Posts By / Kip Jones

Catch award-winning RUFUS STONE this Thursday 2 pm in Kimmeridge

As part of BU’s Interdisciplinary Reserch Week, Kip Jones will be showing the short award-winning biopic RUFUS STONE in Marconi Theatre in Kimmeridge at 2:00 pm on Thursday, 14 May.

If you haven’t seen it before, please do come along! Or come see it for a second time! We will be showing it on a very large screen in blu-ray with a fab sound system, the best way to view this poetic rendering of a researched story. Lots of time for questions following the screening too. Media’s Trevor Hearing will moderate.

And there’s cake and coffee!

Get your tickets here

Watch the Trailer here

“Academic engages with filmmaker for impact & wider audience”

 

Bournemouth University offers two opportunities to learn how in-depth research was turned into the award-winning biopic, RUFUS STONE.  Premiered in 2012 at Bournemouth, the film has gone on to be screened by universities and by service providers across the UK and abroad.  Since the first of the year, the film has also been available for free on the Internet and has been viewed over 9,000 times around the globe.

On Thursday, 14 May RUFUS STONE will be screened on the Talbot Campus of the University in the Marconi Theatre in the Kimmeridge Building, 14:00-15:30 (Please note there will refreshments available from 13:30). This is an opportunity to see the film on a large screen with a sophisticated sound system—the best way to view the poetic rendering of this breath-taking story. Following the half-hour screening, Project Lead, Author and the film’s Executive Producer, Dr. Kip Jones, will take part in a Q & A with the audience. Dr. Trevor Hearing from the Media Faculty will moderate the discussion.

Please register for free at: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/from-ivory-tower-to-silver-screen-academics-engaging-with-filmmakers-for-impact-and-to-reach-a-tickets-16206925350  The screening is part of a series of events during the week at Bournemouth University celebrating interdisciplinary research.  More info: https://research.bournemouth.ac.uk/interdisciplinary-research-week-2015/

Rufus Stone is the key output of the three-year research project, “Gay and Pleasant Land? -a study about positioning, ageing and gay life in rural South West England and Wales “. The Project was a work package in the New Dynamics of Ageing Project, “Grey and Pleasant Land?: An Interdisciplinary Exploration of the Connectivity of Older People in Rural Civic Society” and funded by Research Councils UK.

Award-winning author and educator, Patricia Leavy, describes the plot in her review of the film for The Qualitative Report: The film tells the story of a young man in rural England who, while developing an attraction to another young man, is viciously outed by small-minded village people. He flees to London and returns home 50 years later and is forced confront the people from his past and larger issues of identity and time. 

“Seven years of you life? Was it worth it?” A second opportunity, the following week on Monday, 18 May at 2:35 p.m. in the Executive Business Centre 206, Holdenhurst Road BH8 8EB, will provide a chance to hear just how Jones went about developing the project bid and obtaining funding from the Research Councils. Jones will tell the tale of the three years of development that went into securing the funding for the research and finally, the production of the film.

The Gay and Pleasant Land? Project was a research project that took place as part of the New Dynamics of Ageing Programme (a unique collaboration between five UK Research Councils—ESRC, EPSRC, BBSRC, MRC and AHRC) on ageing in 21st Century Britain. If that wasn’t complicated enough, our project at  Bournemouth University was one of seven projects in The Grey and Pleasant Land? group being funded by the NDA in south west England and Wales. Hear how Jones navigated this knotty progression, always keeping his eyes on the prize of making a professional film based on in-depth research.

Open to the public and free. More information at: http://blogs.bournemouth.ac.uk/research/2015/04/27/hss-sharing-research-experiences-day-18-may-2015/

 


 

“A Breath of Fresh AiR”

The Bournemouth University ARTS in Research Collaborative (AiR) held a two-day workshop in late summer to experiment with interviewing, narrative and ephemera, and arts-based representations of such approaches (reported here previously). An article available online from today in The Qualitative Report by Kip Jones entitled, “A Report on an Arts-led, Emotive Experiment in Interviewing and Storytelling” details the thinking behind this effort and the mechanisms put in place that contributed to the workshop’s success.

