Posts By / jchoe

CFP RGS-IBG Annual Conference 2017: Migrant Leisure Spaces and Community Wellbeing

RGS-IBG Annual Conference 2017: Decolonising geographical knowledges: opening geography out to the world

London, 29th August -1st September 2017

Session sponsor: Geographies of Leisure and Tourism Research Group (GLTRG)

Call For Papers: Migrant Leisure Spaces and Community Wellbeing

Session Convenor(s):

Jaeyeon Choe (Bournemouth University, UK)

Janet Dickinson (Bournemouth University, UK)

Leisure spaces provide migrants opportunities for developing, expressing and negotiating their personal, social and cultural preferences safely whilst gaining recognition and a sense of belonging. This is especially important as they may confront issues relating to belongingness, societal membership, social status, self-perception and cultural confusion. Leisure can be instrumental to (re)establishing connections and networks with locals as well as other migrants and refugees, and provide spaces for problem solving. Migrants’ ‘going out’ and socialising not only acts as a refuge from the conditions of social isolation and boredom in which they often find themselves, but can also encourage cultural expression. Leisure opportunities and spaces support the development of cultural capital that allows new migrants to feel safe to contemplate building a productive life. Thus, leisure spaces can play an important role in place-making and integration. The role of leisure in integration also reflects the receiving community feeling unthreatened by migration. Thus, it will be fruitful to investigate how leisure spaces (private, public and digital) help develop migrants’ personal and social inclusion and enhance their wellbeing.

We welcome papers related to theoretical and/or empirical aspects of migrant and refugee leisure spaces, community wellbeing, leisure constraints and negotiation strategies, especially problematising (im)mobilities, ethics, morals and (in)justice. Abstracts may focus on (but are not limited to) the following themes:

– Private, public and digital leisure spaces
– Migrant community wellbeing
– Leisure spaces as cultural expression
– Space for social inclusion and/or integration
– Construction of communitas through leisure
– Law/legal geographies and leisure
– Migration, ‘illegality’ and rights
– Tourism mobilities and border crossings
– (Im)mobilities, ethics, morals and (in)justice
– Human security, transnationalization and citizenship
– Leisure and citizenship formation
– Art, aesthetics, border struggles
– Leisure opportunities and migrant communities
– Assimilation and leisure constraints
– Influence of religion on migrant leisure
– Borders, spatial socialization and subjectification
– Social networks, borders and the allure of territory

Mata-Codesal, D., Peperkamp, E., & Tiesler, N. C. (2015). Migration, migrants and leisure: meaningful leisure? Leisure Studies, 34(1), 1 – 4.
Spracklen, K., Long, J., & Hylton, K. (2015). Leisure opportunities and new migrant communities: challenging the contribution of sport. Leisure Studies, 34(1), 114-129.
Stack, J., & Iwasaki, Y. (2009). The role of leisure pursuits in adaptation processes among Afghan refugees who have immigrated to Winnipeg, Canada. Leisure Studies, 28(3), 239-259.

Please submit abstracts to Jaeyeon Choe (jchoe@bournemouth.ac.uk) by 30th January 2017.
Abstracts should be no more than 250 words and include your contact details.

Please see the following link for more details on the conference and registration details.
http://www.rgs.org/WhatsOn/ConferencesAndSeminars/Annual+International+Conference/Annual+international+conference.htm

CFP: Special Issue on Gender and Mobility in Tourism

Call for Papers: Tourism Review
Special Issue on Gender and Mobility in Tourism

Guest Editors:
Jaeyeon Choe, PhD
Centre for Events, Leisure, Society & Culture, Faculty of Management
Bournemouth University, UK

Cristopher Livecchi, PhD
Department of Geography
State University of New York, USA

Gender in/and tourism have been gaining an increasing attention from tourism scholars since the 1990s (e.g., Aitchison, 2005; Figueroa-Domecq et al., 2015; Ferguson, 2011; Ireland, 1993; Pritchard & Morgan, 2000; Munar et al., 2015; Swain, 1995). Despite growing interest and published works, the nexus of tourism and gender has not been thoroughly explored by researchers. Gender and tourism literature is fragmented, with a lack of communication and collaboration across disciplines even though there are overlapping topic areas and discussions. There has not been enough interdisciplinary research work carried out, leading to fragmented literature reviews, theorization processes and methods. Thus, the primary aim of this special issue is to thoroughly review the theories, theorization processes and methods/methodology of gender studies in tourism, by encouraging the incorporation of LGBT, queer studies and ‘White’ feminism concepts and theories.

