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FMC Seminar Series: ‘Communicating Research’: 18 November, 3-5pm, Weymouth House

‘Communicating Research’:  FMC Departmental Seminar Series 2015-16

Time: Wednesdays, 3-5 pm

Venue: The Screening Room: W240, Weymouth House, Talbot Campus, Bournemouth University.

 

Wednesday 18 October, 3-4pm

A Politics & Media Research Centre event

Speaker: Orlanda Ward

Signs of progress? The 2010 General Election and Newspaper Coverage of BAME
Women as Parliamentary Candidates’

2010 was a breakthrough year for BAME (Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic) women
in parliament. Although only three had previously been elected to the House of
Commons, a further seven joined their ranks that year. While British gender and
politics research has begun to focus increasingly on news coverage of female
politicians, it has not yet considered the intersection of race and gender in
this context. I employ quantitative and qualitative content analysis to
investigate intersectional racial and gendered differences in the quantity,
quality and content of national newspaper coverage garnered by BAME female
candidates compared to white women and men and BAME men. The results show that
BAME women are more visible than their white female counterparts, but their
coverage is more likely to be negative, and more likely to explicitly foreground
gender. BAME women are also framed alternately as signs of progress, co-opted
tokens, embodied ideologies and substantive representatives.

Orlanda Ward is Teaching Fellow in Qualitative Methods and an ESRC-funded
Political Science PhD candidate at UCL’s School of Public Policy. She has
previously served as a Teaching Fellow in Quantitative Methods.
Her research interests span many aspects of gender and politics, particularly
women’s political representation, intersectionality, and the nexus of gender,
media and politics. Her thesis considers the effects of ethnicity and gender on
the quality and quantity of campaign coverage received by political candidates
in the US and UK.
She has recently served as a Research Assistant to LSE’s Gender and Power
Commission, worked with Dr Heather Savigny on gender and coverage of the 2015
general election, and been appointed as a Visiting Scholar at Rutgers University
and the Center for American Women and Politics. Prior to commencing her PhD, Orlanda completed an MA in Gender Studies (UCL) and worked for a number of
gender-focused NGOs and a frontbench female politician.

 

Wednesday 18 October, 4-5pm, W240

 A BU Journalism Research Group event

 Speaker: Dr Scott Eldridge II, University of Sheffield

‘Iconoclasts and Irritants: WikiLeaks and Journalism’s Troublesome Actors’

From WikiLeaks and Julian Assange to the NSA leaks and Edward Snowden, prominent news stories of late have been notable for the role digital leaks and ‘hacks’ have played in coverage. Centring these stories, key actors working primarily online have also found themselves in the middle of debates of and around journalism as they argue the Fourth Estate is enhanced by their contributions, in some cases asserting their own place alongside journalists and within the journalistic field.

Beyond famous exposés, less prominent but no less provocative ‘hacktivist’ leaks have driven journalistic coverage around secreted-away corporate files, exposures of failures of justice, and celebrity gossip and scandals. This paper argues we can learn from the activities of these actors, including WikiLeaks and others who operate outside journalistic norms and traditional understandings of the journalistic field.

For challenging journalistic norms and confronting boundaries of the journalistic field, this paper sees provocative digital actors as providing opportunities to better understand journalism in a digital age. Situating the journalistic claims and endeavours of these actors within a broader discussion of journalistic identity, ideal-typical, and normative definitions of journalism, it critiques the way traditional definitions of journalism exclude such actors outright, thereby ignoring evaluations of their possibly journalistic acts. Building on previous studies (Eldridge 2013, 2014), this paper argues against privileging narrow views of journalism and offers theoretical insights to take stock of an expanding range of journalistic actors.

 

 About the series

This new seminar series showcases current research across different disciplines and approaches within the Faculty of Media and Communication at BU. The research seminars include invited speakers in the fields of journalism, politics, narrative studies, media, communication and marketing studies.  The aim is to celebrate the diversity of research across departments in the faculty and also generate dialogue and discussion between those areas of research.

