. It was identified that students are bringing their mobile devices onto campus with many intending to use them to support with studies. Yet research has found that many students find the devices a distraction with some unsure on how to effectively use them in learning. It has been discovered that whilst infrastructure and services exist little has been done to integrate them into the learning experience; BLE beacons have an opportunity to shape this. By working on a co-creation project I have had the opportunity to work with stakeholders which are critical to the deployment of new technologies, this relationship has enabled a much broader understanding for the operation of the University and has enabled me to develop new skills throughout the process.

Project 4 – Dominick Jay. iBU Student Informing Feature Development. I worked with my supervisor and the iBU technical team with the end goal being the identification and development of a feature prototype for the iBU application. This prototype was evaluated at both the initial and design stages by fellow students, and after development by the iBU team. Events took place allowing for critical feedback to be delivered from students in response to design ideas. Using co-creation this year has introduced a unique way of working, and has helped improve how I work both as a team and individually.

Project 5 – Tom Barnham.  A Utility, Usability and User Experience Evaluation of the iBU Mobile Application. My co-creation project was based on a user evaluation of the iBU application, which required participants to conduct tests. Keith Pretty helped me structure my project and plan the most essential part of the project which was to conduct a user evaluation experiment. We were able to meet key contacts that could provide valuable information including the iBU development team. The client was Stuart Claw and provided useful information and always swiftly replied to emails.

Academic Mentor reflection for Projects 2, 3, 4 & 5 – Keith Pretty.

This co-creation funding has offered a fantastic opportunity to work with students on projects that have a direct influence on the learning experience, through building on our use of Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) and the iBU mobile application. Key BU teams were brought into help shape the four projects from the outset, acting as clients for each student to work with. This has enabled the sharing and application of a wide range of skills and experience, plus the opportunity for networking between the iBU, Learning Technology, library and other teams within the university. I already work with most of these teams regularly as part of my own teaching and learning development projects, but the students have brought in new perspectives and insights into our use of TEL that have enabled the outcomes of these projects to be stronger.

I would like to take this opportunity to not only thank CEL and Tom, Simon, Dominick and Matt for creating a great learning opportunity for us all, but also the time, dedication and effort that the iBU and Learning Technology teams have put into their roles as clients to support the students. In particular, David Fevyer and Stephen Pyne from the Learning Technology team and Stuart Claw and Philip Downes from the iBU team.  I have enjoyed working with everyone immensely and recommend other staff to take up future opportunities for co-creation that will be on offer.

OVERALL REFLECTIONS

The student and staff co-creators were invited to spend a few minutes of an informal, celebratory session capturing on posit notes their responses to the question “What do you get out of your student-staff co-created research experience?” (Table 1).  I have colour coded some of their responses to indicate how they might match gains in all three of the spheres of learning for effective citizenship (Figure 2).

Table 1. Replies to the question “What do you get out of your student-staff co-created research experience?”.  Colour codes indicate matches with spheres of learning of cognitive maturity (yellow), integrated identity (blue) and mature relationships (pink).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 2. The core spheres of learning for effective citizenship (based on Baxter Magolda & King, 2004)

There is a growing global interest in 21st century education creating effective citizenship through fostering the underpinning personal development  towards “Self Authorship”  –  i.e. the ability to  collect, interpret, and analyze information and reflect on one’s own beliefs in order to form judgments” (Baxter Magolda, 2007).  The reflections of the students and staff co-creators in the above projects suggests that research co-creation is a great way of enhancing the whole BU university learning experience and developing effective global citizenship. It is also great fun. We hope you feel inspired to get co-creating research too!

Complied by Ant Diaz, CEL theme leader for student engagement & co-creation. adiaz@bmth.ac.uk

References.

Baxter Magolda, M. B., & King, P. M. (2004) (Eds) Learning partnerships: Theory and models of practice to educate for self-authorship. Sterling, VA: Stylus

Baxter Magolda, M. B. (2007). Self‐authorship: The foundation for twenty‐first‐century education. New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 2007(109), 69-83.

 

BRIAN Announcement to Faculty and Staff

We are happy to inform you that Bournemouth Research Information and Networking System (BRIAN) will be upgrading to a new version. The system will be offline from 8.30am, 20th May 2015 on Wednesday, and will hopefully be restored and functioning fully on the 26th May 2015, 8.30am.

Some of the benefits of this upgrade are:

  • Re-designed Deposit Page

 

The page shown when you deposit a publication to BURO has been completely redesigned to improve the flow through the page, to allow entry of an Open access location and to provide more visible guidance.