Secondly, we are interested in exploring how migration and mobility in a globalising world have affected gender issues in relation to tourism, and implications of practices, politics and meanings of mobility for women (Porter, 2011). Migration theory had begun to include feminist theory in the early 1990s (Chant ,1992), and has provided insights into the connections and the mutually constitutive relationship between the construction of masculinities and masculinist ideologies; and migration, (im)mobilities and transnationalism and gender issues. As scholars interested in migration and mobilities work collaboratively and transnationally across different worlds (Yeoh & Ramdas, 2014), papers that address how migration and gender issues influence tourism research and practices are welcome. We also welcome papers that incorporate action research, as well as papers that develop future research directions.

In summary, this special issue, we seek papers related to issues about (im)mobilities, migration, LGBTQ, ‘White’ feminism, action research, social sustainability and the cultural geography of gender and tourism. We invite contributions from a variety of disciplines including anthropology, geography, sociology, psychology, cultural studies, leisure studies, tourism studies and education. We invite you to submit papers on topics that include (but are not limited to):

– Migration and gender (in)equality
– Gender politics, migration and (im)mobilities
– Action research in gender and tourism
– Research methods development
– LGBT/queer studies in tourism field
– ‘White’ feminism/ ‘White’ masculinity
– Cultural geography of gender and tourism
– Social sustainability and gender issues
– Gender and the Sharing Economy
– “Dangerous women” in tourism
– Implications of practices, politics and meanings of mobility for women
– Gender, migration and (im)moralities in developing worlds
– Brexit and its potential impact on immigrant women communities

Each article should be approximately 3000-5500 words long.
Submission Deadlines:

· 500 words abstract due: 20 December 2016
· Full paper due: 20 February 2017

Please send your abstracts/papers to Jaeyeon Choe, PhD (jchoe@bournemouth.ac.uk)

Migration research conference: Borderless Worlds in Finland

Migration Research Conference: Borderless worlds – for whom?

University of Oulu, Finland

I recently attended a migration research conference, “Borderless Worlds- for whom? Ethics, moralities and (in)justice in migration and tourism” organized by the RELATE Centre of Excellence/Academy of Finland & University of Oulu. This was an interdisciplinary conference with leading border and migrant scholars, human geographers, anthropologists and tourism scholars. They also invited journalists, activists, activist researchers and migrants themselves as part of panel sessions. Interestingly, the panel sessions were held at at a local library (Oulu City Library) while being open to local people, which lead to perspectives ‘beyond academia’ (speaking of ‘borderless’!). Through the two day conference, we were exposed to the complexity of the terrain and to pay much-needed attention to the ethics, moralities and (in)justices in border struggles, migration and tourism mobilities. Instead of taking territorial or relational views as normative givens, we came to consider how the simultaneous ‘geographies’ of bounded and open, networked spaces are realised in the contemporary world.

image image

In the State and the Governance of Mobilities session, I presented a paper on tourism development and Filipino migrant workers’ community in Macau (co-authored with Dr. Michael O’ Regan at BU). We discussed how rapid tourism development in Macau attracts high populations of Filipino migrant workers, and how Filipino migrants perceive their quality of life and constraints while working and living in Macau. Most of the migrant workers left family in the Philippines and support them financially, and I showed this was the biggest issue for their happiness and life satisfaction. Another interesting issue was the sense of community. Filipino migrants expressed that it is not only difficult to integrate into the Macau society, but also hard to have their own Filipino community due to multiple complex reasons. We concluded that the government should consider the migrant workers’ subjective quality of life, and introduce new policies to support the migrant workers, and create a livable place for everyone.

Migration research in tourism and leisure has gained more attention, and I am very interested in developing more research projects around ‘migration’ issues starting with the current working paper.