The paper reports on the two-day experimental workshop in arts‐led interviewing technique using ephemera to elicit life stories and then reporting narrative accounts back using creative means of presentation.

 Academics and students from across Departments at Bournemouth University told each other stories from their pasts based in objects that they presented to each other as gifts. Each partner then reported the shared story to the group using arts‐led presentation methods.

Narrative research and the qualitative interview are discussed. The conclusion is drawn that academics yearn to express the more emotive connections generated by listening to the stories of strangers.

The procedures followed for the two‐day workshop are outlined in order that other academics may also organize their own experiments in eliciting story using personal objects and retelling stories creatively.

Because the group wanted to take the impact of this experience further, AiR applied and was accepted to present the concept at the Social Research Association’s workshop ‘Creative Research Methods’ on 8 May at the British Library in London. The Collaborative is about to meet up to brainstorm ways in which to translate their experiences of the workshop into a more presentational one.

Anyone from across Departments, whether lecturer, researcher, student or faculty, is welcome to join the ARTS in Research Collaborative. Please contact Kip Jones if you are interested in joining or just want to know more about the Collaborative.

 This just in from Creative Quarter!

Ten ‘rules’ for being creative in producing research

Sage Publishes Kip Jones’ Ten ‘Rules’ for Being Creative in Producing Research

Sage Publications online presence, “Social Science Space” has published BU Kip Jones’ “Ten ‘Rules’ for Being Creative in Producing Research’ on its website.

Since the changing of the year seems to be the time for lists, top ten lists, etc., Jones decided to compile his about being creative whist producing cutting‐edge research. Jones warned, “Not for the faint‐hearted!” The list is available here.

Students and Academics with further interest in arts-based research and dissemination are welcome to join the Arts in Research (AiR) Collaborative. More information here.

 

 

Sage Publications’ Social Science Space features article by Kip Jones

 

Sage Publications disseminates important research across the social science disciplines around the world. For the second time, Sage’s on line presence, Social Science Space, features an article by Bournemouth University’s Kip Jones.

“(The Grand Theory of) Neo Emotivism” is Jones’ take on the current state of mind of many researchers globally wishing to connect to their research “subjects” as well as to their own emotions. The article first appeared on Jones’ blog, KIPWORLD, where it has been viewed nearly 900 times in less than a month. The article went live today as the lead article on Social Science Space.

“’Neo-emotivism’ is a concept Kip Jones describes as intentionally using emotional responses for academic ends in large part by drawing from non-traditional sources like art and literature for inspiration and even vocabulary”. Fashioned in a tongue-in-cheek way after 19th and 20th Century art manifestos, the article makes it’s case by highlighting examples from a range of resources, including singer Jeff Buckley, composer Max Richter, artist Kazimir Malevich and architect Zada Hadid.

Thoughts for the article initially emerged from Jones’ interactions with fellow BU academics at a recent ARTS in Research (AiR) two-day workshop at Bournemouth University. Jones was surprised and encouraged by faculty and students, not only from Health & Social Care, but also from Media, Design, Engineering and Computing and Tourism with a similar ache to connect emotionally with their subjects and to acknowledge the “first person” in their dialogues. His concept of the “Pre-REFaelites” materialised from that encounter.