  • Assistance when adding publications, including duplicate prevention

 

This is a completely new mechanism designed to assist you and your co-authors when manually adding new works to BRIAN. The first step in this process is to perform a search using the title, partial title or identifier (ISBN or DOI). Using this information, records that already exist in BRIAN may then be claimed by you or your co-author, thereby avoiding the creation of unnecessary manual records.

The new mechanism applies to all publication types. In addition, for Books and Journal articles, searches are also performed against a number of external data sources (including Google Books).

  • Harvest publications using Scopus Author Identifier

   

We are happy to announce that in the new version of BRIAN, it is now possible to add a verified Scopus Author Identifier to your account (through ‘search settings’) which will result in all publications linked to the Scopus ID being automatically imported to BRIAN in a claimed state.

  • Improved Photo Cropping Mechanism

This new photo crop mechanism allows you to drag and drop photos in for use and it will also allow you to crop the pictures to the desired style.

We do apologise for the inconvenience but we hope that these exciting new features will be up and running for you to use on the 26th May.

All relevant guidance notes on the Staff Intranet will be updated in due course. If you need any help using the new system or if you encounter any problems after the upgrade, please do send an email to BRIAN@bournemouth.ac.uk and a member of staff will be able to assist you.

Monthly BRIAN training sessions will also start taking place beginning June 2015. Please watch out for announcement on future dates on the RKEO Research blog.

In the meantime, if you do have queries relating to the upgrade, please feel free to get in touch with Pengpeng Hatch at pphatch@bournemouth.ac.uk (01202 961354).

Inter-professional Education Dementia Themed Study Day

Last Friday we delivered the second dementia themed study day for the undergraduate students in the Faculty of Health and Social Sciences. In total about 500 students attended over the 2 days. Students from adult nursing, mental health nursing, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, social worker, nutritional students, Operating Department Practitioners attended.

The aim of the day was for the students to gain an insight into the lived experience of dementia and see the person beyond the diagnosis. The humanising values framework underpins the undergraduate courses and the students were encouraged to consider how they can deliver humanised care and avoid de-humanised care, when caring for people with dementia.

There were a range of sessions and delivery styles that engaged the students throughout the day. A carer spoke with compassion about how she looks after her husband who has Alzheimer’s, the students felt this insight would encourage then to work more closely with family members. Throughout the day many speakers showed films of people with dementia talking about their experiences, the students feel as a result of seeing these they will take more time to hear the voice of the person they are looking after. Working in pairs the students shared an aspect of their life story with each other. By doing this they were able to consider the value of individual life history in supporting the person with dementia.

There were further sessions sharing some of the research the faculty are undertaking with people with dementia. For example Dr Jane Murphy discussed her work around nutrition and offered some very practical tips that the students can take to practice to assist a person with dementia with their diet. Dr Michelle Heward from BUDI shared some of the innovative work being undertaken by this team. The day concluded with a presentation by the Alzheimer’s society, very timely in light of this being Dementia Awareness week.

One of the highlights for many students was a role play by five different health care professionals (Dr Bethan Collins,(OT), Carol Clark and Debbie Neal, (physio), Sheeran Zsigo and  Margarete Parrish (Social workers), Lesley Elcock and John Tarrant (ODP), Michele Board (Nurse)), who discussed their individual roles when caring for a person with dementia. This emphasised to the students the importance of collaboration when caring for a person with dementia.  Health and social care is too often fragmented, with services based on professional and institutional boundaries when it should be co-ordinated around the needs of patients. Following the Care Act 2014 a duty was placed on local authorities to promote the integration of care and support services with health services.  The role play demonstrated to the students the importance of integrated care and the interprofessional team working (and playing) together!

There were many positive comments from students including this one from an adult nursing student,

“Just wanted to say a huge thank you for today. Personally I feel this course has started with a bang and it’s been a shock. Todays reminded me why I’m doing this and its made feel more determined to keep working hard. So thank you for that”.

Michele Board, Senior Lecturer Nursing Older People.

Upcoming CfE Event: Your Brand is your BIGGEST Asset!

Thursday 11 June 2015
5:30pm arrival for a 6pm start
Executive Business Centre, Bournemouth University, 89 Holdenhurst Road, Bournemouth BH8 8EB

Have you ever considered whether you are making the most of your brand? Do you treat your brand as a valuable business asset?

Our team of experienced academic consultants at BU invite you to join them for a thought provoking seminar and hear ideas around branding as a strategic asset. The session will consider key issues such as brand identity, image and values and the role that your consumers can play in co-creating brand experiences.

