Tagged / data management

RKEDF – Clinical Research Documentation and Filing

On Tuesday 5th November, Research Development & Support are running a 2 hour workshop on clinical research documentation and filing.

This workshop is designed to share best practice in ensuring that records are completed, stored and shared appropriately, in accordance with the ‘ALCOAC’ general principle, and Good Clinical Practice standards.

The workshop will cover the ‘essential documents’ to be kept during the research project, as well as what to do once the study has ended. Also covered will be how to ensure compliance when storing data on paper and electronically and requirements for source data.

By the end of this workshop you will have an understanding about:

  • The ‘ALCOAC’ general principle and how it applies to your research
  • What to keep in your study file
  • How to maintain good and compliant research records, throughout the life-cycle of the study
  • Requirements for once the study has ended

If you’re interested in attending then reserve your place via Organisational Development.

RKEDF – Clinical Research Documentation and Filing

On Tuesday 5th November, RDS are running a 2 hour workshop on clinical research documentation and filing.

This workshop is designed to share best practice in ensuring that records are completed, stored and shared appropriately, in accordance with the ‘ALCOAC’ general principle, and Good Clinical Practice standards.

The workshop will cover the ‘essential documents’ to be kept during the research project, as well as what to do once the study has ended. Also covered will be how to ensure compliance when storing data on paper and electronically and requirements for source data.

By the end of this workshop you will have an understanding about:

  • The ‘ALCOAC’ general principle and how it applies to your research
  • What to keep in your study file
  • How to maintain good and compliant research records, throughout the life-cycle of the study
  • Requirements for once the study has ended

If you’re interested in attending then reserve your place via Organisational Development.

Research Data Management and Sharing – MOOC

data management

Today, an increasing number of funding agencies, journals, and other stakeholders are requiring data producers to share, archive, and plan for the management of their data. In order to respond to these requirements, researchers and information professionals will need the data management and curation knowledge and skills that support the long-term preservation, access, and reuse of data. Effectively managing data can also help optimize research outputs, increase the impact of research, and support open scientific inquiry.

The Curating Research Assets and Data Using Lifecycle Education (CRADLE) Project in collaboration with EDINA at the University of Edinburgh have developed an online course which will provide learners with an introduction to research data management and sharing. After completing this course, learners will understand the diversity of data and their management needs across the research data lifecycle, be able to identify the components of good data management plans, and be familiar with best practices for working with data including the organization, documentation, and storage and security of data. Learners will also understand the impetus and importance of archiving and sharing data as well as how to assess the trustworthiness of repositories. .

After completing this course, learners will also be better equipped to manage data throughout the entire research data lifecycle from project planning to the end of the project when data ideally are shared and made available within a trustworthy repository.

The course material is free to access and if you wish to complete the course with a certificate, there is a charge of £34.

Please click on this link to find out more – https://www.coursera.org/learn/data-management/.

Research Data Management (RDM)

With increased interest from funders and government policy about open access data the recent DCC seminar sponsored by R&KEO about Research Data Management helped explain the data cycle leading to open access.

So what is data? Several definitions exist but in essence anything collected, created, observed and used for your research, e.g. sketches, recordings, social media.

RDM is the process covering the creation and stewardship of materials for use “as long as they retain value”. Well managed and shared data raises research profile and impact, potentially adding to reputation. Clearly we need to maintain careful consideration of sensitive or personal data.

RCUK and many other research funders have an expectation that Data Management Planning (DMP) will be integral to project development and increasingly funders are asking to see your DMP with applications.

The DMP process looks at what data will be created, how it should be managed and includes sharing and presentation considerations. RCUK expect existing data sets to be checked to avoid duplication and Horizon 2020 covers exploitation, access and preservation, see the Research Blog for further information, also DCC offer a multitude of resources including DMP Online which will guide you through creating a DMP step-by-step.

So why share my data? Well the funders’ are asking for this as they see data as a public good and having paid for it they want to maximise their investment (mindful of privacy, security and commerciality interests). Also your data will be safely stored and available when you next require access. Others researchers can scrutinise and enhance the data resource leading to scholarly communication, with suitable citations to you.

Project feedback suggests that collecting data as you progress makes life easier towards the conclusion of the project. Additionally it is worthwhile considering your file naming conventions early on, e.g. name, structure, version. Storage and back up of data is important during the research process and afterwards, you may need the data again and others may have access also. With the latter point to mind some consideration to maintaining data in a repository is sensible, mindful of the economic versus value added conundrum. For example, keeping data available in newer formats to increase data mining in the years ahead. Further advice from DCC can be found here.

Participate in the JISC “Good Data Management Conference” online today

JISC is live streaming its research integrity conference today 13 September looking specifically at the importance of good research data management.  The aim is to bring together the current thinking on effective practice and give senior staff and researchers an opportunity to debate the thornier issues, like whose responsibility this is and how to manage freedom of information requests. 

You are welcome to participate by submitting questions via twitter by using #jiscres11 or emailing jiscevents@gmail.com, your questions will be put to the panel.  You can also watch the keynote speakers live who are:

  • Professor David Baker, deputy chair of JISC
  • Professor Dave De Roure, professor of e-research, Oxford University e-Research Centre and national strategic director of Digital Social Research
  • Professor Sir Tim O’Shea, principal and vice chancellor of University of Edinburgh and chair of JISC
  • Professor Kevin Schürer, pro vice chancellor (Research and Enterprise), University of Leicester
  • Sarah Porter, JISC’s head of innovation

During the conference you can:

  • Learn why research data management matters and who should be responsible for research data management in your organisation
  • Read recommended reports and resources as they are referred to by the speakers
  • Understand from case studies what success might look like
  • Watch key experts describe the routes to successful data management
  • Participate on Twitter and ask questions of the speakers using #jiscres11
  • View technical requirements for watching live stream via Mediasite

There’s no need to register – simply join online today from 09.45.