Posts By / hjones

Photo of the Week: Of trees, climate, palm oil, primates and elephants

Of trees, climate, palm oil, primates and elephants

Of trees, climate, palm oil, primates and elephants

Our next instalment of the ‘Photo of the Week’ series features Dr Amanda Korstjens’ image of Sikundur, in the Leuser Ecosystem, North Sumatra.  The series is a weekly instalment which features an image taken by our fantastic BU staff and students. The photos give a glimpse into some of the fascinating work our researchers have been doing across BU and the wider community.

The Leuser ecosystem is the last stronghold of the Sumatran rhino, tiger, elephant and orang-utan. Levels of human-wildlife conflict and hunting are growing and the ecosystem is being destroyed at an alarming rate.  The Life and Environmental Sciences’ Landscape Ecology and Primatology (LEAP) team have partnered up with local conservation leaders to investigate the effect these environmental changes have.

Pictured above is Sikundur, in North Sumatra where the LEAP team are carrying out research into vegetation structure, micro-climates, and primate & elephant habitats. LEAP bring scientific understanding of how landscape scale changes to the environment affect forest structure and local micro-climate and look at how climate change may alter the survival chances of primates and elephants. LEAP’s impact aim is to provide scientifically sound underpinnings to develop mitigation strategies.

In April 2017 Dr Korstjens featured in American radio/internet show ‘The Global Journalist’ which can be viewed here.

If you’d like find out more about the research or the photo itself then please contact Dr Korstjens.

This photo was originally an entry in the 2017 Research Photography Competition. If you have any other questions about the Photo of the Week series or the competition please email research@bournemouth.ac.uk

Photo of the Week: Birthing centre in Nawalparasi, rural Nepal

Birthing centre in Nawalparasi, rural Nepal

Birthing centre in Nawalparasi, rural Nepal 

Our next instalment of the ‘Photo of the Week’ series features Professor Edwin van Teijlingen’s image of a birthing centre in rural Nepal.  The series is a weekly instalment, which features an image taken by our fantastic BU staff and students. The photos give a glimpse into some of the fascinating work our researchers have been doing across BU and the wider community.

The Centre for Midwifery, Maternal & Perinatal Health (CMMPH) visited one of the poorest parts of rural Nawalparasi District, Nepal to carry out fieldwork. The team visited a birthing centre at the health post in Thulo Khairatawa.  The photo shows the delivery room. It may look bare and basic to a westerner, but it is a major improvement compared to the situation a few years ago, thanks to financial support from Green Tara UK and Karuna Germany and health promotion support from Green Tara Nepal.

Research conducted by the CMMPH at BU evaluates the impact of (a) a health promotion intervention in the community around the birthing centre; and (b) training the maternity care providers in rural birthing centres of Nawalparasi. One obvious impact to date is the increasing number of rural women giving birth in small birthing units such as this one.

If you’d like find out more about the research or the photo itself then please contact Professor van Teijlingen

This photo was originally an entry in the 2017 Research Photography Competition. If you have any other questions about the Photo of the Week series or the competition please email research@bournemouth.ac.uk

Photo of the Week: Tracks in the sand- tracking criminals

Tracks in the sand: tracking criminals

Tracks in the sand: tracking criminals

Our next instalment of the ‘Photo of the Week’ series features Professor Matthew Bennett’s image footprints in the sand, which represents his research into tracking criminals.  The series is a weekly instalment, which features an image taken by our fantastic BU staff and students. The photos give a glimpse into some of the fascinating work our researchers have been doing across BU and the wider community.

Within our lives we leave thousands of individual footprints – in the snow, on the beach, in the park and sometimes even muddy prints on the kitchen floor!  Tracks are more numerous than any other form of trace evidence, and record a unique snap shot in time about the track-maker.  Not only do they record details of the shoes worn, but information about our body mass, style of walking and the specific wear on the soles of our shoes that record information about the history of our footfall.  Reading these clues digitally provides an important forensic tools and HEIF-funded BU research (www.DigTrace.co.uk) in this area is shaping forensic practice both in the UK and overseas.