The ARTS in Research (AiR) cross-Schools collaborative will hold an additional two days of workshops at the Lighthouse in Poole led by artist-in-residence, Hazel Evans, on 20th and 21st November. Faculty and students from across schools and from outside of the University are encouraged to join us for the two days of creative engagement. More info

Two-day ARTS in Research Workshop at the Lighthouse Centre for the Arts in Poole

Bournemouth University Centre for Qualitative Research and

ARTS in Research Collaborative

in co-operation with
The Lighthouse Poole’s Centre for the Arts
Centre of artistic excellence for live events, theatre, music, film & visual arts present:
Two-day Workshop 20 & 21 November, 2014
Developing Arts-based Approaches
to Academic Research  
With Hazel Evans, Artist-in-Residence at The Lighthouse
Established artist in Dorset, Hazel is a multi-disciplinary artist working with the themes of communication, journeys, interior and exterior landscapes of the body. Her storytelling theatre company ‘Valise Noire’, was established in 2011. “Words, musical scores and ink on paper fusing the past and present, inspire my illustrative and written work. I enjoy blending antiquity with contemporary, reality and fantasy, black and white. I respond to music in real time documenting the feelings and sounds by the visual landscaping of my illustrations, poems and live art. ” –Hazel Evans
Spend two days exploring the workspaces of living, breathing performers and artists with us at the Lighthouse!  You will have a tour of the facilities, then see and discuss Hazel’s installation in the gallery. With Hazel’s guidance, you will work on your own projects, beginning in text as a point-of-departure. You will explore working with your body, music and/or multi-media during the two days of activities.
Cost for the two-day workshop: £200.
Early-bird discount (by 31st October): £175.
Teas, coffees on arrival and mid-morning break plus choice of finger buffet lunch will be included in the price. The days will run from 9:30 am until 4 pm.
Academic staff and students are encouraged to apply for funding through their School’s training and/or enrichment schemes.

ARTS in Research (AiR) Collaborative: Two days of creative scholarship

Shared objects/stories of a past (click on photo to enlarge)

“I can’t remember ever attending such an inspiring ‘in house’ event “.

The newly formed ARTS in Research Collaborative recently held two days of exploration of biography and ways and means of expressing the stories of others creatively and ethically. The workshop was entitled, A Past/A Present” ARTS in Research (AiR) Workshop.

Using shared objects representing a time or event in each participant’s life, a ‘partner’ then created a five minute presentation of and from the storied materials. Participants in the two-days of exploration came from HSC, the Media School and DEC. Both faculty and postgrad students took part.

The brief was kept simple and instruction to a minimum. Organiser Kip Jones shared examples from his own work of finding ways and means of responding creatively to detailed data as well as time and material constraints. Other than that, participants engaged in a learning process through participation itself and the sharing of their experiences. The group has agreed to write up the encounter for a journal article.

 

  • “Thank you all for the incredible willingness to be inventive, creative and think/be  outside ‘the box'”.

  • “An illuminating two days of deep sharing. I was honoured to be there and look forward to more creative adventures together”.

  • “Inspiring. An artful and generative suspension of ‘normal’ activity”.

The ARTS in Research Collaborative’s next workshop is planned for November at The Lighthouse in Poole. Details to follow. It will be open to a wider audience and there will be a charge to attend, but BU faculty and students are encouraged to apply for training and/or development funding within their Schools.

ARTS in Research (AiR) still accepting new members!

AiR Workshop: telling stories (click on photo to enlarge)

 

 

“Handsome young men and shoes I’ll never wear”

Lots of ‘creativity’ in academia to report, at least according to two articles in recent international blogs.

The Creativity Post reports a playful interchange between Kip Jones (RUFUS STONE) and Patricia Leavy (Method Meets Art). Each scholar asked the other 20 Questions. The only requirement was NOT to talk about their work. In an article written by Jones and Leavy elsewhere (The Qualitative Report), Jones advises ‘not to live and work in silos, but let all parts of your lives flow in and out of each other’. In this spirit, Leavy and Jones discuss the personal in the Creative Post article and how it contributes to their innovative endeavors.

In another article in the Creative Quarter, Jones is interviewed by Bournemouth University  Media School’s Trevor Hearing about the making of the research-based, award-winning short biopic, RUFUS STONE. Jones admits that here too the personal became central to solidifying the characters for the film and how auto-ethnography played a role in creating the story.

Those with an interest in ARTS in Research (AiR) are welcome to join the collaboration now forming across Schools at BU. Both faculty and postgrad students welcome!  More information or contact Kip Jones.

