Posts By / ballen

Photo of the week: ‘Halo’

Telling a story of research through photography

The ‘photo of the week’ is a weekly series featuring photographs taken by BU academics and students for our Research Photography Competition which took place earlier this year.

These provide a snapshot into some of the incredible research taking place across the BU community. 

This week’s photo of the week is the last in the series, taken by Mikhail Kapychka; The Royal Society 2019 Astronomy category winner

‘Halo’ 

‘This image of the lunar halo inspired me to explore this natural phenomenon. I accidentally saw a halo around the moon and took this photo in the night winter forest. A halo is an optical phenomenon, a glowing ring around a light source. There are many types of halos and they are caused mainly by ice crystals in Cirrus clouds at an altitude of 5-10 km in the upper troposphere. The type of halo depends on the shape and location of the crystals. Light reflected and refracted by ice crystals often decomposes into a spectrum, making the halo look like a rainbow. The most vivid and full-colour are pargelia and anti-aircraft arc, less bright-tangent small and large halo.’

‘Now I am engaged in research and a variety of this natural phenomenon, I have a large collection of photos of different types of halo around the world, and thanks to this, people learn about this fascinating phenomenon.’

If you have any questions about the Photo of the Week series or the Research Photography Competition please email research@bournemouth.ac.uk

Photo of the week: ‘Through different eyes’

Telling a story of research through photography

The ‘photo of the week’ is a weekly series featuring photographs taken by BU academics and students for our Research Photography Competition which took place earlier this year.

These provide a snapshot into some of the incredible research taking place across the BU community. 

This week’s photo of the week was taken by Chantel Cox and is titled;

‘Through different eyes’

‘My research is looking at how our identities are affected as we get older and how older people with frailty manage these changes. This image is of a great grandfather and great grandson looking out to sea in Poole. This is where my research is being carried out but it made me think how although they are both looking at the same scene they are looking at it through totally different eyes. This is the same as we get older and look at all aspects of the world’

If you have any questions about the Photo of the Week series or the Research Photography Competition please email research@bournemouth.ac.uk

Photo of the week: ‘Active ageing in place’

Telling a story of research through photography

The ‘photo of the week’ is a weekly series featuring photographs taken by BU academics and students for our Research Photography Competition which took place earlier this year.

These provide a snapshot into some of the incredible research taking place across the BU community. 

This week’s photo of the week was taken by Dr Michelle Heward and is titled;

‘Active ageing in place’

The onset of physical and mental impairments in later life may mean that mobility declines and individuals need to adjust or change their levels of activity accordingly. Older people therefore require choice of physical activities that are flexible to ensure all abilities are catered for. The GO Active Gold Programme in Oxfordshire encourages people in rural areas age 60 and over, to live more active lifestyles, by setting up local physical activities for all abilities. With funding received from Sport England, they employed rural Activators, to work in partnership with local communities to deliver a varied, inclusive and social physical activity programme. To date, the programme has engaged over 3000 participants from 81 different villages.

Under the ‘Activity and Inclusion’ research theme the Ageing and Dementia Research Centre are currently evaluating how far the project has improved the physical and mental well-being of older adults; encouraged stronger community spirit by reducing loneliness and social isolation through participation in activities; developed a sustainable physical activity programme. Research team: Dr Michelle Heward (Post-Doctoral Research Fellow), Amanda Adams (PhD Student) Prof Jane Murphy (Professor of Nutrition)

If you have any questions about the Photo of the Week series or the Research Photography Competition please email research@bournemouth.ac.uk

Photo of the week: ‘Rich and poor living side by side in 21st century India’

Telling a story of research through photography

The ‘photo of the week’ is a weekly series featuring photographs taken by BU academics and students for our Research Photography Competition which took place earlier this year.

These provide a snapshot into some of the incredible research taking place across the BU community. 

This week’s photo of the week was taken by Professor of Maternal and Perinatal Health Research; Edwin van Teijlingen and is titled:

‘Rich and poor living side by side in 21st century India’

‘This photo of a shack made of corrugated iron surrounded by newly build white painted concrete apartment buildings represents the old and the new India. It also reflects the enormous gap between the poor and those growing urban middle-class. The shack is located on a bit of wasteland, suggesting a something temporary, perhaps this piece of land is a future building site. At the same time this humble abode has washing hanging outside signifying certain standards of hygiene as well as dignity in poverty.’

‘This photo was taken in Pune (India) which I visited as part of BU’s Global Festival of Learning in February 2018. This mixture of ‘old and new’ as well as ‘rich and poor’ can be found all over cities in India and Nepal. The picture represents our research in the sense that we continuously try to improve the lives of the poorest in South-Asian society.’