If you’d like find out more about the research or the photo itself then please contact Professor Bennett.

This photo was originally an entry in the 2017 Research Photography Competition. If you have any other questions about the Photo of the Week series or the competition please email research@bournemouth.ac.uk

Photo of the Week: Our Experience: My Voice, My Story

Our Experience: My Voice, My Story

Our Experience: My Voice, My Story

Our next instalment of the ‘Photo of the Week’ series features Dr Maggie Hutchings image which represents BU’s Fair Access Research Project in action.  The series is a weekly instalment, which features an image taken by our fantastic BU staff and students. The photos give a glimpse into some of the fascinating work our researchers have been doing across BU and the wider community.

The Fair Access Research project brings together students and staff from across the university to develop research knowledge and expertise in the field of fair access to higher education. The team are developing an understanding of the challenges some students face in accessing and succeeding in university, how university is experienced by different groups of students and how the university can support them. The impact of the research will be felt by students and academics across the university as awareness is raised and a shift in culture is felt over time.

The photo voice method was used by BU students participating in the ‘My Voice, My Story’ research project to produce images and ‘stories’ about their experiences of being a non-traditional student. Students co-created their stories and were invited to share their experiences at an ESRC Festival of Social Sciences workshop with an invited audience of academics and widening participation practitioners. The image shows the participants’ reflections captured at the workshop through interpretations written on the table-cloths, and contributing to the data for the research. Insights were gained into the effects of arts-based social participatory research methods for eliciting deep stories to inform policy and practice.

If you’d like find out more about the research or the photo itself then please contact Dr Hutchings or Dr Vanessa Heaslip or Dr Clive Hunt who are leading the Fair Access Research Project.

This photo was originally an entry in the 2017 Research Photography Competition. If you have any other questions about the Photo of the Week series or the competition please email research@bournemouth.ac.uk

Photo of the Week: Baltic Pride: The visibility of LGBT human rights claiming

Baltic Pride: The visibility of LGBT human rights claiming

Baltic Pride: The visibility of LGBT human rights claiming

Our next instalment of the ‘Photo of the Week’ series features Dr Jayne Caudwell’s image of a Pride bus in Baltic Pride 2016.  The series is a weekly instalment, which features an image taken by our fantastic BU staff and students. The photos give a glimpse into some of the fascinating work our researchers have been doing across BU and the wider community.

This research project focuses on Baltic Pride 2016 and the politics of LGBTQ visibility. Pride parades can be important for the advocacy of LGBT human rights claims. Prides take place across the world and their histories and scales vary enormously. Some adopt en-mass celebration and carnivalesque styles, whilst others face severe opposition. Global manifestations of Pride are uneven and yet, they are connected. Many take place around the month of June because of the legacies of USA-based LGBT liberation triggered by the Stonewall Riots on June 29th, 1969 in Greenwich Village, and most rely on rainbow flags, LGBTQ-positive banners and slogans to carry the politics of global Pride.

The research explores the transnational flow of the Pride movement and associated universal human rights claims through the visuals of Baltic Pride 2016.

If you’d like find out more about the research or the photo itself then please contact Dr Caudwell.

This photo was originally an entry in the 2017 Research Photography Competition. If you have any other questions about the Photo of the Week series or the competition please email research@bournemouth.ac.uk.

Photo of the Week: ‘LandEscapes – Treading on the line of fantasy and realism’ – A high dynamic range landscape photography exhibition at the Bournemouth International Centre

‘LandEscapes - Treading on the line of fantasy and realism' - A high dynamic range landscape photography exhibition at the Bournemouth International Centre

‘LandEscapes – Treading on the line of fantasy and realism’ – A high dynamic range landscape photography exhibition at the Bournemouth International Centre

Our next instalment of the ‘Photo of the Week’ series features Rehan Zia’s exhibition ‘LandEscapes- Treading on the line of fantasy and realism’.  The series is a weekly instalment, which features an image taken by our fantastic BU staff and students. The photos give a glimpse into some of the fascinating work our researchers have been doing across BU and the wider community.

