Posts By / djohn

Researching “Scored Out”: a portable testimony to Vasilishki for 3 musicians

We would like to invite you to the next research seminar for the Centre for Games and Music Technology Research.

Title: Researching “Scored Out”: a portable testimony to Vasilishki for 3 musicians

Speaker: Dr Thomas Gardner (London College of Communication)

Time: 1:00PM-2:00PM

Date: Wednesday 13 November 2019

Room: F204 (Fusion Building)

Abstract: The project aims to research, realise and publicly stage a performance environment inspired by the complex memories of the town Vasilichki, a Jewish shtetl in Belarus erased by the Nazi’s in 1942.

The talk will discuss the multi-faceted research process and the challenges of integrating biographical, historical and aesthetic viewpoints – work which not only engages with history but also, to some extent, rewrites it.

The work draws on a personal archive of correspondence from the town and critically engages with the synagogue tradition of cantillation and pre-20th century German music to create hybrid scores.  These will re-configure the encounters between the two cultures and, through new listening, mediate the legacy of trauma.

Further information can be found here: https://scoredout.home.blog

 

We hope to see you there!

Blind Quality Estimation by Disentangling Perceptual and Noisy Features in High Dynamic Range Images

We would like to invite you to the next research seminar for the Centre for Games and Music Technology Research.

Title: Blind Quality Estimation by Disentangling Perceptual and Noisy Features in High Dynamic Range Images

Speaker: Dr Giuseppe Valenzise
French Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS)

Time: 1:00PM-2:00PM

Date: Monday 13 May 2019
(Please note the different of time and day of the week from the other seminars in this series)

Room: F111 (Fusion Building)

Abstract: High Dynamic Range (HDR) image visual quality assessment in the absence of a reference image is challenging. This research topic has not been adequately studied largely due to the high cost of HDR display devices. Nevertheless, HDR imaging technology has attracted increasing attention because it provides more realistic content, consistent to what the Human Visual System perceives. We propose a new No-Reference Image Quality Assessment (NR-IQA) model for HDR data based on convolutional neural networks. The proposed model is able to detect visual artifacts, taking into consideration perceptual masking effects, in a distorted HDR image without any reference. The error and perceptual masking values are measured separately, yet sequentially, and then processed by a Mixing function to predict the perceived quality of the distorted image. Instead of using simple stimuli and psychovisual experiments, perceptual masking effects are computed from a set of annotated HDR images during our training process. Experimental results demonstrate that our proposed NR-IQA model can predict HDR image quality as accurately as state-of-the-art full-reference IQA methods.

Bio: Giuseppe Valenzise completed a master degree and a Ph.D. in Information Technology at the Politecnico di Milano, Italy, in 2007 and 2011, respectively. In 2012, he joined the French Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) as a permanent researcher, first at the Laboratoire Traitement et Communication de l’Information (LTCI) Telecom Paristech, and from 2016 at the Laboratoire des Signaux et Systmes (L2S), CentraleSupelec Université Paris-Sud. His research interests span different fields of image and video processing, including high dynamic range imaging, video quality assessment, single and multi-view video coding, applications of machine learning to image and video analysis. He is co-author of more than 70 research publications and of several award-winning papers. He is the recipient of the EURASIP Early Career Award 2018. Dr. Valenzise serves as Associate Editor for IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems for Video Technology, as well as for Elsevier Signal Processing: Image communication. He is a member of the MMSP and IVMSP technical committees of the IEEE Signal Processing Society for the term 2018-2020, as well as a member of the Special Area Team on Visual Information Processing of EURASIP.

 

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What Web Science Tells Us About the Unethical Future of Games

We would like to invite you to the next research seminar for the Centre for Games and Music Technology Research.

https://i0.wp.com/www.davidmillard.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/webscience-blog.jpg?resize=750%2C410&ssl=1Title: What Web Science Tells Us About the Unethical Future of Games
Speaker: Dr. David Millard
University of Southampton

Date: Wednesday 1 May 2019

Time: 2:00PM-3:00PM

Room: Create LT (Fusion Building)

Abstract:

Web Science is the study of the web as a social technical system. It enables us to understand how digital technology has led to many of the significant challenges faced by our society today (such as mass surveillance, fake news, and the rise of popularism). I have worked for more than a decade on these questions, and recently have started to ask what Web Science might have to say about my other area of research: interactive narratives, particularly locative and mixed reality storytelling. I have been forced to acknowledge that these technologies are also ripe for subversion, and that we are already seeing the first signs of how problematic they may become. In this presentation I will explain the history of Web Science, look at examples of what it tells us about the uses and abuses of digital technology, and consider some of the challenges that lie ahead for locative and mixed reality systems in the unethical future of games.