This is a free event for businesses, BU students, BU staff and BU Alumni so the perfect chance to network! Refreshments will be provided, to find out more or to book your place please click here

BRIAN Announcement to Faculty and Staff

We are happy to inform you that Bournemouth Research Information and Networking System (BRIAN) will be upgrading to a new version. The system will be offline from 8.30am, 20th May 2015 on Wednesday, and will hopefully be restored and functioning fully on the 26th May 2015, 8.30am.

Some of the benefits of this upgrade are:

  • Re-designed Deposit Page

The page shown when you deposit a publication to BURO has been completely redesigned to improve the flow through the page, to allow entry of an Open access location and to provide more visible guidance.

  • Assistance when adding publications, including duplicate prevention

This is a completely new mechanism designed to assist you and your co-authors when manually adding new works to BRIAN. The first step in this process is to perform a search using the title, partial title or identifier (ISBN or DOI). Using this information, records that already exist in BRIAN may then be claimed by you or your co-author, thereby avoiding the creation of unnecessary manual records.

The new mechanism applies to all publication types. In addition, for Books and Journal articles, searches are also performed against a number of external data sources (including Google Books).

  • Harvest publications using Scopus Author Identifier

 

 

We are happy to announce that in the new version of BRIAN, it is now possible to add a verified Scopus Author Identifier to your account (through ‘search settings’) which will result in all publications linked to the Scopus ID being automatically imported to BRIAN in a claimed state.

  • Improved Photo Cropping Mechanism

This new photo crop mechanism allows you to drag and drop photos in for use and it will also allow you to crop the pictures to the desired style.

We do apologise for the inconvenience but we hope that these exciting new features will be up and running for you to use on the 26th May.

All relevant guidance notes on the Staff Intranet will be updated in due course. If you need any help using the new system or if you encounter any problems after the upgrade, please do send an email to BRIAN@bournemouth.ac.uk and a member of staff will be able to assist you.

Monthly BRIAN training sessions will also start taking place beginning June 2015. Please watch out for announcement on future dates on the RKEO Research blog.

In the meantime, if you do have queries relating to the upgrade, please feel free to get in touch with Pengpeng Hatch at pphatch@bournemouth.ac.uk (01202 961354).

BU’s research website nominated for a Heist Award

Bournemouth University’s research website has been nominated for a Heist Award for ‘best digital or social initiative’.  Heist Awards celebrate the best examples of marketing across the higher education sector and exist to exist to recognise and celebrate the professionalism, expertise and innovation that found throughout the sector, from the smallest regional college, to global education brands.

BU’s research website was refreshed and re-launched over a year ago and has since become a valuable source of news and updates about research going on at BU.  The site is very much owned by academics and researchers, who have responsibility for adding and editing their own content – as the people closest to research, we believe they are best qualified to talk about their work.

With new and exciting content being added every week, the site has become an active hub of information about BU’s research.

The full nomination list can be read here.

Results will be announced on 9th July.

Knowledge Transfer Partnerships – Current Associate Vacancies

Following on from recent success, we have had five Knowledge Transfer Partnerships (KTP) awarded over the past few months.  Several of these are in recruitment, with a few more coming into the recruitment stage shortly.  It’s been a rather busy time within the world of KTP at BU!

We have two vacancies at local Poole-based business, TDSi and one in Southampton with civil engineering company, R&W Engineering.

As we have a large cohort of final year students finishing their exams shortly, this is an ideal opportunity to advertise these positions to our final year students.

 

Poole-based vacancies at TDSi

Software Test Engineer – Salary up to £25,000 – 13 month fixed term contract with a possibility of the offer of permanent employment

Firmware Development Engineer – Salary up to £25,000 – 11 month fixed term contract with a possibility of the offer of permanent employment

 

Southampton-based vacancy at R&W Engineering

IT Systems Engineer – Salary of £25,000 (negotiable) – 25 month fixed term contract with a possibility of the offer of permanent employment

 

I encourage colleagues to share these job adverts amongst their networks as these are fantastic projects and will provide excellent personal and professional development for the successful candidates.

 

For KTP enquiries, please contact Rachel Clarke, KE Adviser (KTP) on 61347 or email clarker@bournemouth.ac.uk

 

New Report Exposes Significant Gender Gap in Tourism Academic Leadership

Results of a new research report The Gender Gap in the Tourism Academy: Statistics and Indicators of Gender Equality reveal that women are under-represented in the majority of leadership and gatekeeping positions examined and that academic organisations continue to show highly gendered patterns.