“My practice-led research is looking at exploring the best practice in high dynamic range landscape photography. I often exhibit images that I have created to acquire feedback that I could subsequently reflect upon. This image shows my latest and biggest exhibition ‘ LandEscapes – Treading on the line of fantasy and realism’ at the Bournemouth International Centre (BIC) where 35 of my images were on display from 6 December 2016 – 12 January 2017,” explains Rehan.

If you’d like find out more about the research or the photo itself then please contact Rehan.

This photo was originally entry to the 2017 Research Photography Competition. If you have any other questions about the Photo of the Week series or the competition please email research@bournemouth.ac.uk

Photo of the Week: Loxodes rex- The ‘King’ of Tropical Microbes

Loxodes rex- The ‘King’ of Tropical Microbes

Loxodes rex– The ‘King’ of Tropical Microbes

Our next instalment of the ‘Photo of the Week’ series features Hunter N. Hines’s image of the freshwater species Loxodes rex.  The series is a weekly instalment, which features an image taken by our fantastic BU staff and students. The photos give a glimpse into some of the fascinating work our researchers have been doing across BU and the wider community.

Loxodes rex is a flagship freshwater ciliate species, a large eukaryotic organism that is a single cell. The photomicrograph is an image taken in Florida (USA), using 100x magnification. This species was long believed to exist only in Tropical Africa.

This research into flagship species in new global regions questions the ideas of microbial biogeography and dispersal.  This species is 1,200µm long (1.2 millimetres!) and visible to the naked eye. The large mouth is at the top left of the image and you can see numerous food items within the cell. The many lines running down the cell are ciliary rows, which are used for swimming.

Further research into the project will reveal more flagship species in novel regions, and could uncover species which are new to the science world.

If you’d like find out more about the research or the photo itself then please contact Hunter.

This photo was originally an entry to the 2017 Research Photography Competition. If you have any other questions about the Photo of the Week series or the competition please email research@bournemouth.ac.uk

Photo of the Week: Archaeology: Hidden Landscapes

Archaeology: Hidden Landscapes

Archaeology: Hidden Landscapes

Our next instalment of the ‘Photo of the Week’ series features Ashely Green’s image which presents one of the key stages in surveying a site- georeferencing.  The series is a weekly instalment, which features an image taken by our fantastic BU staff and students. The photos give a glimpse into some of the fascinating work our researchers have been doing across BU and the wider community.

Ashely’s research is looking at the potential to detect burials prior to archaeological excavation. She is doing this by producing software that automatically detects grave-like responses in geophysical collections of data. The software will use data from sites across Ireland and South-West England to describe the geophysical signatures of medieval burial practices. These sites are surveyed at a high-resolution with a range of techniques to determine what lies beneath the ground surface and how this may affect the detection of burials.  This research aims to lessen the negative impact of modern activities on these burial sites.

This photo presents a key stage in surveying a site – georeferencing, where the survey grids and elevation profile coordinates are recorded to be associated with the corresponding geophysical data.

If you’d like find out more about the research or the photo itself then please contact Ashely.

This photo was originally an entry to the 2017 Research Photography Competition. If you have any other questions about the Photo of the Week series or the competition please email research@bournemouth.ac.uk

Photo of the Week: Pollen from a Bumblebee

Pollen from a Bumblebee

Pollen from a Bumblebee

Our next instalment of the ‘Photo of the Week’ series features Dr Paul Hartley’s image of the pollen from a bumblebee.  The series is a weekly instalment, which features an image taken by our fantastic BU staff and students. The photos give a glimpse into some of the fascinating work our researchers have been doing across BU and the wider community.