Contributions include speakers on behalf of 

The Centre for Politics and Media Research

The Centre for the Study of Journalism, Culture and Community

Narrative Research Group

Journalism Research Group

Advances in Media Management Research Group

Emerging Consumer Cultures Research Group

Public Relations Research Group

 

‘On the Subject of Photographs…’ FMC Lunchtime PGR Research Seminar – Wed, 11 Nov, 1-2pm

Communicating PGR Research:

FMC Lunchtime PGR Seminar Series
All Welcome!

Wednesday 11 November
Weymouth House, Room 431

1-2pm
Speaker: Rutherford

Title: ‘On the Subject of Photographs…’

We are (usually) prepared to acknowledge the influence of the photographer and his/her decisions on the appearance of photographs. Yet the camera – like the microscope and the telescope – is assumed to be both objective and passive when documenting the things in front of the lens. This belief in the objective and passive role of the camera is demonstrated by the prevalence of the phrase that pictures are ‘taken’.

In this talk, I want to consider the possibility that as a result of the ways in which the medium interprets and renders objects, scenes, events and moments as well as the juxtapositions between these, the camera/medium sometimes creates – then records and depicts – scenes, events and ‘moments’ that did not exist until brought into being by the act of photographing them.

 

Rutherford

Previously a commercial photographer in Toronto Canada, Rutherford led a workshop series for graduate students at Toronto’s Ryerson Polytechnic University that explored the significance of the elements intuitively incorporated into our casual photographic snapshots and how these can lead to greater self-awareness and acceptance. Following withdrawal from commercial photographic practice in 1993, Rutherford’s photographic works have been exhibited in solo and group shows in Canada, the United States, France, New Zealand and Japan. Rutherford’s essays on corporate communication, visual design, advertising and their influences on how we make meaning have appeared in several academic journals, newspapers and magazines.

FMC Narrative Research Seminar, Wed, 11th Nov: “She used to get lost in a book”: approaching gendered reading using two archives

Communicating Research
FMC Cross-Departmental Seminar Series 2015-16

Venue: The Screening Room W240, Weymouth House, Talbot Campus,

A BU Narrative Research Group event

Wednesday, 11 November, 4-5pm.

All very welcome as always!

Title: “She used to get lost in a book”: approaching gendered reading using two archives (Memories of Fiction and 100 Families)

Speaker: Dr Shelley Trower and Dr Amy Tooth Murphy (University of Roehampton)

In this talk we will first introduce the Memories of Fiction project, which during 2014-2015 created an oral history archive with members of reading groups who discuss their reading experiences in the context of their life stories. We will then turn to another oral history archive from the 1980s, 100 Families, a very different kind of project which incorporated just a few questions on reading as part of a much broader interest in family life. Using NVivo to analyse the interview transcripts from 100 Families, our collaborative process led us to identify the narration of gendered reading as a key theme, and it is this that our talk will mostly discuss.

Types of reading material (including fiction and newspapers), the ways in which people describe themselves and family members as reading this material, and the value judgements they make, all contribute to a picture of reading within family life as something that often takes place along gendered lines. This gendering of both reading material and the act of reading will be viewed within a historical framework that has consistently constructed reading as highly gendered. Respondents invoke long-standing cultural tropes on the gendered nature of reading, especially involving the historical figure of the female novel-reader, whose reading has tended to be judged as compulsive and escapist, in contrast to the directed, purposeful male reader. 100 Families also helps us to identify a more complex pattern in which family members question the conventional image of the woman reader lost in romance fiction.

About the series
This new seminar series showcases current research across different disciplines and approaches within the Faculty of Media and Communication at BU. The research seminars include invited speakers in the fields of journalism, politics, narrative studies, media, communication and marketing studies. The aim is to celebrate the diversity of research across departments in the faculty and also generate dialogue and discussion between those areas of research.

Contributions include speakers on behalf of
The Centre for Politics and Media
The Centre for the Study of Journalism, Culture and Community
Narrative Research Group
Public Relations Research Group
Advances in Media Management Research Group
Emerging Consumer Cultures Research Group

FMC Research seminar Series: Wednesday 14 October, 3-5pm, Room W240 Weymouth House

Communicating Research
FMC Cross-Departmental Seminar Series 2015-16

When: Wednesdays, 3-5 pm
Where: The Screening Room W240, Weymouth House, Talbot Campus,
Bournemouth University, Fern Barrow, Poole, Dorset, BH12 5BB

Wednesday 14 October, 3-4pm

Dr. Rebecca Watkins (Cardiff University) and Dr. Mike Molesworth (University of Southampton)
Title: Digital Possessions

This session will provide an introduction to digital virtual consumption, exploring the emergence of digital consumption objects and the opportunities and issues they present for consumers and for marketers.