The research project, produced by an international group of twelve tourism academics known as ”While Waiting for the Dawn”, shows that while women account for nearly half of tourism academics, only 13% of fellows of the prestigious ”International Academy for the Study of Tourism” are women. From over 6000 editorial positions analysed in 189 journals, there are only 25% of women holding top-editorial positions and the gender gap intensifies in the top 20 journals in the field (where women representation is only 21%). A similar under-representation appears among invited speakers at conferences. Among all the invited speakers of the 33 international conferences analysed only 24% are women. Conferences with a complete absence of women as invited/keynote speakers are quite common (almost one third had an all-male line up of invited speakers).

This is the first report that maps the gender gap in tourism studies. The analysis confirms similar results of other national and international studies that show men continue to be over-represented among the gatekeepers who set the academic and research agendas.

“It is a shocking wake-up call, especially for early career researchers. It pushes us to think about what it is to be an academic and how we can use our agency to break the gendered glass ceiling” says Elaine Yang, PhD Candidate at Griffith Business School and the administrator of the online community ”Women Academics in Tourism”.

Many studies of gender in research rely on national or regional labour statistics (e.g. EU), but a distinguishing feature of this report is that the data analysed takes into consideration the global nature of academic networks. It reveals that the gender glass ceiling exists not only in relation to professorships, but it extends to other forms of academic titles and leadership positions. Academic leadership is contextual to specific research communities and besides mapping career progression, it is crucial to establish other indicators to monitor gendered patterns in gate-keeping and high visibility positions in global networks.

Ana María Munar, Associate Professor at Copenhagen Business School, who coordinated this research project said ”We hope this report will help to raise awareness and contribute to creating a more just academy, where women have equal opportunities to shape the present and the future of tourism scholarship”.

 A vodcast of this report and the full report can be accessed here: https://sites.google.com/site/tourismeducationfutures/about-tefi/gender-equity-in-the-tourism-ac

For questions and further information about this report, please contact:

 While Waiting for the Dawn, UK:

Avital Biran, abiran@bournemouth.ac.uk

Donna Chambers, donna.chambers@sunderland.ac.uk

ORCID – Have you got one?

©Pengpeng Hatch. All copyrights reserved.

For those of you who have heard about ORCID but are not entirely sure what it is, a short introduction below might help you to understand its efforts more.

ORCID is an international, interdisciplinary, open, not-for-profit organisation. Its core function is to provide a registry of unique, persistent, and resolvable person identifiers together with web services to enable interoperability through integration of identifiers into research systems and workflows.

The core issues underlying the ORCID initiative are the effective and appropriate identification of individuals who participate in the research community, and linking individuals with their research outputs, activities and affiliations. Solving this problem makes individuals more discoverable and assists researchers in finding resources and collaborators to support their work. Linking the researcher identifier with research outputs, activities, affiliations and other existing person identifiers extends interoperability and supports reporting.

Currently, Bournemouth University does not have an organisational membership to ORCID but the registry is free to use for individual researchers, which means that you can visit the ORCID website and obtain an ORCID identifier for free to manage your record of activities, and search for others in the registry. ORCID also offers several APIs that allow systems to connect to the ORCID registry and some API functions are freely available.

If you have signed up or intend to sign up to have an ORCID registry, we would like to hear from you please so if you could email Pengpeng Hatch with YOUR FULLNAME and YOUR ORCID ID that would be much appreciated.

Many thanks in advance for your help.

 

Have you checked out the interactive Research Lifecycle diagram yet?

If you haven’t then you most definitely should! Our Research Lifecycle diagram is a jazzy new interactive part of the BU Research Blog that shows the support and initiatives that are available to staff and students at each stage of the research lifecycle. The information is general enough so as to apply to all disciplines and you can use it to organize and identify the many activities involved in your research. You can explore the Research Lifecycle to find information on how to get started with:

1. Developing your research strategy

2. Developing your proposal

3. The research process

4. Publication and dissemination

5. Impact

RKEO will be adding to the Research Lifecycle to ensure it always contains the most up to date information to support you with planning, organising and undertaking your research.

You can access the diagram from the links in this post or from the menu bar that appears on all screens in the Research Blog.

 

BRIAN Announcement to Faculty and Staff

We are happy to inform you that Bournemouth Research Information and Networking System (BRIAN) will be upgrading to a new version. The system will be offline from 8.30am, 20th May 2015 on Wednesday, and will hopefully be restored and functioning fully on the 26th May 2015, 8.30am.