Centre for Qualitative Research (CQR) Refreshes Its Web Presence

The Centre for Qualitative Research (CQR), a long-standing resource for research practice and postgraduate learning at BU, has recently undergone a ‘refit’ of its web pages.  Content from the old site has been moved over to the new platform for Bournemouth University groups and centres. The new format now makes it possible to link with work taking place in other Schools and research sites. In addition, Impact, Public Engagement and Postgraduate Research links feature on every page.

CQR is held in high esteem globally for its innovative work and commitment to qualitative research. The refreshed web pages provide an international ‘shop window’ for CQR, School of Health & Social Care and BU more generally in regards to cutting-edge qualitative work. CQR has always engaged across Schools at BU and welcomes new opportunities for collaborate efforts.

The new CQR pages include information, resources and links organised around the following areas of research:

In addition, areas such as Biographic Narrative Interpretive Research, Cut-up Technique and Appreciative Inquiry are covered. A new page outlining the ‘Gay and Pleasant Land? Project and Rufus Stone’ has been added. The recently organised, cross-Schools ARTS in RESEARCH (AiR) collaboration is also featured.

The new web pages include new information and resources, links to further information and even videos for viewing pleasure! Last but not least, a photo has been added as a ‘Featured Image’ highlighting the essence of each page.

Have a look around this interesting site!

Turning Research into Film published in Qualitative Research text

 Just published! A chapter entitled, ‘Turning Research into Film’, by Kip Jones and Trevor Hearing has just been published in Sage’s Qualitative Research for the Social Sciences edited by Marilyn Lichtman. The full title of the Chapter: Turning Research into Film: Trevor Hearing speaks with Kip Jones about the process of creating the short research-based film, Rufus Stone.

Lichtman’s books on qualitative research are well-known and adopted for courses internationally.

The Chapter is an an expansion on an earlier interview conducted by the Media School’s Trevor Hearing. HSC’s Kip Jones illuminates several of his responses with excerpts from the story development for the award-winning, research based short film, RUFUS STONE. Hearing and Jones also collaborated on creating the trailer for RUFUS STONE. 

The film was recently purchased by the Alzheimer’s Society for use in its trainings nationally.  In addition, it will be screened locally for Dorset Healthcare Trust nurses and staff. The film has been keynoted at events at Cambridge, LSE, Birkbeck and Durham Universities over the past year and featured in both the ESRC Festival of Social Science and BU Festival of Learning.

The unique collaboration forged in making the film has been reported in the New York Times and Times Higher Education as well as in academic journals and other book chapters and featured as ‘inspirational’ in the BU’s Annual Report. The film has been screened in academic settings, for social and health service providers and general audiences in several cinemas. Rufus Stone won two awards for short film at the prestigious Rhode Island International Film Festival.

The film will be screened on the Lansdowne campus in December for staff and students.

Monday, 9 December, 1 pm

Wollstonecraft Theatre (BG10)

Bournemouth House

All are welcome!

Just a few reactions to Rufus Stone from audience members attending screenings:

“Critically the authenticity of the film shone through – the characters were real and genuine”.

    •   “emotionally gripping”
    •   “technically innovative and striking”
    •   “a brilliant way to portray research”
    •   “beautiful and very intense”
    •   “a quite remarkable film”
    •   “a brilliant film, beautifully crafted and full of empathy”

Cinematographer Annika Summerson and crew set up shot with Harry Kershaw (centre) who plays young RUFUS STONE

Dutch student builds on Rufus Stone with project on LGBT teens

A student from the Netherlands, Coco Sips, has spent time recently in Bournemouth and Dorset learning about LGBT teens and particularly those isolated in rural settings. Her study had resonance with the film, Rufus Stone, and so Coco sought the advice Executive Producer and Lead of the Gay and Pleasant Land? Project, Dr Kip Jones, when planning her study. Jones commented: ‘Although the main characters in Rufus Stone are in their seventies at the end of our film, the consequences of their youth are very much the driving forces of their lifetimes and the film. We hope to continue to explore LGBT youth through community connections and issues of social inclusion in a follow-up study now under consideration’.