The image shows optical sections through a marsh thistle pollen grain taken using a Leica SP8 confocal microscope. Pollen grains have a morphology unique to the flowers they originate from.

Researchers in the Department of Life and Environmental Science are using this principal to establish the foraging range of bumblebees and other important pollinators. This grain of marsh thistle pollen was collected from the pollen sacks of bumblebees foraging in the Purbeck lowland heaths. Marsh thistle was not recorded in the vicinity of the bee but was recorded further afield. This illustrates that bumblebees use multiple habitat areas and wide foraging ranges to find their preferred resources.

This research supports and guides important questions regarding ecology as well as strategies to conserve a wide range of important pollinators.

If you’d like find out more about the research or the photo itself then please contact Dr Hartley.

This photo was originally an entry in the 2017 Research Photography Competition. If you have any other questions about the Photo of the Week series or the competition please email research@bournemouth.ac.uk

Photo of the Week: This is me. I am Ron.

This is me. I am Ron.

This is me. I am Ron.

Our next instalment of the ‘Photo of the Week’ series features Chantel Cox‘s image of a man named Ron.  The series is a weekly instalment, which features an image taken by our fantastic BU staff and students. The photos give a glimpse into some of the fascinating work our researchers have been doing across BU and the wider community.

Chantel explains her research and why she chose to capture a picture of Ron:

“My research is looking at the cultural processes that underpin healthcare professionals meeting the identity needs of frail older people.  It is known that a ‘loss of identity’ in a person may lead to poorer health outcomes and/or reduced engagement in therapy,”

“This photo is of Ron. I met him as I was walking past a café where he was sat outside dressed as Santa, in December. What struck me about Ron was his confidence and how he enjoys dressing up because more people engage with him. When asked to describe himself he said “I’m 68, retired and very disabled”. Despite this, he is able to support his identity needs through his physical dress. I hope that my research will enable more people like Ron to be supported in the future,” says Chantel.

If you’d like find out more about the research or the photo itself then please contact Chantel.

This photo was originally the winner of the 2017 Research Photography Competition. If you have any other questions about the Photo of the Week series or the competition please email research@bournemouth.ac.uk

Photo of the Week: Zooming in on Dietary Differences

Zooming in on Dietary Differences

Zooming in on Dietary Differences

Our next instalment of the ‘Photo of the Week’ series features Catherine Gutmann Roberts’ image of her research into the dietary differences of different species of fish.  The series is a weekly instalment, which features an image taken by our fantastic BU staff and students. The photos give a glimpse into some of the fascinating work our researchers have been doing across BU and the wider community.

This photo shows a caddisfly larva and a chironomid (non-biting midge) larva, just a couple of the macroinvertebrates, which were extracted from a young barbel gut. Barbel (Barbus barbus) is a species of fish that has been relocated from Eastern flowing rivers to Western flowing rivers in England for the purpose of recreational angling. This research will measure the dietary overlap and potential competition between the barbel and its native conspecifics, chub (Squalis cephalus), dace (Leuciscus leuciscus) and minnow (Phoxinus phoxinus). It will also determine which other factors affect diet, such as location, size of fish and their stage of development.

If you’d like find out more about the research or the photo itself then please contact Catherine.

This photo was originally an entry in the 2017 Research Photography Competition. If you have any other questions about the Photo of the Week series or the competition please email research@bournemouth.ac.uk

Photo of the Week: Tiddles- the playful data analyst!

Tiddles- the playful data analyst!

Tiddles- the playful data analyst!

Our next instalment of the ‘Photo of the Week’ series features Andrea Lacey‘s image of her cat Tiddles playing in her data transcripts.  The series is a weekly instalment which features an image taken by our fantastic BU staff and students. The photos give a glimpse into some of the fascinating work our researchers have been doing across BU and the wider community.