Some of the benefits of this upgrade are:

  • Re-designed Deposit Page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The page shown when you deposit a publication to BURO has been completely redesigned to improve the flow through the page, to allow entry of an Open access location and to provide more visible guidance.

  • Assistance when adding publications, including duplicate prevention

 

 

 

 

 

This is a completely new mechanism designed to assist you and your co-authors when manually adding new works to BRIAN. The first step in this process is to perform a search using the title, partial title or identifier (ISBN or DOI). Using this information, records that already exist in BRIAN may then be claimed by you or your co-author, thereby avoiding the creation of unnecessary manual records.

The new mechanism applies to all publication types. In addition, for Books and Journal articles, searches are also performed against a number of external data sources (including Google Books).

  • Harvest publications using Scopus Author Identifier

 

 

We are happy to announce that in the new version of BRIAN, it is now possible to add a verified Scopus Author Identifier to your account (through ‘search settings’) which will result in all publications linked to the Scopus ID being automatically imported to BRIAN in a claimed state.

  • Improved Photo Cropping Mechanism

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This new photo crop mechanism allows you to drag and drop photos in for use and it will also allow you to crop the pictures to the desired style.

We do apologise for the inconvenience but we hope that these exciting new features will be up and running for you to use on the 26th May.

All relevant guidance notes on the Staff Intranet will be updated in due course. If you need any help using the new system or if you encounter any problems after the upgrade, please do send an email to BRIAN@bournemouth.ac.uk and a member of staff will be able to assist you.

Monthly BRIAN training sessions will also start taking place beginning June 2015. Please watch out for announcement on future dates on the RKEO Research blog.

In the meantime, if you do have queries relating to the upgrade, please feel free to get in touch with Pengpeng Hatch at pphatch@bournemouth.ac.uk (01202 961354).

What do Fishbone, Amusement Park and Apigee have in common?

They are all tools for digital storytelling. On Thursday May 14th, the Fusion-funded, inter-faculty BU Datalabs team presented at Interdisciplinary Research Week. Guests from across the University and beyond came to learn about digital storytelling and how visual data stories can better communicate the significance of research findings to policy-makers and the public.

Weathering the rain, the event kicked off with a reflective exercise called ‘Analogue Twitter.’ Participants were asked to write down a story of their research in 140 characters or less. From sports management to midwifery, research stories spanned the disciplines.

To get things going, Senior Lecturer in Digital Storytelling, Dr. Brad Gyori brought his expertise in interactive media, and his experience as the Head Writer of the Emmy award winning show Talk Soup, to introduce the audience to the many storytelling patterns that have emerged with the rise and innovation of digital platforms. Digital storytelling can range from Fishbone narratives that have one main linear narrative with suggested diversions, to the Amusement Park that offers loosely clustered, different perspectives with no central hub, as we see in Highrise: Out of my Window.

Next up, Dr. Anna Feigenbaum, a Senior Lecturer from the Faculty of Media and Communications, introduced the audience to the power of storytelling with maps and infographics. Drawing from her own tear gas project and others’ expertise, she explored how visuals can act as ‘infobait’, drive curiosity, and interrupt dominant narratives.

After lunch, BU Datalabs project partner Malachy Browne from the social media journalism outfit reportedly shared insights and strategies for using online tools to do investigative research, share your findings, and dig deeper into social data. From apigee for APIs to mine social media data, to wolframalpha that can return the weather from any date in history, Browne made connections between the tools of his trade and the possibilities for expanding our digital methods in academia.

For more information on the BU Datalabs project, email: afeigenbaum@bournemouth.ac.uk  If you would like to get involved, we will be hosting a meeting open to all staff and students in early July. Details to follow. 

Fusion Fund – Study Leave – Manuscript submitted

A little while back (August 2014-Jan 2015) I had Fusion Investment study leave to work on my manuscript ‘Straight Girls and Queer Guys: the Hetero Media Gaze in Film and Television’.  Just wanted to follow up from this, to advise that the manuscript has now been submitted to Edinburgh University Press, and its on its way for production.  I expect it will be a few months before its eventually published, but its such a relief to actually finish it.  The research process was most engaging, and as with all concepts it changes and modifies, as a ‘work in progress’.