Jaeyeon Choe

Department of Events & Leisure

Faculty of Management

@choe_jaeyeon

Fieldwork on Spiritual Tourism and Meditation, Chiang Mai.

An update from Jaeyeon Choe, Phd (Department of Events & Leisure).

Having explored religious tourism and meditation for over 7 years in the United States, I was excited to collect data on spiritual tourism and outcomes of meditation in Chiang Mai, Thailand in August 2016 so as to incorporate a new geographical context. I was also invited as a visiting researcher at the Centre for Asian Tourism Research at Chiang Mai University, where a working space and library access were kidndly provided for my research activity.

     image (15)     image (2)
While my Ph.D., had focused on the nature and outcomes of meditation in the United States, I always wanted to replicate it in a more ‘authentic’ Buddhist destination to see if/how the meditation practices and benefits differ from the U.S. Four years after my PhD, I finally found myself ‘stalking’ research informants in the Old City, Chiang Mai, where the Buddhist temples are concentrated!
The first week of data collection was tough. Approaching the right people at right time and place to build rapport with them was a challenge. I started going to meditation sessions, which led me to hanging out and chatting with particiapnts. This finally lead to formal interviews. Being a participant was key, even though I did not officially do participant observation. My history of meditation practice was also a good ice-breaker. I ended up meditating every day with my ‘potential’ informants and after a few weeks, I was able to finish my in-depth interviews. I learned a lot about the phenomenon.
image (14)      image (12)
One striking thing, was that informants shared more interesting stories when my digital recorder was off, as informants shared sensitive issues and some life events. Many of the western travellers who engaged in meditation in Chiang Mai wouldn’t call themselves tourists, nor Buddhist! In fact, many of them have even moved to Chiang Mai to meditate ‘full-time’. However, the movement wasn’t fully about “authencity.” An informant who moved to Chiang Mai from San Diego argued that the meditation experiences in Chiang Mai is not more authentic than the American meditation experiences. Explaining, the motivations to move to Chiang Mai is an area I am still exploring.
CqJ5J32UAAA5v6Q     CpuPjMgUMAErIoL
I met several Thai Buddhist monks who helped my research, and who speak fluent English. I asked them, “Monk, why and how do you speak English fleuntly?” They said, becase of the number of western travellers having been bothering them with questions about meditation! A monk told me that approximately 15 years ago, he was tired of being approached by random western travellers asking him about meditation and monastic life, etc. He decided to create a ‘monk chat’ program and free meditation retreats for western tourists/travellers. He now has 5000 meditation visitors every year! There are also several centers in Chiang Mai who offer one month, two months long meditation retreats and attract many westerners. Why? I think I have found some of the answers from my data collection journey.
 image (13)

I like to express my appreciation to Chiang Mai University, Wat Suan Dok temple, local monks and all other informants. Some informants were too kind being interviewed for more than two hours, and some have voluntered for follow-up interviews via Skype. If they are doing all this voluntarily, meidtation must have helped them to develop compassionate minds, right? 🙂

CqEJ6KSUMAAFl8G

CfPs: Emerging Tourism in the Changing World, Chiang Mai Thailand (Nov. 12-13)

Dear BU Researchers:

My colleagues at Center for Asian Tourism Research, Chiang Mai University is organizing an interesting conference, ‘International Conference on Emerging Tourism in the Changing World’ on November 12-13, 2016. Please see the following link for more details:

http://www.emergingtourism.com/

If you have any questions, please contact: DR. PLOYSRI PORANANOND (EMERGINGTOURISM@GMAIL.COM)

Thank you for your interest in advance.