Dr. Mike Molesworth is Principal Teaching Fellow at the University of Southampton. Principal Teaching Fellow. He has been lecturing since 1996, for most of that time focussing on online consumer behaviour and emerging consumer cultures. He was a Teaching Fellow in the Centre of Excellence in Media Practice at the Faculty of Media and Communication at Bournemouth University, where amongst other things, he was involved with innovations in online course delivery. More recently he helped set up the Creative Enterprise Bureau, a unique staff/student collaborative consultancy at Bournemouth University, working for clients such as ITV, Channel 4, Toyota and Samsung. With colleagues he has won several best paper awards in journals and at conferences, including my work on digital consumption with Dr Janice Denegri-Knott in Consumption, Markets and Culture, and with Becca Watkins at the international Consumer Culture Theory Conference. He has also won a ‘most cited’ award in Teaching in Higher Education, for his work on the marketisation of Higher Education

Dr Rebecca Watkins is a Lecturer in Marketing at Cardiff University. She holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Southampton, and a BA (Hons) in Advertising and Marketing Communications from Bournemouth University. Rebecca’s research uses qualitative methods to explore the impact of digital media upon consumer culture, in particular the ways in which notions of owning and possessing are transformed in the context of digital objects. Her work has been published in the Journal of Marketing Management, the Journal of Consumer Culture & Research in Consumer Behaviour, whilst her work in human-computer interaction, in collaboration with the Human Experience and Design research group at Microsoft Research, has been presented at the world’s leading HCI conference.

Wednesday 14 October, 4-5pm

Dr Katy Shaw (Leeds Beckett University)
Title: Financialised Masculinities: Men, Fiction and the Credit Crunch

After the height of the credit crunch, the blame game began, and focus fell firmly on bankers, and male bankers in particular, as being responsible for the crash. Variously dubbed the ‘Man-cession’ or the ‘He-Cession’ by media and political commentators, accusations that an excessively ‘masculine economy’ contributed to the crunch grew in the weeks and months following the economic downturn. Contemporary fiction was quick to respond to the global economic crisis as a source of inspiration for post-millennial narrative. Through this new genre of ‘Crunch Lit’, fiction continued its historical commitment to demystifying the financial world. Examining two case study examples of the new genre – Faulks’ A Week in December (2009) and Lanchester’s Capital (2012) – the paper will interrogate how and why fiction represents the twenty-first century impact of financialisation and its penetration of language, fashion and financial culture to question dominant narratives of the male banker as a new cultural villain for the post-millennial period.

Dr Katy Shaw is Principal Lecturer in Contemporary Literature at Leeds Beckett University. She is also editor of the internationally peer reviewed C21 Literature: journal of 21st-century writings. Her research interests include contemporary writings, working class literatures, regeneration and the languages of comedy. She has published extensively on working class women’s writings, the contemporary novel and twenty-first century literature. Her monograph Crunch Lit examines fictional responses to the global credit crunch.
About the series
This new seminar series showcases current research across different disciplines and approaches within the Faculty of Media and Communication at BU.The research seminars include invited speakers in the fields of journalism, politics, narrative studies, media, communication and marketing studies. The aim is to celebrate the diversity of research across departments in the faculty and also generate dialogue and discussion between those areas of research.