 

We hope to see you there!

Audio-Visual-Olfactory Resource Allocation for Tri-modal Virtual Environments

We would like to invite you to the next research seminar for the Centre for Games and Music Technology Research.

Title: Audio-Visual-Olfactory Resource Allocation for Tri-modal Virtual Environments

Speaker: Dr Carlo Harvey

Birmingham City University

 

Time: 2:00PM-3:00PM

 

Date: Wednesday 27 February 2019

 

Room: TAG02 (Tolpuddle Annex)

 

Abstract:

 

Virtual Environments (VEs) provide the opportunity to simulate a wide range of applications, from training to entertainment, in a safe and controlled manner. For applications which require realistic representations of real world environments, the VEs need to provide multiple, physically accurate sensory stimuli. However, simulating all the senses that comprise the human sensory system (HSS) is a task that requires significant computational resources. Since it is intractable to deliver all senses at the highest quality, we propose a resource distribution scheme in order to achieve an optimal perceptual experience within the given computational budgets. This talk investigates resource balancing for multi-modal scenarios composed of aural, visual and olfactory stimuli. Three experimental studies were conducted. The first experiment identified perceptual boundaries for olfactory computation. In the second experiment, participants (N = 25) were asked, across a fixed number of budgets (M = 5), to identify what they perceived to be the best visual, acoustic and olfactory stimulus quality for a given computational budget. Results demonstrate that participants tend to prioritise visual quality compared to other sensory stimuli. However, as the budget size is increased, users prefer a balanced distribution of resources with an increased preference for having smell impulses in the VE. Based on the collected data, a quality prediction model is

proposed and its accuracy is validated against previously unused budgets and an untested scenario in a third and final experiment.

 

We hope to see you there!

 

Creative Technology Narrative Research Show Case

We would like to invite you to the next research seminar of the Centre for Games and Music Technology Research.

Title: Creative Technology Narrative Research Show Case


Time: 2:00PM-3:00PM

Date: Wednesday 21 November 2018

Room: F112 (Fusion Building)

Abstract: The department of creative technology has an increasing number of student led research projects in the domain of interactive narrative. For this seminar we presents 3 short presentations from doctoral students in this area who are soon to present their work at international conferences:

Farbod Shakouri – Connected Tangible Objects for Augmented Reality Narratives
Introduction to exploring effective augmented space for interactive narratives, using connected tangible devices for real-time feedback.

Weilai Xu – Generating Stylistic Dialogues for Narratives
A discussion on presenting an approach for stylistic narrative dialogue generation and our dialogue modelling progress.

Daniel Green – Discoverable Narrative & Authoring Tools
A discussion on representing discoverable/observable narrative in games, authoring tools accessibility, our authoring system’s progress, and an upcoming experiment.
 
We hope to see you there

10 years of graphics and serious games research

We would like to invite you to the first research seminar of the new academic year for the Centre for Games and Music Technology Research.

Title: 10 years of graphics and serious games research

Speaker: Dr Vedad Hulusic
Bournemouth University

Time: 2:00PM-3:00PM

Date: Wednesday 17 October 2018

Room: F112 (Fusion Building)

Abstract:
As a new member of the Games team, CT, SciTech, in this talk I will give an overview of my work over the past 10 years. I will start with my early research career, as a PhD student at the University of Warwick, where I worked on auditory-visual cross-modal interaction for computer graphics. I will then present some work on virtual reconstruction of cultural heritage I have done in Bosnia and Herzegovina, where I worked as an Assistant Professor. In 2015 I moved to France (Télécom ParisTech) where I worked on high dynamic range imaging (HDRi), and image and video quality assessment. Finally, I will talk about serious games for children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), the area I work in for the past 6 years and the current main area of interest. Here, I will cover some basic aspects of the theoretical framework we used for creation of our games, as well as main findings and plans for future.