Sips also sought advice from Intercom Trust, a organisation for LGBT people in the south west penisula, that was central to the earlier Gay and Pleasant Land? Project on isolated older lesbians and gay men in rural south west England. Coco then worked closely with a local LGBT Space Youth Project‘s organisers and teens to produce her report and a short video, Into SPACE.

A participant in the video, "Into SPACE"

In the film, young LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender) youth tell their story about feelings of acceptance and/or social exclusion living in the rural area of Dorset, Southwest of England. The film was produced by Coco Sips as a part of her thesis project, “Social Exclusion amongst young LGBT people living in Rural Dorset” and performed on behalf of Space Youth Project, a non-governmental organization in Dorset.

The film Into SPACE  can be viewed here.

 

Rufus Stone to screen Monday 18th March at Kimmeridge

“Love, sexual tension, betrayal, abandonment, anger, sadness all simmering under the façade of British politeness”. –previous audience member.

The award-winning short film, Rufus Stone, will be featured by the Media School’s Narrative Group with a screening on Monday, 18th March at 1 pm in Kimmeridge (KG 03).  All are invited to attend.

Rufus Stone is the culmination of three years of Research Councils UK funded New Dynamics of Ageing research at Bournemouth.  The project, ‘Gay and Pleasant Land? was led by HSC and the Media School’s Kip Jones with a team of researchers and an Advisory Committee made up of older LGBT citizens and their service providers.

The film stars well-known actor, William Gaunt (“The Champions“) in the title role, with Harry Kershaw (“One Man, Two Guvnors“) playing young Rufus.  Rufus Stone was directed by Josh Appignanesi (“The Infidel“) with a story by Kip Jones.

Appignanesi describes the plot:

  • “Rufus Stone dramatises the old and continued prejudices of village life from three main perspectives. Chiefly it is the story of Rufus, an ‘out’ older gay man who was exiled from the village as a youth and reluctantly returns from London to sell his dead parents’ cottage, where he is forced to confront the faces of his estranged past.  Of these, Abigail is the tattletale who ‘outed’ Rufus 50 years ago when he spurned her interest.  She has become a lonely deluded lush.  Flip, the boy Rufus adored, has also stayed in the village: a life wasted in celibacy (occasionally interrupted by anonymous sexual encounters) and denial (who is) looking after his elderly mother.  But Rufus too isn’t whole, saddled with an inability to return or forgive”.

This screening (30 minutes) will be followed by a discussion by Jones on the use of biography, narrative and auto-ethnography in building the story for the film.

Trailer for the film. All are welcome!

Kip Jones interviewed by LSE’s Impact blog

London School of Economics’ “Impact of Social Sciences” weblog has just published a five-minute interview with HSC and the Media School’s Kip Jones.  Mark Carrigan, Managing Editor of the British Politics and Policy blog talked with Jones for a piece entitled, “5 Minutes with Kip Jones: “we engage in the creative process and open new doors for communication” on the site.

Carrigan was particularly interested in questioning Jones about the impact that the research-based, award-winning short film, Rufus Stone, has produced. Jones answered questions about how the script was crafted from years of in-depth research. He also discussed the possibility of social scientists collaborating with artists, but also generating their own small projects, which Jones likes to call ‘kitchen sink’ work.

The growing Performative Social Science movement is commented upon. Advice on funding such ventures and the possibilities of arts-based research and dissemination in  engaging ‘in the creative process and open(ing) new doors for communication and future development possibilities’ is highlighted.

Rufus Stone will be screened at Cambridge Arts Picturehouse cinema on the 22nd of February at 4 p.m.as part of their Arts and Science Researcher Forum. The film also can be seen at BU at Talbot campus hosted by BU Media School’s Narrative Group on 18 March, Kimmeridge (KG03) at 1 p.m.