Andrea explains more about her research and the background behind the image.

“I’m exploring the experience of mental health student nurses first practice placement,”

“I conducted focus groups to find out what students expect to get out of their placement. I recently started analysing the data and cut up sections of the transcript. I had just placed some possible sections together when Tiddles decided to join me. Tiddles is a rescue cat who until then had never shown any interest in play. These pieces of paper were too much for her and she wouldn’t leave them alone! The more fun she was having, the more her tail was swishing! I removed her countless times yet each time she came back and rearranged my carefully placed groupings. The impact here is two-fold- Tiddles does likes play and you can never predict the frustrations involved in research!” says Andrea.

If you’d like find out more about the research or the photo itself then please contact Andrea.

This photo was originally an entry in the 2017 Research Photography Competition. If you have any other questions about the Photo of the Week series or the competition please email research@bournemouth.ac.uk

Photo of the Week: Dramaturgical study of ‘Game of Thrones’

Dramaturgical study of 'Game of Thrones'

Dramaturgical study of ‘Game of Thrones’

Our next instalment of the ‘Photo of the Week’ series features Professor Kerstin Stutterheim‘s research which is a dramaturgical study of popular HBO series Game of Thrones.  Photo of the Week is a weekly instalment, which features an image taken by our fantastic BU staff and students. The photos give a glimpse into some of the fascinating work our researchers have been doing across BU and the wider community.

My current research project is an analysis of the dramaturgy and aesthetics used to make Game of Thrones a success. This will understand the emotions and the attractiveness of this successful production. My research in the field of film dramaturgy can open the door to an understanding of the power and the techniques of audio-visual narration in performance works. Film dramaturgy can not only support our film and TV students to learn their skills but also enable people to understand film and media productions as work reflecting reality. Although ‘Game of Thrones’ is a fantasy-series, it reflects Zeitgeist- the situation we are currently living in. My research will look at how this series is representing concepts of the world we live in or our fears about it.

If you’d like find out more about the research or the photo itself then please contact Professor Stutterheim.

This photo was originally an entry to the 2017 Research Photography Competition. If you have any other questions about the Photo of the Week series or the competition please email research@bournemouth.ac.uk

Festival of Learning 2017- starts on Saturday!

Bournemouth University Festival of Learning 2016

The Festival of Learning starts this Saturday for 5 days jam-packed with over 140 free activities and events for all the family.

Running in its fifth year, the festival has returned from the Global Festival of Learning which took place in ASEAN, China and India earlier in the year. Throughout the week we have different events taking place, with the festival kicking off on our Talbot Campus for a fun-filled day of activities and events for all the family on the Saturday. We’re then taking the festival off campus on the Sunday to Poole Quay, before returning to BU in the week with exciting events and activities running through the day and evening.

Saturday 8 July

Join us for a day packed with family-fun, as we transform the campus into a hub of creativity and innovation. Everyone from toddlers, to grandparents will find something for them, with events ranging from dinosaurs, to 3D printing and microbiology.

As well as this, we have a special guest speaker Anna McNuff. Anna is an inspirational speaker, endurance athlete, adventurer and self confessed mischief maker. She’ll be joining us for the day to share tales from her adventures. Book to find out why she believes passions and dreams should be embraced and explored.

You can view and book tickets for our Saturday events here.

Sunday 9 July

We’ll be heading off campus to Poole Quay on the Sunday. You can stroll along the quay, grab an ice cream and pop over to our Festival of Learning tent. We’ve got activities for all the family including healthy eating, a pop up hospital and a visual representation of Dorset’s past.

You can view and book tickets for our Sunday events here.

Monday 10 July to Wednesday 12 July

The festival will be returning to BU with a  host of events taking place day and night Monday to Wednesday. There’s a whole array of events for everyone from families, to adults, students and professionals. So why not explore the campus and take advantage of our fantastic facilities?