We hope to see you there!

Halldorophones: Story as Material for Musical Instrument Design

We would like to invite you to the latest research seminar of the Centre for Games and Music Technology Research.

Title: Halldorophones: Story as Material for Musical Instrument Design.

Speaker: Halldór Úlfarsson

University of Sussex

 

Time: 2:00PM-3:00PM

 

Date: Wednesday 23 May 2018

 

Room: TA131 (Talbot Annex)

 

Abstract:

 

Halldór Úlfarsson talks about his electro acoustic string instrument the halldorophone. This instrument is enjoying a modicum of success, having been used by projects such as The Knife, Sunn and featured in scores of Hollywood films such as Arrival as well as being used by classically trained composers and performers. It originally grew out of a visual arts practice where the considerations for its development were equally narrative as well as musical.

 

Halldór had his basic training in visual art, has an MA in design and is currently a PhD researcher in Music at the University of Sussex under the supervision of Chris Kiefer and Thor Magnusson.

 

We hope to see you there.

Locative Narrative: Location Aware Interactive Storytelling Research in Creative Technology

We would like to invite you to the latest research seminar of the Centre for Games and Music Technology Research.

 

Title: Locative Narrative: Location Aware Interactive Storytelling Research in Creative Technology​

 

Speaker: Dr Charlie Hargood

Senior Lecturer In Games Technology, SciTech

 

Time: 2:00PM-3:00PM

 

Date: Wednesday 2 May 2018

 

Room: TAG 02 (Tolpuddle Annex)

 

Abstract:

Locative Narrative is a growing research area concerned with digital interactive stories which respond to the reader’s location. In this talk we reflect on recent research in this space, its outcomes, and how it has led to the current programme of research on narrative systems within the creative technology department.

 

 

We hope to see you there.

Art, War and Peace

Update: Please note the change in venue due to high degree of interest in the talk – Shelley Lecture Theatre  (Poole House)

 

We would like to invite you to the latest research seminar of the Centre for Games and Music Technology Research.

 

Title: Art, War and Peace

Speaker: Nigel Osborne
Composer

By Source (WP:NFCC#4), Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=57139168

 

Time: 2:00PM-3:00PM

 

Date: Wednesday 25 April 2018

 

Room: Shelley Lecture Theatre  (Poole House)

 

Abstract:

The presentation begins with an overview of the relationship between art, war and peace, from Sun Tzu and Ancient Greek and Chinese celebration of war in art to the war poets and musicians of the First and Second World Wars, and then on to the work of activists such as Janusz Korczak (Henryk Goldszmit) in the Warsaw Ghetto and Friedl Dicker-Brandeisova in Terezin (Theresienstadt).

The presentation then examines three case studies in detail, including film and Audio clips – 1. art as opposition to conflict (The Cellist of Sarajevo, the Obala Gallery) 2. art in reconciliation (the case of a young musician who re-united the young people of a city divided by war) 3. art as trauma therapy (a group of children in Syria, a group of abused women in Bosnia)

 

Biography:

Nigel Osborne MBE BA BMus (Oxon) DLitt FRCM FEIS FRSE, Emeritus Professor of Music and Human Sciences at the University of Edinburgh is a composer, teacher and aid worker. His works have been performed around the world by major orchestras and opera houses, such as the Vienna Symphony, Los Angeles Philharmonic, Berlin Symphony, Glyndebourne and the Royal Opera House. He has received, among many awards, the Netherlands Gaudeamus Prize, the Opera Prize of the Radio Suisse Romande and Ville de Geneve and the Koussevitzky Award of the Library of Congress Washington. He also works in popular music, theatre and film and has a special interest in Arabic, Indian and Chinese music.

 

He studied composition at Oxford with Egon Wellesz, the first pupil of Arnold Schoenberg, and in Warsaw with Witold Rudzinski, and worked in major studios such as the Polish Radio Experimental Studio and at IRCAM in Paris. He has worked as a sailor, school teacher, health worker, aid worker and university teacher, holding a lectureship and Special Professorship at Nottingham University (1978-1987), the Reid Chair and Dean of the Faculty of Music at Edinburgh University (1989-2012), a guest Senior Professorship (C4) at the University of Hannover (1996-98) and Head of Faculty for the Vienna-Prague- Budapest Summer Academy (ISA) (2007-2014). He is currently Professor Emeritus at Edinburgh University, visiting Professor in the Drama Faculty of Rijeka University, Consultant to both the Chinese Music Institute, Peking University and the Royal Conservatoire, Bangkok, and has worked as visiting lecturer and examiner in a wide range of universities, ranging from Harvard, UCLA and CalArts to Oxford, the Sorbonne and Bologna.