If you have any questions about the Photo of the Week series or the Research Photography Competition please email research@bournemouth.ac.uk

Photo of the week: ‘A sense of place’

Telling a story of research through photography

The ‘photo of the week’ is a weekly series featuring photographs taken by BU academics and students for our Research Photography Competition which took place earlier this year.

These provide a snapshot into some of the incredible research taking place across the BU community. 

This week’s photo of the week was taken by  Dr Sue Baron and is titled;

‘A sense of place’

This image ‘A Sense of Place’ illustrates one of the many often unreported benefits of co-creation projects, where research outputs are achieved by BU staff, students and members of the public working together. An important part of being human is for us to feel a sense of place; not just in terms of our environment and objects but also through our experiences and the connections we make as these contribute to our sense of belonging, togetherness, comfort and security. Being aware of the importance of these factors is vital in research that seeks to investigate or report on human experience as was the aim of this project. This image captures the positive sense of place and togetherness which developed between two former strangers, Emma and Helen (L-R) through their engagement with this project. Helen has cerebral palsy and complex communication needs and has experienced many and varied challenges as a patient in hospital which she wanted to share.

Outputs from the project include a series of filmed interactions between a patient and nurse. An example can be viewed on Virtual Empathy Museum click on ‘Take a Walk in my Shoes’, Simulation Room and ‘Empathic care of a person with cerebral palsy e-simulation’. The photograph was taken on location in Helen’s home.

If you have any questions about the Photo of the Week series or the Research Photography Competition please email research@bournemouth.ac.uk

WeObserve launches its first online course: Citizen Science Projects – How to make a difference

WeObserve, in partnership with FutureLearn, introduces its first online course, Citizen Science Projects: How to make a difference. The course starts on 18 November 2019 and will run for four-weeks. It is open to anyone and is free to participate. The course is now open for registration on the FutureLearn platform here.

During the course, learners will be able to discover citizen science projects and find out how to create and lead their own citizen observatory. Citizen science experts will share their knowledge, experiences and best practices in delivering citizen science projects. The course will also support co-creation and shared learning through discussion forums and group activities.

Exploring a diverse range of citizen science topics including:

  • Understanding the issue or problem: exploring environmental issues, deciding on a researh focus and defining the research question(s).
  • Creating a community: finding the people who are brought together by a shared concern and positively nurturing the sharing of ideas and experiences.
  • Deciding what data to collect: using the research question(s) to select what information will be gathered.
  • Capturing or generating the data: collecting the information, keeping motivated and engaged.
  • Analysing the data: interpreting the data, being able to spot trends and anomalies.
  • Disseminating results: using the findings from the data to communicate with others about the environmental concern.
  • Change-making and planning action: using the findings to lobby for change, or plan an intervention or action to inform others about the environmental concern.

Through this course, the aim is to build an international community of learners that will explore what is citizen science, what are citizen observatories, which tools they can use and where to find them, how to plan and conduct a data collection campaign, and how they can act.

This a great opportunity to reach an audience of DIY Citizen Scientists interested in taking action in their own communities, or researchers interested in the Citizen Science method.

For more information please contact Adam Morris – Engagement Officer

Photo of the week: ‘The Place: A health and fitness shop’

Telling a story of research through photography

The ‘photo of the week’ is a weekly series featuring photographs taken by BU academics and students for our Research Photography Competition which took place earlier this year.

These provide a snapshot into some of the incredible research taking place across the BU community. 

This week’s photo of the week was taken by PhD Student Orlanda Harvey and is titled;

‘The Place: A health and fitness shop’

‘The placement of this model of the Incredible Hulk outside a health and gym store embodies one of the initial findings from my research. Part of my exploration into the experiences of men who use Anabolic Androgenic Steroids (AAS) evidences that one driver for building muscle is the link between muscularity and masculinity. Interviewees referenced the influence of social media images and ‘ripped’ celebrities as a reason for the current increase in use of AAS for recreational purposes and others talked about the muscular physique as being ‘what women want’.

‘Using hyper-muscular images, such as the Incredible Hulk to encourage people to purchase supplements, which have been found to illegally include AAS (Evans-Brown et al. 2012). This is tapping into the trend for men to have increasingly muscular physiques. This trend is seeping into western cultural norms and has influenced the design of toys, e.g. the chest sizes of G.I. Joe and Barbie’s Ken (Brownell and Napolitano 1995, Pope Jr. et al. 2016) have significantly increased, unrepresentative of achievable norm. Men, like women, are bombarded with unrealistic images of body shape, which could encourage some to take potentially risky routes such as using AAS to try to achieve the ‘ideal’.

If you have any questions about the Photo of the Week series or the Research Photography Competition please email research@bournemouth.ac.uk

Photo of the Week: ‘Cost-effective and energy-efficient solution for smart cities’

Telling a story of research through photography

The ‘photo of the week’ is a weekly series featuring photographs taken by BU academics and students for our Research Photography Competition which took place earlier this year.