You’ll find events ranging from exercise classes, to coding classes and a chance to explore one our TV studios.

Wednesday will be our global day to celebrate the Global Festival of Learning and the close of the festival for 2017. With events ranging from an international food festival, tales from our BU staff and students from ASEAN, China and India, as well looking at the region’s growing digital impact.

You can view and book tickets for events on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday here.

For more information about the Festival of Learning, please click here.

Photo of the Week: Sherlock’s Window- In search of an odourless growth medium

Sherlock's Window: In search of an odourless growth medium

Sherlock’s Window: In search of an odourless growth medium

Our next instalment of the ‘Photo of the Week’ series features Dr Andrew Whittington‘s image of a third instar blowfly larva (maggot).  The series is a weekly instalment, which features an image taken by our fantastic BU staff and students. The photos give a glimpse into some of the fascinating work our researchers have been doing across BU and the wider community.

A key aspect of forensic investigation is the assessment of the ‘window of opportunity’ during which death took place. Estimations using insects (e.g. blowflies) increase accuracy. Using blowflies to determine post-mortem period requires an understanding of the temperature dependent growth patterns that they develop through their life cycle. In order to understand this, blowfly larvae are reared on growth media in the laboratory.

Sherlock’s Window is a HEIF funded project at BU which aims to produce an odourless growth medium that can be rolled out internationally for use in forensic investigation. Illustrated here is the head of a third instar blowfly larva. Maggots have no eyes, but the protrusions at the tip of the mouth area are palps, used for feeling and manipulating food particles. The rows of black barbs that are visible are used to pull the maggot forward through the food substrate.

If you’d like find out more about the research or the photo itself then please contact Dr Whittington.

This photo was originally an entry to the 2017 Research Photography Competition. If you have any other questions about the Photo of the Week series or the competition please email research@bournemouth.ac.uk

Photo of the Week: Improving Vehicle Transportation Safety and Security

Improving Vehicle Transportation Safety and Security

Improving Vehicle Transportation Safety and Security

Our next instalment of the ‘Photo of the Week’ series features Dr Neetesh Saxena‘s image of research being undertaken to improve vehicle transportation safety and security. The series is a weekly instalment which features an image taken by our fantastic BU staff and students. The photos give a glimpse into some of the fascinating work our researchers have been doing across BU and the wider community.

This research involves securing communications efficiently among vehicles (electrical vehicles, petrol/gas vehicles, and hybrid vehicles) between the vehicles and the road side equipment. This work ensures the availability of critical information to these vehicles that will ultimately help in reducing road accidents and injuries. This work is carried out in collaboration with Georgia Tech and BU.

If you’d like find out more about the research or the photo itself then please contact Dr Saxena.

This photo was originally an entry to the 2017 Research Photography Competition. If you have any other questions about the Photo of the Week series or the competition please email research@bournemouth.ac.uk

Photo of the Week: Cretan Sea Submarine 4236

Cretan Sea Submarine 4236

Cretan Sea Submarine 4236

Our next instalment of the ‘Photo of the Week’ series features Rutherford’s image from his ongoing project entitled Submarines. The series is a weekly instalment which features an image produced by our fantastic BU staff and students. The photos give a glimpse into some of the fascinating work our researchers have been doing across BU and the wider community.

“Over more than thirty years of commercial and fine art photographic practice, I have often noticed remarkable disparities between the scenes, objects, events or moments ‘out there’ I had attempted to record – and the content of the resulting photographs. These sometimes subtle, sometimes drastic, and often unanticipated disparities between what I had seen and what the photograph shows me seem to be the result of significant differences between the ways in which we experience time and space – and the way in which the camera renders them,”

“My research investigates two inter-related notions; Whether the camera sometimes records scenes, events and moments that did not exist ‘out there’ but which were instead created by the act of photographing them and, to what extent our ability to recognise this phenomenon is impeded by the ontological and epistemological assumptions inherent within the language we use to describe what photographs ‘are’ and what they show us – for example, by describing (and thereby reinforcing the idea that) photographs are ‘taken’ rather than ‘made’”, explains Rutherford.