 

As a teacher he has worked at all levels of learning, from nursery education to postdoctoral supervision, and continues to work in special education development in places as diverse as Scotland, Sweden, Croatia and India. He was awarded both the Queen’s Prize and Music Industry Prize for innovation in education, and was recently made Honorary Fellow of the Educational Institute of Scotland.

 

He has pioneered methods of using music and the creative arts to support children who are victims of conflict. This approach was developed during the war in Bosnia-Herzegovina (1992-95), and since then the work has been implemented widely in the Balkan region, the Caucasus (Chechnya), the Middle East (Palestine, Syria and Lebanon), East Africa and South East Asia. He was also awarded the Freedom Prize of the Peace Institute, Sarajevo, for his work for Bosnian children during the siege of the city.

 

He has worked actively in many human rights initiatives, including the Committee for the Defence of the Workers in Poland (1970-89), Citizens’ Forum (with Vaclav Havel) in former Czechoslovakia (1987- 89), for Syrian refugee support organisations and directly for the Government of Bosnia- Herzegovina during the genocide.

He is advisor to Oliver Sachs’ Institute for Music and Neurologic Function at Beth Abraham Hospital, The Bronx, NYC, and in 2012-14 served as co-Chair of the Global Agenda Committee for Arts in Society for the World Economic Forum.

 

In recent months he has been working on an opera/film with Ulysses Theatre and Paradiso Films on the Cambridge spies, a musical/ecological work for Khazanah, Kuala Lumpur, a cantata based on the experiences of refugees and on an orchestral version of the Beatles’ Sgt Pepper, to mark the 50th anniversary of the issue of the album (June 2017).

 

Nigel is working with Opera Circus on a new chamber opera, Naciketa, with libretto by Ariel Dorfman. The premiere will be at the Queen Elizabeth Hall, Southbank London in May 2020.

 

In December 2017 Nigel Osborne was presented with the British Composer Award UK for Inspiration (in association with the Music Publishers Association) by Opera Circus Artistic Director, Tina Ellen Lee.

 

 

We hope to see you there.

Subjective Evaluation of High-Fidelity Virtual Environments for Driving Simulations

We would like to invite you to the latest research seminar of the Centre for Games and Music Technology Research.

Title: Subjective Evaluation of High-Fidelity Virtual Environments for Driving Simulations

Speaker: Dr Carlo Harvey
Birmingham City University

Time: 2:00PM-3:00PM
Date: Wednesday 14 March 2018
Room: PG10 (Poole House)

Abstract:

Virtual environments (VEs) grant the ability to experience real-world scenarios, such as driving, in a virtual, safe, and reproducible context. However, to achieve their full potential, the fidelity of the VEs must provide confidence that it replicates the perception of the real-world experience. The computational cost of simulating real-world visuals accurately means that compromises to the fidelity of the visuals must be made. This talk presents a subjective evaluation of driving in a VE at different quality settings. Participants (n = 44) were driven around in the real world and in a purposely built representative VE and the fidelity of the graphics and overall experience at low-, medium-, and high-visual settings were analysed. Low quality corresponds to the illumination in many current traditional simulators, medium to a higher quality using accurate shadows and reflections, and high to the quality experienced in modern movies and simulations that require hours of computation. Results demonstrate that graphics quality affects the perceived fidelity of the visuals and the overall experience. When judging the overall experience, participants could tell the difference between the lower quality graphics and the rest but did not significantly discriminate between the medium and higher graphical settings. This indicates that future driving simulators should improve the quality, but once the equivalent of the presented medium quality is reached, they may not need to do so significantly.

We hope to see you there.