Contributions include speakers on behalf of
The Centre for Politics and Media
The Centre for the Study of Journalism, Culture and Community
Advances in Media Management Research Group
Emerging Consumer Cultures Research Group
Public Relations Research Group
Candida Yates, BA, MA, PhD, FHEA,
Professor of Culture and Communication

Bournemouth University
Faculty of Media and Communication
Weymouth House
Fern Barrow, Poole
Dorset, BH12 5BB

Text Box:

New FMC cross-departmental seminar series: ‘Communicating Research’ 2015-16. Wed. 3-5pm, room PG10

‘Communicating Research’

 FMC Cross-Departmental Seminar Series 2015-16

Venue: Room PG10, Talbot Campus, 

The Faculty of Media and Communication at BU

Time: Wednesdays, 3-5 pm

Bournemouth University, Fern Barrow, Poole, Dorset, BH12 5BB 

Wednesday 7 October 2015

Speakers :
Dr Sukhpreet Singh, University of Glasgow and Dr John Oliver, Bournemouth University

‘Innovating and trading TV formats through brand management practices’

Television formats form a major cultural export and yet, there is no protection under copyright law. Format copycats or imitators freely develop game, reality and talent shows based on successful format ideas. Despite this, the format industry has developed an ingenious and complex suite of market based practices that are allowing a thriving format industry to appear. This chapter discusses how TV format makers use brand management practices, in the absence of any legal solutions, to innovate and trade in their products. These include a number of practices such as: developing and managing the format brand identity, developing localized brand extensions and leveraging the producers brand reputation.

About the Series

This new seminar series showcases current research across different disciplines and approaches within the Faculty of Media and Communication at BU. The research seminars include invited speakers in the fields of journalism, politics, narrative studies, media, communication and marketing studies.  The aim is to celebrate the diversity of research across departments in the faculty and also generate dialogue and discussion between those areas of research

Contributions include speakers on behalf of 

The Centre for Politics and Media

The Centre for the Study of Journalism, Culture and Community

Advances in Media Management Research Group

Emerging Consumer Cultures Research Group

Public Relations Research Group

New Publication by Bournemouth Professor Candida Yates: ‘The Play of Political Culture, Emotion and Identity’

Yates Politics book imag

Dear colleagues,

I am writing to let you know about the publication of my new book, The Play of Political Culture, Emotion and Identity.

Candida Yates, Professor of Culture and Communication, Bournemouth University

cyates@bournemouth.ac.uk

 

The Play of Political Culture, Emotion and Identity offers a new ‘psycho-cultural’ perspective on the psycho-dynamics of UK political culture and draws on psychoanalysis, cultural and media studies and political sociology to explore the cultural and emotional processes that shape our relationship to politics in the late modern, media age. Against a backdrop of promotional, celebrity culture and personality politics, the book uses the notion of ‘play’ as a metaphor to explore the flirtatious dynamics that are often present in the mediatised, interactive sphere of political culture and the discussion is elaborated upon by discussing different aspects of cultural and political identity, including, gender, class and nation. These themes are explored through selected case studies and examples, including the flirtation of Tony Blair, Joanna Lumley’s Gurkha campaign, Margaret Thatcher’s funeral, David Cameron’s identity as a father and the populist appeal of UKIP politician, Nigel Farage.

Table of contents

1. Introducing Emotion, Identity and the Play of Political Culture
2. Spinning the Unconscious and the Play of Flirtation in Political Culture
3. The Dilemmas of Post-Feminism and the Fantasies of Political Culture
4. Political Culture and the Desire for Emotional Wellbeing
5. The Absent Parent in Political Culture
6. Moving Forward to The Past: Fantasies of Nation Within UK Political Culture
7. Reflections on the Psycho-Cultural Dynamics of Political Culture

Further details can be found at Palgrave Macmillan: 

http://www.palgrave.com/page/detail/the-play-of-political-culture–emotion-and-identity-candida-yates/?sf1=barcode&st1=9780230302525

Some reviews

‘Whether she is discussing the political manifestations of a contemporary crisis in masculinity and fatherhood, postmodern feminism, nostalgia, narcissism, play, or therapy culture, Yates’s psychoanalytic lens illuminates, in a nuanced fashion all too rare today, both regressive social trends toward mastery and progressive, creative potentials for change. This book is essential reading for anyone wishing to understand the complex interplay of fantasy, emotion, identity, media, and politics in the era of neoliberalism.’ – Lynne Layton, Harvard Medical School, USA