Here is a taster of the agreed back cover:

“Exploring the archetypal representation of the straight girl with the queer guy in film and television culture from 1948 to the present day, Straight Girls and Queer Guys considers the process of the ‘hetero media gaze’ and the way it contextualizes sexual diversity and gender identity. Offering both an historical foundation and a rigorous conceptual framework, Christopher Pullen draws on a range of case studies, including the films of Doris Day and Rock Hudson, the performances of Kenneth Williams, televisions shows such as Glee, Sex and the City and Will and Grace, the work of Derek Jarman, and the role of the gay best friend in Hollywood film. Critiquing the representation of the straight girl and the queer guy for its relation to both power and otherness, this is a provocative study that frames a theoretical model which can be applied across diverse media forms.”

Now I am on to my next book project, the educational biography of Pedro Zamora.

ResearchGate – An Overview

Picture by bschwehnLast year I wrote a post titled ‘ResearchGate Reviewed’ which outlined the pros and cons for BU researchers using ResearchGate. Here again I thought I’d summarise here what ResearchGate is and more importantly what it isn’t…

ResearchGate in a nutshell…..

ResearchGate is a social networking site for researchers (particularly those engaged in broadly scientific research) to share papers, ask questions and find collaborators.

What is it?

ResearchGate’s mission is “to connect researchers and make it easy for them to share and access scientific output, knowledge, and expertise”. It has similar features to networking sites such as Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn where users can create profiles, like and follow researchers and their publications, ask questions, feedback and share news items and updates.

It is free to join and currently has about 6 million members across the world. Once you have a profile, ResearchGate will email you with publication updates from those researchers you are following and developments in your skilled areas of research. On your home page it will include a live feed of activity from your connected researchers, display jobs you may be interested in and suggest connections to related researchers.

What isn’t it?

Accessing documents usually requires an account so ResearchGate is not considered to be Open Access.

(Why) should I use it?

ResearchGate is growing fast and is a useful tool for researchers to promote their work. However, if a researcher’s sole aim is promote their work then ResearchGate alone will probably not be sufficient and they should also consider using ResearchGate in conjunction with other sites such as Academia.edu, Mendeley, Google Scholar, figshare and others. Activity and membership varies from one site to another and from one discipline to another, so researchers will need to investigate for themselves in order to evaluate potential value.

Uploading research outputs to ResearchGate will not meet funder policy requirements for Open Access or Research Data Management; on the contrary you may be in breach of the publisher policy.

ResearchGate was built by scientists for scientists in 2008 and has received more than $35 million in investment capital over its lifetime from investors such as Bill Gates and Tenaya Capital.

(How) Does it fit with all the others?

You can add links in your profile to Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Skype, your website and include your ORCID ID.

 Our verdict:

A great networking tool but has limitations which researchers should be wary of . The more effort you put into maintaining and regularly updating your profile, the more you will get out of ResearchGate.

An overview of Information Security today and into the future

Kevin Henry is *the* guru in security certifications and training and we are delighted that he will be presenting at the University on the 11th and 12th of June.  Kevin is going to deliver a handful of lectures which will take you on an enlightening journey through the world of Information Security!

Kevin will present on the following topics:

Thursday 11th June

Shelley Lecture Theatre, Poole House

10.00am – 12.30 pm

Content of the CISSP

What is Information Security and its Role in Business?

2pm – 4pm

How is the face of Information Security Changing?

Hackers versus APTs

Where should my career go?

Friday 12th June

Shelley Lecture Theatre, Poole House

10.00am – 12.30pm

The Value of the CISSP and other Certifications

International Standards and Practices – An Overview of ISO/IEC 27001 and PCI-DSS

If you would like to attend any of the lectures please contact the BU Cyber Security Unit to reserve your place – 01202 962 557 or email 

 

Kevin is recognized as one of the Leaders in the field of Information Security worldwide. He has been involved in computers since 1976 when he was an operator on the largest minicomputer system in Canada at the time. He has since worked in many areas of Information Technology including Computer Programming, Systems Analysis and Information Technology Audit. Following 20 years in the telecommunications field, Kevin moved to a Senior Auditor position with the State of Oregon where he was a member of the Governor’s IT Security Subcommittee and performed audits on courts and court-related IT systems. The co-chair of the CBK for the CISSP and several other certifications, as well as an author with published articles in over ten books and magazines, Kevin is the principal of KMHenry Management Inc. and served until recently as the Head of Education for (ISC)2 and Vice President of ITPG, responsible for all educational systems, products and instructors for training programs. Currently Kevin is an Authorized Instructor for (ISC)2, ISACA, and BCI.

 

Visit the BUCSU website for more information on enterprise consultancy, research and education

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