Encounters in space and place: immersive environment construction for the concert hall and beyond

We would like to invite you to the latest research seminar of the Creative Technology Research Centre.

source: https://pbs.twimg.com/media/AyFAucgCAAAkMwp.jpg:large

Title: Encounters in space and place: immersive environment construction for the concert hall and beyond

 

Speaker: Peter Batchelor

Composer and Sound Artist

De Montfort University

 

Time: 2:00PM-3:00PM

 

Date: Wednesday 14 February 2018

 

Room: F309, Fusion Building

 

Abstract:
Peter Batchelor will be speaking about the construction and fabrication of environments in acousmatic music and its transferability to all sort of sound design. Looking at the exploration of all of these concepts within the concert hall and outside (i.e. installations—gallery and public) over multiple channels. He’ll also talk about trompe l’oreille as well (illusory soundscapes).

 

Biography:
Peter Batchelor is a composer and sound artist living in Birmingham, UK. He has studied with Jonty Harrison and Andrew Lewis and is currently a lecturer at De Montfort University, Leicester.

 

His music draws strongly on the aesthetics and compositional concerns of the acousmatic tradition, but uses this heritage as a springboard to investigate a variety of other genres and presentation formats for electroacoustic media including radiophonic documentary, live-electronics and improvisation, multimedia and large-scale multi-channel installation work.  More recently his interest has shifted towards site-specific public (sound) art, including the fabrication of aural landscapes and sonic illusion (trompe l’oreille).

 

His work has received recognition from such sources as the Concours de musique electroacoustique de Bourges and the International ElectroAcoustic Music Contest of São Paulo and has been presented internationally.

 

We hope to see you there.

Spheroid of Performance, Algorithm and Speculative Nature in Spatial Texture

We would like to invite you to the latest research seminar of the Creative Technology Research Centre.

 

Title: Spheroid of Performance, Algorithm and Speculative Nature in Spatial Texture

Speaker: Dr Erik Nyström

Composer and Performer

Leverhulme Research Fellow at The University of Birmingham

 

Date: Wednesday 15th November 2017

Time: 2:00PM-3:00PM

Room: Lawrence LT, Poole House, Talbot Campus

 

Abstract

 

This session uses the author’s live computer music work Spheroid as point of departure for discussing an approach to electronic music practice based on real-time composition/performance of spatial texture interior, also branching out into related topics of synthesis, spatiality and ontology of sound.

Presenting research undertaken as part of a Leverhulme Early Career Fellowship at University of Birmingham, the lecture engages in both practical and conceptual reflection on how an ostensibly acousmatic sonic terrain responds to the composition of potential rather than fixed morphology, describing a step towards a practice which attempts at achieving the richness and complexity of studio-composed multichannel music in a format that is entirely real-time and not reliant on absolute structure. This reflects a central aesthetic and conceptual emphasis on music as a process of becoming, where notions of composer, performer, material, structure, are all considered part of a synthesis which has no independent elements. The ‘spheroid’, described both as an irregularly revolving algorithm for textural growth, embedding and responding to performance, and as the physical and virtual sphere of interaction between human, nature and technology, also invites some interdisciplinary modes of thinking concerning the ‘human’ in the music of our age.

 

Biography

 

Erik Nyström is a composer and performer whose output includes live computer music, electroacoustic works, and sound installations. He is currently a Leverhulme Research Fellow at Birmingham Electro-Acoustic Sound Theatre, University of Birmingham, UK, developing new aesthetic and technological approaches for spatial texture synthesis in composition and performance. His studies include a PhD in electroacoustic composition with Denis Smalley at City University, London, and computer music at CCMIX, Paris. He performs frequently worldwide and his music has been released by empreintes DIGITALes.

 

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Perceptually-Motivated Rendering – Frame Rate Vs. Resolution

We would like to invite you to the first of a new series of research seminars of the Creative Technology Research Centre featuring external speakers.