If you’d like find out more about the research or the photo itself then please contact Rutherford.

Or please visit Rutherford’s website: http://www.theshadowofthephotographer.co.uk/

This photo was originally an entry to the 2017 Research Photography Competition. If you have any other questions about the Photo of the Week series or the competition please email research@bournemouth.ac.uk.

FMC will be a hosting a series of researcher skills development training in June

The Faculty of Media and Communication will be welcoming Dr. John Willison from the University of Adelaide for a series of researcher development training open to all academic staff, PGR’s and colleagues in RKEO.

Dr Willison is a highly engaged and widely published academic whose expertise include the creative blending of teaching and research, researcher development and the evolution of research-oriented curricula. He is a senior lecturer in the Department of Higher Education, School of Education at the University of Adelaide, South Australia, where he coordinates the Graduate Certificate in Higher Education (GCHE) for academics from all faculties. He is currently leading a major initiative funded by the Office for Learning and Teaching considering Research Skill Development (RSD) and assessment in undergraduate and postgraduate degrees across disciplines from all faculties.

Dr Willison’s principal research interest centres on the ways that academics conceptualise and implement the development of their students’ research skills in content-rich courses. He examines the close conceptual connection between the skills associated with research in a discipline, and the skills required and developed in problem-solving, critical thinking, clinical reasoning and Work Integrated Learning. His research with graduates from various disciplinary contexts is pointing to the value graduates place on research skills once they are employed.

Click here for further details and a range of resources.

FMC have scheduled a series of tailored training events. The faculty are keen to hear the discussion and share new thinking widely across BU.

All events will take place in the Fusion Building, Talbot Campus – Room F201

The sessions are outlined below:

Thursday 29th June

Session 1: 10.00-12.00: Research Skill Development First Year to PhD

This workshop will be of interest to all academics at BU. It provides an introduction to the Research Skills Development (RSD) framework, which provides a systematic approach to the scaffolding of research into learning for students at all levels. The session will also look at how RSD can be integrated into and complement the Research Development Framework developed by Vitae, which is currently used at BU for PGT and PGR training

Session 2: 14.00 – 16.00 Enabling Research Skill Development for Higher Degree Researchers and Early Career Academics

This workshop will be of primary interest to Deputy and Associate Deans, Heads of Department, Heads of Research, Research Centre Directors, and colleagues in RKEO, amongst others who have a role in the support of postgraduate students and early career academics. It examines how the Research Skill Development (RSD) framework can be used to assist PGR students and ECRs to achieve successful outcomes at these most crucial stages in their academic careers.

Friday 30th June

Session 3: 10.00-12.00: Models for Engaged Learning and Teaching (MELT): MELT your students’ minds

This workshop will be of interest to all academics at BU. It provides an introduction to the Research Skills Development (RSD) framework, which provides a systematic approach to the scaffolding of research into learning for student at all levels. Its main focus is on the adaptation of the RSD framework to meet the particular needs of different disciplines. It will demonstrate how this adaptation can be carried out to enhance the student experience in different disciplines without losing the core strengths and consistency that the framework provides for scaffolding student learning.

Session 4: 14.00 – 16.00 Engaging teachers to enable dynamic student learning

This workshop will be of primary interest to Deputy and Associate Deans, Heads of Department, Heads of Education, Programme Leaders, and colleagues in CEL, amongst others, who have a role in the support of curriculum design, the enhancement of the student learning experience, and the conduct of research into university education. It examines how the Research Skill Development (RSD) framework can be used to scaffold learning and assessment design across curricula at all course levels. It will use data from a series of large-scale research projects that provide a critical analysis of the use of RSD in a wide range of disciplines.