These provide a snapshot into some of the incredible research taking place across the BU community. 

This week’s photo of the week was taken by Neetesh Saxena and is titled;

Cost-effective and energy-efficient solution for smart cities’

This image focuses on the solar and wind energy, which can be utilised in the upcoming smart cities to make the system more efficient, self-manageable, and optimised resourced, and also a cost-effective and mostly available energy resource for the smart devices.

Neetesh Saxena’s research focuses on the system’s efficiency and security aspects.

If you have any questions about the Photo of the Week series or the Research Photography Competition please email research@bournemouth.ac.uk

Photo of the Week: Malnutrition Awareness Week

Telling a story of research through photography

The ‘photo of the week’ is a weekly series featuring photographs taken by BU academics and students. These provide a snapshot into some of the incredible research taking place across the BU community. 

As part of Malnutrition Awareness week, we’re featuring photographs taken by Dr Emmy van den Heuvel, Prof. Katherine Appleton and Prof. Jane Murphy

‘BU researchers show that providing new recipes can encourage older adults to eat more eggs’

‘We invited some older adults to Bournemouth University to try out our recipes. We have previously completed a Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) for which older adults received high-protein egg-based recipes. We showed that by providing these new ideas for high protein meals, we could increase egg intake up to 12 weeks after the intervention. Eggs are a good source of protein, and are relatively easy to prepare, easy to chew, have good value for money and a long shelf life. We know that older adults need more protein, but tend to eat less, so it is very important to find ways to increase protein intake using interventions that people can keep up at home.

This week is Malnutrition Awareness Week, and with the rapid increase in British older adults, it is increasingly important to focus on finding strategies to maintain and improve good health and well-being in the older population.

Find out more about the project here

If you have any questions about the Photo of the Week series please email: research@bournemouth.ac.uk

Photo of the week ‘Safe swim: Supporting physical activity and well being for transgender young people’

Telling a story of research through photography

The ‘photo of the week’ is a weekly series featuring photographs taken by BU academics and students for our Research Photography Competition which took place earlier this year.

These provide a snapshot into some of the incredible research taking place across the BU community. 

This week’s photo of the week was taken by Jayne Caudwell & Carly Stewart and is titled;

‘Safe swim: Supporting physical activity and well being for transgender young people’

This qualitative research project involves a local Bournemouth-based transgender group. It focuses on their swim-related activities to explore the benefits of water-based physical activity. Statistics demonstrate that LGBT+ have higher levels of anxiety, depression, and suicidal feelings as a consequence of feeling isolated, and experiences of rejection and bullying. Transphobia and public scrutiny of transgender bodies negatively impacts the daily lives of transgender and gender non-conforming individuals. There is evidence that swimming as a form of physical activity can enhance subjective well being. However, the places of sport and physical activity, specifically swimming pools are not always welcoming to transgender and gender non-conforming participants. Currently, the group privately hires a local pool and by invitation the researchers (Caudwell and Stewart) have attended on four occasions. Participant observation and semi-structured interviews have identified that group members look forward to and enjoy attending the sessions. The photograph celebrates members of the group being physically active and playful in the in-door place of a swimming pool. Aside: The group have given their consent for the photograph to be submitted to the Research Photography Competition.

(The researchers have obtained BU ethical clearance for the research project. The researchers completed the swimming pool’s required procedure to take photographs)

If you have any questions about the Photo of the Week series or the Research Photography Competition please email: research@bournemouth.ac.uk

Photo of the week: ‘Environmental impact of the Rohingya refugee crisis in a photo’

Telling a story of research through photography

The ‘photo of the week’ is a weekly series featuring photographs taken by BU academics and students for our Research Photography Competition which took place earlier this year.

These provide a snapshot into some of the incredible research taking place across the BU community. 

This week’s photo of the week was taken by Mehidi Chowdhury and is titled;

‘Environmental impact of the Rohingya refugee crisis in a photo’

‘The photo has been taken during my visit to the Kutupalong Rohingya refugee camp, Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh. The Kutupalong camp is the largest refugee camp in the world hosting more than half a million refugees. The visit funded by BU’s Global Challenges Research Fund took place in August 2018; one year after the latest mass exodus of Rohingya people from Myanmar to Bangladesh. The environmental impact of the crisis is visibly devastating. Forest areas have been cleared to make shelters for refugees. No large trees, birds and animals can be seen. I saw some Rohingya and local Bangladeshi settlements side by side. The demarcation is clear: Bangladeshi settlements are covered with trees and Rohingya settlements are not. The photo captures just that’

If you have any questions about the Photo of the Week series or the Research Photography Competition please email research@bournemouth.ac.uk