 

Speaker: Dr Kurt Debattista

Dr Debattista is an Associate Professor at the University of Warwick specialising in Visualisation Research. His research interests include Interacting rendering, High-fidelity graphics, Perceptually-based rendering, High Dynamic Range Imaging, Parallel Computing, and Serious Games.

https://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/sci/wmg/people/profile/?wmgid=518

 

Title: Perceptually-Motivated Rendering – Frame Rate Vs. Resolution

Time: 2:00PM-3:00PM

 

Date: Wednesday 18th October 2017

 

Room: Lawrence LT, Poole House, Talbot Campus

 

Abstract: High-fidelity graphics permit the visualisation of complex scenarios for applications such as simulation, engineering, archaeology, entertainment etc. Unfortunately, high-fidelity graphics can be computationally expensive and therefore scenarios cannot always be rendered to their highest fidelity. However, the human visual system (HVS) is not infallible and if well understood could be used to develop and implement rendering systems that best exploit its characteristics resulting in perceptually better graphics. Maximising performance for rendered content requires making compromises on quality parameters depending on the computational resources available. Yet, it is currently unclear which parameters best maximise perceived quality. In this talk this is illustrated by recent work attempting to harness the relationship between frame rate and resolution on perceived quality to obtain more cost-effective virtual experiences.

 

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Intelligent Transportation Analytical Model for SMEs Coach Operators

We would like to invite you to the latest research seminar of the Centre for Games and Music Technology Research.

Speaker:             Siti Aishah Mohd Selamat

(Bournemouth University PhD student based at County Coaches UK LLP, Luton)

Title:     Intelligent Transportation Analytical Model for SMEs Coach Operators

Time: 2:00PM-3:00PM

Date: Wednesday 31st May 2017

Room: PG11, Poole House, Talbot Campus

Abstract: The transportation industry is the key economic driver of any country and also an essential component in one’s daily routine. The evolution of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) in the last two decades has helped the authorities in solving underpinning traffic challenges such as curbing road congestion, road safety, road surveillance and much more.

 

With the advancement of technology in the 21st Century, data is increasingly collected every hour, every minute and every second causing a data explosion era. The International Data Corporation (IDC) forecast that the volume of data is expected to grow up to 50 Zettabytes globally by the year 2020. Extracting strategical information from the data can revolutionize the development of ITS, by shaping a traditional technology-driven system into a more robust ITS ecosystem.

 

According to Eurostat, the transportation and the storage enterprise made up of 5% of the 22.3 million of the non-financial business economy in 2012.  Despite the momentous potential benefits of big data analytics utilization, the transportation SMEs are lagging behind in their adoption efforts. In a volatile economic environment, SMEs in the transportation sector needs to be proactive in utilizing its data asset at hand to pre-empt future circumstances in order to remain competitive and relevant.

 

We hope to see you there.

Using user-customized touch gesture for fast accessing installed apps on smartphones

We would like to invite you to the latest research seminar of the Centre for Games and Music Technology Research.

 

Speaker: Chi Zhang (Creative Technology PhD Student)

 

Title:     Using user-customized touch gesture for fast accessing installed apps on smartphones

 

Time: 2:00PM-3:00PM

Date: Wednesday 17th May 2017

Room: PG11, Poole House, Talbot Campus

 

Abstract:

 

User-defined touch gesture is a common method for fast interacting with smartphones, it enables a user to define a touch gesture for a particular task, such as, “-” for volume down and “+” for volume up. But, the user-defined touch gesture method is typically provided as a “user-defined touch gesture set” aiming for countable commonly used tasks. These approaches are aiming to build a gesture set, include a limit number of universal gesture-task pairs developed by the users.  Existing user defined touch gesture sets supported a wide range of tasks on the smartphones, however, they: (1) still need learning; (2) cannot cover every task that user wants to active; (3) lack of the evaluation on the speed performance. To overcome these limitations and better understand the speed advantage of user-defined touch gesture method, we presented a novel user-customized touch gesture approach and conducted an experiment to evaluate its speed advantages. The experiment demonstrates a significant speed advantage of using our approach and the accuracy performance is evaluated as well. In particular, our findings include: (1) our approach has a significant speed advantage than traditional interaction method; (2) our approach has no significant accuracy differences between frequent and infrequent used apps; (3) analysed what caused the failure accessing in our experiments. Based on these findings, we offer (1) further evidence of the speed benefits of using user self-defined gesture for accessing tasks; (2) design implications for the future gesture-based interface for fast accessing on smartphones.

 

We hope to see you there.

 

 

Intelligent Image Understanding

We would like to invite you to the latest research seminar of the Centre for Games and Music Technology Research.