Jaeyeon

Call for Papers: Geographies of Religion and Spirituality

RGS-IBG Annual Conference 2016: Nexus Thinking
London, 30th August – 2nd September 2016

RGS CFPs

CFP: Geographies of Religion and Spirituality: Beyond the ‘officially’ sacred

Session Convenor(s):
Jaeyeon Choe (Bournemouth University, UK)
Michael Di Giovine (West Chester University, US)
Michael Hitchcock (Goldsmiths, University of London, UK)
Michael O’ Regan (Bournemouth University, UK)

Religious spaces facilitate not only historical and traditional rituals and practices, but also social activities such as festivals, games, feasts, travel, sports as well as weddings and funerals (Chick, 1991). In greater and complex societies, religion has become secularized as religious options, personal choice and quests outweigh religious obligation (Graburn, 1983; Possamai, 2000; Turner & Turner, 1978). There has, for example, been increased participation in spiritual activities among tourists at pilgrimage sites (Timothy & Olsen, 2006). Whilst many of people at the sites are motivated by devotion, a large number of sites are shared by tourists and touristic processes. Indeed, many pilgrimage sites have often themselves become secularized (Di Giovine & Picard, 2015). Thus, the distinction between pilgrims and secular tourists has been diminishing, and “not only pilgrims not be easily separated out from secular tourists in this (post-) modern and ‘post-traditional’ age wherein sacrality is often divorced from pure religion” (D’Agostino & Vespasiano, 2000, p. 5). Pilgrims often “share many of the physical infrastructures and service providers as secular travelers…pilgrimage trails and destinations have been given new life through modern, secular tourism” (Di Giovine, 2011, p. 249). As such, pilgrims and tourists exist on a continuum of sacredness and secularity (Smith, 1992), and the distinction between tourism/pilgrimage, tourist/pilgrim, and secular/sacred is rather complex.

While there have been ongoing discussions about categorizing ‘pilgrims’ and/or ‘tourists,’ it is still challenging despite frequent attempts (Afferni, Ferrario & Mangano, 2011; Collins-Kreiner & Gatrell, 2006; Di Giovine, 2011; Poira, Butler & Airey, 2003; Sharpley, 2009). This panel session aims to recognize how religious spaces are central to the lives of pilgrims, and how these religious spaces have meanings to tourists. This panel also seeks to explore discourses on how the two groups experience, interpret, co-exist and perform religious space. Beyond the ‘officially sacred,’ this panel will explore the meanings of religious space to pilgrims and tourists so as to provide a blueprint for how work in the geography of religion and the field of religious tourism may move forward (Brace et al, 2006). We are inviting contributors with papers in the following areas (but not limited to):

– Pilgrim culture
– Pilgrimage and ritual
– Intersection of pilgrimage and heritage
– Pilgrimage and nationalism
– Popular vs. authorized pilgrimage movements
– Religious (space) tourism management
– Pilgrimage trails and destinations
– Trends/Motivations of spiritual tourists
– Conflicts between pilgrims and tourists at pilgrimage sites
– Religious/spiritual tourism and sustainability
– Religious tourism and regional development
– Future directions

Di Giovine, M., & Picard, D. (2015). The Seductions of Pilgrimage: Sacred Journeys Afar and Astray in the Western Religious Tradition, Surrey, UK: Ashgate.

Please submit abstracts to Jaeyeon Choe (jchoe@bournemouth.ac.uk) by 15th February 2016. Abstracts should be no more than 250 words and include your contact details.

Please see the following link for more details on the CFP, conference and registration details:

http://www.rgs.org/WhatsOn/ConferencesAndSeminars/Annual+International+Conference/Annual+international+conference.htm

CFPs RGS-IBG 2016: Geographies of Religion and Spirituality

research7RGS-IBG Annual Conference 2016: Nexus Thinking
London, 30th August – 2nd September 2016

CFP: Geographies of Religion and Spirituality: Beyond the ‘officially’ sacred

Session Convenor(s):
Jaeyeon Choe (Bournemouth University, UK)
Michael Di Giovine (West Chester University, US)
Michael Hitchcock (Goldsmiths, University of London, UK)
Michael O’ Regan (Bournemouth University, UK)