‘Exploring the entanglement of media, politics and emotions, this is a bold and original book that should be read by students and scholars in Sociology and Media Studies,and anyone with an interest in contemporary political life. It articulates a psycho-cultural perspective, moving with verve and insight from election politics to celebrity culture and from Russell Brand to poverty porn, offering a psychoanalytically informed reading of British political life and its structures of feeling. A satisfying and thought-provoking read.’ – Professor Rosalind Gill, Professor of Social and Cultural Analysis, City University London, UK

‘Through a psychoanalytic critique of the anxieties, fantasies and obsessions that characterise today’s intensely emotional political culture, Candida Yates’ new book makes a powerful case for the argument that Psychosocial Studies is the new Cultural Studies.’ – Sasha Roseneil, Professor of Sociology and Social Theory, Birkbeck, University of London, UK.

Call for Papers: Media Representations of ‘Antisocial Personality Disorder’, 16th September.

Call for papers:

Media Representations of ‘Antisocial Personality Disorder’

Wednesday, 16th September 2015

Bournemouth University

ESRC Seminar Series: Cross Disciplinary Perspectives on ‘antisocial personality disorder

This day-event is being organised as part of the ESRC sponsored seminar series ‘Cross Disciplinary Perspectives on antisocial personality disorder’ (aspd-incontext.org) and is being run in association with the Faculty of Media and Communication at Bournemouth University and the ‘Media and the Inner World’ research network.

We are using ‘Antisocial personality disorder’ as a shorthand for a range of labels used to describe individuals who seem to act in very antisocial ways but who otherwise appear to have a clear understanding of the world. A central thesis of this series is that the kinds of difficulties that are likely to involve the use of labels like ASPD need to be understood within broader historical, cultural and socio-political contexts than many psychological and psychiatric constructs allow.

This event is designed to explore the ways in which the meanings of ASPD have been shaped by the representations of ‘antisocial’ or ‘deviant’ identities in wider culture – in art, literature, film, television and news media. One can find such representations in classic literary depictions of antiheroes like Heathcliff in Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights or Camus’s L’etranger. Lionel Shriver’s 2003 novel and later film adaptation, We Need to Talk about Kevin provides a more contemporary example of a portrayal of an antisocial individual that provoked discussion about the gendered dynamics of the family and maternal ambivalence. Cinematic representations of psychological disturbance can be found in the ‘outsider’ despair and destructiveness of Travis Bickle in Taxi Driver (Scorsese, 1976), or in representations of jealous women in films such as Fatal Attraction (Lyne, 1987) or Gone Girl (Fincher, 2014). On TV, the proliferation of forensic detective dramas such as CSI (CBS, 2000) or legal dramas such as Silk (BBC1, 2001), often trouble the boundaries of ASPD and its meanings as a psychological condition.In news media, representations of mental health are also widespread in efforts to understand the subcultural shaping of individuals such as Dylann Roof, Timothy McVeigh, Mohammad Sidique Khan and others committing acts of ‘terror’.

Whilst such images contribute to the cultural shaping of ASPD, they in turn can have influence on legal and psychiatric debates about the nature of dangerous individuals. As the role of Taxi Driver in the trial of John Hinckley (who attempted to assassinate Ronald Reagan) illustrated, the interaction of media, psychiatry and law can be very direct and can have powerful implications. It is important therefore to explore the ways in which images of ASPD in popular culture also influence the fields of forensic psychotherapy, psychiatry and the law.

We are therefore inviting submissions from people who have an interest in media representations of ‘antisocial personality disorder’ and their significance to psychiatry and socio-legal contexts.

As this is sponsored by the ESRC we be able to pay modest travel and accommodation costs for speakers.

If you are interested in contributing, please send a 300 word abstract to:

· Dr David W Jones, Reader in Psychosocial Studies, University of East London (d.jones@uel.ac.uk)

Closing Date: 7th August (we will let people know soon after)

The organisers

· Dr David W Jones, Reader in Psychosocial Studies, University of East London (d.jones@uel.ac.uk)
· Dr Chris Scanlon, Group Analyst and Principal Lecturer in Psychosocial Studies, University of East London. (c.scanlon@uel.ac.uk)
· Professor David Gadd (University of Manchester)
· Candida Yates, Professor of Culture and Communication, Faculty of Media and Communication, Bournemouth University (cyates@bournemouth.ac.uk).