Title: Intelligent Image Understanding

Speaker: Jing Wang

Time: 2:00PM-3:00PM

Date: Wednesday 10th May 2017

Room: PG11, Poole House, Talbot Campus

Abstract: Real data are usually complex and contain various components. For example, face images have expressions and genders. Each component mainly reflects one aspect of data and provides information others do not have. Therefore, exploring the semantic information of multiple components as well as the diversity among them is of great benefit to understand data comprehensively and in-depth. However, this cannot be achieved by current nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF)-based methods, despite that NMF has shown remarkable competitiveness in learning parts-based representation of data. To overcome this limitation, we propose a novel multi-component nonnegative matrix factorization (MCNMF). Instead of seeking for only one representation of data, MCNMF learns multiple representations simultaneously, with the help of the Hilbert Schmidt Independence Criterion (HSIC) as a diversity term. HSIC explores the diverse information among the representations, where each representation corresponds to a component. By integrating the multiple representations, a more comprehensive representation is then established. Extensive experimental results on real-world datasets have shown that MCNMF not only achieves more accurate performance over the state-of-the-arts using the aggregated representation, but also interprets data from different aspects with the multiple representations, which is beyond what current NMFs can offer.

We hope to see you there.

A Cloud-Based Collaborative Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) for the Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) in the Sultanate of Oman

We would like to invite you to the latest research seminar of the Centre for Games and Music Technology Research.

Title: A Cloud-Based Collaborative Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) for the Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) in the Sultanate of Oman.

 

Speaker: Mohammed Al hajri

Time: 2:00PM-3:00PM

Date: Wednesday 3rd May 2017

Room: PG11, Poole House, Talbot Campus

 

Abstract: It is becoming increasingly difficult to ignore the demand to migrate or to adopt cloud computing into not only companies but also educational institutions. New trends in this promising field have been playing significant and critical roles in delivering educational services and applications to stakeholders.

Oman and other developing countries could benefit from a cloud-based collaborative VLE where students and faculty members could have access to online facilities to collaborate effectively achieving the potential aims of their courses and programs. HEIs especially in Oman spend high portions of their budgets to establish and maintain IT systems while not all HEIs can afford to have their separate IT systems network due to its unaffordable cost.

This research critically assesses the current ICT infrastructure and any cloud-based collaborative initiatives used in Universities and Colleges in Oman and attempt to explore the existing VLEs in HEIs in Oman. Furthermore, the research will develop a framework which will adopt the contribution from analysing any related frameworks and models in the field or in adjacent areas. The proposed framework is aiming to make a unified and collaborative VLE that can be shared and utilised by several HEIs in Oman which will enable them to exchange and share educational resources among themselves and to reduce the cost of IT expenses in software, hardware and technical support. Thus, this research is aiming to get the maximum benefits of cloud computing to be applied in collaborative VLEs and use it as a model to improve the current IT infrastructure implemented in this environment. Also, the proposed framework can be adapted and adopted by similar developing countries.

 

We hope to see you there.

Developing a novel self-optimising femtocell network for indoor communication with mobile devices

We would like to invite you to the latest research seminar of the Centre for Games and Music Technology Research.

 

Speaker: Haseeb Qureshi (Creative Technology PhD Student)

 

Title:     Developing a novel self-optimising femtocell network for indoor communication with mobile devicesFemtoCell

 

Time: 2:00PM-3:00PM

Date: Wednesday 15th March 2017

Room: PG11, Poole House, Talbot Campus

 

Abstract:

The need for a fast and reliable wireless communication system has increased with the development of social and business activities around the world. A promising cost and energy efficient way of meeting the future traffic demands is the idea of very dense deployment of low cost, low power and self-organizing small base stations i.e. Femtocells. Self-configuring, self-optimizing and self-healing base stations have the potential to significantly increase the capacity of mobile cellular networks in the future 5G while reducing their energy consumption. The aim of this research is to consider the integration of Femtocells as Self Optimising Networks for the future communication network. An extensive and thorough research has been carried out to investigate what drawbacks of the existing communication 4G network are and whether Femtocells as a Self-Optimising network can improve the current network. In order to evaluate the algorithms for self-optimising Femtocells that have been proposed by other authors in the existing literature an evaluation criteria has been developed, and a simulating environment has been constructed. The evaluation is performed by measuring the effect that changing parameters has on the output of the environment. From the results of the evaluation a new algorithm to enhance the self-optimisation of the network will be designed and developed in a simulating environment.​

 

We hope to see you there.