Religious spaces facilitate not only historical and traditional rituals and practices, but also social activities such as festivals, games, feasts, travel, sports as well as weddings and funerals (Chick, 1991). In greater and complex societies, religion has become secularized as religious options, personal choice and quests outweigh religious obligation (Graburn, 1983; Possamai, 2000; Turner & Turner, 1978). There has, for example, been increased participation in spiritual activities among tourists at pilgrimage sites (Timothy & Olsen, 2006). Whilst many of people at the sites are motivated by devotion, a large number of sites are shared by tourists and touristic processes. Indeed, many pilgrimage sites have often themselves become secularized (Di Giovine & Picard, 2015). Thus, the distinction between pilgrims and secular tourists has been diminishing, and “not only pilgrims not be easily separated out from secular tourists in this (post-) modern and ‘post-traditional’ age wherein sacrality is often divorced from pure religion” (D’Agostino & Vespasiano, 2000, p. 5). Pilgrims often “share many of the physical infrastructures and service providers as secular travelers…pilgrimage trails and destinations have been given new life through modern, secular tourism” (Di Giovine, 2011, p. 249). As such, pilgrims and tourists exist on a continuum of sacredness and secularity (Smith, 1992), and the distinction between tourism/pilgrimage, tourist/pilgrim, and secular/sacred is rather complex.

While there have been ongoing discussions about categorizing ‘pilgrims’ and/or ‘tourists,’ it is still challenging despite frequent attempts (Afferni, Ferrario & Mangano, 2011; Collins-Kreiner & Gatrell, 2006; Di Giovine, 2011; Poira, Butler & Airey, 2003; Sharpley, 2009). This panel session aims to recognize how religious spaces are central to the lives of pilgrims, and how these religious spaces have meanings to tourists. This panel also seeks to explore discourses on how the two groups experience, interpret, co-exist and perform religious space. Beyond the ‘officially sacred,’ this panel will explore the meanings of religious space to pilgrims and tourists so as to provide a blueprint for how work in the geography of religion and the field of religious tourism may move forward (Brace et al, 2006). We are inviting contributors with papers in the following areas (but not limited to):

– Pilgrim culture
– Pilgrimage and ritual
– Intersection of pilgrimage and heritage
– Pilgrimage and nationalism
– Popular vs. authorized pilgrimage movements
– Religious (space) tourism management
– Pilgrimage trails and destinations
– Trends/Motivations of spiritual tourists
– Conflicts between pilgrims and tourists at pilgrimage sites
– Religious/spiritual tourism and sustainability
– Religious tourism and regional development
– Future directions

Di Giovine, M., & Picard, D. (2015). The Seductions of Pilgrimage: Sacred Journeys Afar and Astray in the Western Religious Tradition, Surrey, UK: Ashgate.

Please submit abstracts to Jaeyeon Choe (jchoe@bournemouth.ac.uk) by 15th February 2016. Abstracts should be no more than 250 words and include your contact details.

Please see the following link for more details on the conference and registration details.
http://www.rgs.org/WhatsOn/ConferencesAndSeminars/Annual+International+Conference/Annual+international+conference.htm

Global BU- Partnership with Korean universities!

Dr. Jaeyeon Choe recently visited South Korea, and a number of higher education institutions, including Sookmyng Women’s University in Seoul to explore exchange programs for students and staff. The international relations office director and coordinator at Sookmyng, in particular, were extremely positive and supportive of building a partnership with BU! Sookmyng offers various exchange programs including short-term summer courses for international students and invite lecturers from partnership universities every summer. This could, in the future, be a great opportunity for BU lecturers who are interested in international teaching during summer semesters. Sookmyung is also keen on research collaboration as well as students exchange for studying and staff exchange for teaching. According to the international relations office director, Korean students in Seoul are very interested in studying in the UK for at least one semester; they are eager to experience the UK university culture if there is an opportunity. Both parties are currently working on the agreements and contractual issues.

Dr. Jaeyeon Choe is currently involved in a research project with Dr. Yonggu Suh. Dr. Suh is a professor of Marketing at Sookymung and director of the Korean Retail Management Association. The project is a cross-cultural study on Chinese and Korean consumer behavior. Dr. Choe and Dr. Suh have finished collecting data in Seoul, and will start collecting comparison data in Beijing, China in the spring semester.

Dr. Choe, along with the International Office believes there are opportunities to grow links between BU and Sookmyung, where Jaeyeon grew up and studied. She has also communicated with Jeju National University located in beautiful Jeju Island, which offer international tourism degree programs and other more major programs. Stay tuned for updates!Sookmyung