Posts By / Kip Jones

CQR lunchtime seminars “In Conversation …” continue with “Social Work as Art” this Wednesday!

Following the first very successful (and jam packed!) Centre for Qualitative Research Seminar “In Conversation …” the series continues with

“Social Work as Art”

presented by Lee-Ann Fenge and Anne Quinney

Wed., 5 Oct., Royal London House 201 at 1 pm.

Give these two some arts materials or a dressing-up box, who knows what will transpire!  Mark your diaries now and join us for an intriguing conversation!

Because CQR is keen to make information available to students and staff about qualitative METHODS, the seminars are arranged somewhat differently than the typical lunchtime seminar.

We are asking TWO (or more) presenters to agree to present each research method as a CONVERSATION…first, between each other, and then with the audience.  We are also asking that no PowerPoint be used in order that it is truly a conversation and NOT a lecture. The conversations will be about a particular research method and its pros and cons, NOT research projects or outcomes.

Many of us then move next door to RLH to Naked Cafe to continue the conversations and network. Faculty and Students invited to attend!

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See you Wednesday at Royal London House 201 at 1 pm.  ALL are Welcome!!

RUFUS STONE to be Highlighted at ESRC Festival of Learning on the 7th November

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You are cordially invited to attend the gala 5th Anniversary Screening and Reception for the award-winning research based biopic, RUFUS STONE.

The Event will be held at the historic Shelley Theatre in Boscombe              

7 November from 3 p.m. until 5 p.m.

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Over the past five years, RUFUS STONE has been viewed in academic, community and service provider settings throughout the U.K. Uploaded to the Internet for just over a year, the film was viewed on line by more that 12 thousand viewers in 150 countries. It has won serveral film festival awards and was shortlisted for the AHRC Anniversary Prize in 2015.

The three-year research project behind the film’s success was part of the New Dynamics Programme of ageing in 21st Century Britain, supported by Research Councils UK. This event will hallmark this achievement and continue the film’s impact in the wider community.

We expect the gala event to atract an audience of the film’s cast and crew members, past participants in the research project, community workers and service providers, and a range of citizens, young and old, gay and straight, with an interest in LGBT history and the contributions that the film has made to myriad diversity efforts. Whether you have seen the film before, or this will be the first time on a large theatre screen, you will enjoy the occasion.

R.S.V.P. Places are limited to 150 seats only! Please register on the Eventbrite site as soon as possible to avoid being disappointed.

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CQR Kicks Off “In Conversation” Seminars this Wed 7 Sept

Centre for Qual ResearchThe Centre for Qualitative Research is kicking off its new seminar series on Wednesday 7 September at 1 pm in Royal London House RLH 201 Masterclass Suite.

New to BU and FHSS, Prof. Sam Porter (Head of Social Work & Social Sciences Dept. at FHSS) will join CQR’s Kip Jones and Caroline Ellis-Hill “in conversation” about “The Relationship between the Arts and Healthcare”.

Because CQR is keen to make information available to students and staff about qualitative METHODS, the seminars will be arranged somewhat differently than the typical lunchtime seminar.

We are asking TWO (or more) presenters to agree to present each research method as a CONVERSATION…first, between each other, and then with the audience.  We are also asking that no PowerPoint be used in order that it is truly a conversation and NOT a lecture. The conversations will be about a particular research method and its pros and cons, NOT research projects or outcomes.

The “In Conversation with …” Seminar Series will be held on the FIRST WED of each month for nine months beginning in September. They will run from 1 pm until 1:50.

We are then hoping that many will join us for a CQR ‘KoffeeKlatch’ following at Naked Cafe next to RLH after the seminar.

We anticipate that by making the CQR Seminar Series really unique and exciting that they will inspire students and academics alike to investigate the wide range of qualitative methods and expertise available at CQR, and enrich their research projects by doing so.

See the list of all nine CQR Seminars over the Academic Year.

CQR launches monthly Seminar Series “In Conversation with …”

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The Centre for Qualitative Research is kicking off its new seminar series on 7 September at 1 pm in Royal London House (RLH 201 Masterclass Suite).

New to BU and FHSS, Prof. Sam Porter (Head of Social Work & Social Sciences Dept. at FHSS) will join CQR’s Kip Jones and Caroline Ellis-Hill “in conversation” about: “The Relationship between the Arts and Healthcare”.

Mark your diaries now and join us for an intriguing conversation!

Because CQR is keen to make information available to students and staff about qualitative METHODS, the seminars will be arranged somewhat differently than the typical lunchtime seminar.

We are asking TWO (or more) presenters to agree to present each research method as a CONVERSATION…first, between each other, and then with the audience.  We are also asking that no PowerPoint be used in order that it is truly a conversation and NOT a lecture. The conversations will be about a particular research method and its pros and cons, NOT research projects or outcomes.

The “In Conversation with …” Seminar Series will be held on the FIRST WED of each month for nine months beginning in September. They will run from 1 pm until 1:50.

We are then hoping that many will join us for a CQR ‘KoffeeKlatch’ following at Naked Cafe next to RLH after the seminar.

We anticipate that by making the CQR Seminar Series really unique and exciting that they will inspire students and academics alike to investigate the wide range of qualitative methods and expertise available at CQR, and enrich their research projects by doing so.

Below is the list of Seminar dates, topics and presenters. Mark your diaries now so that you don’t miss them!

7 September

RLH 201

The relationship between the arts and healthcare” Sam Porter, Kip Jones & Caroline Ellis-Hill
5 October

RLH 201

Social Work as Art” Lee-Ann Fenge and Anne Quinney
2 November

RLH 201

Phenomenology” Jane Fry and Vanessa Heaslip
7 December

RLH 201

“Auto-biography and Auto-ethnography

 

Judith Chapman and Sarah Collard
11 January (2nd Wed.)

RLH 201

Participatory Action Research and Co-operative Inquiry”   Carole Pound and Lee-Ann Fenge
1 February

RLH 201

Appreciative Inquiry”

 

Clare Gordon and Caroline Ellis-Hill
1 March

RLH 201

Photo-elicitation” Michele Board and Jenny Hall
5 April

RLH 303

Applying Film and TV Methods to Research”

 

Trevor Hearing & Kip Jones
3 May

RLH 303

Ethnography” Janet Scammell and Jonathan Parker
7 June

RLH 201

“CAQDAS (NVIVO, MAXQDA)” Jacqueline Priego and Debbie Holley

Centre for Qualitative Research Summer Surgery Sessions

CQR logo

CQR is pleased to announce a series of appointments available to postgrad (Masters or PhD) and academic researchers considering using qualitative methods for their projects.

 The half-hour sessions with Centre for Qualitative Research Director, Dr. Kip Jones, will take place over the summer at Royal London House, Lansdowne. Anyone who is thinking of using qualitative methods and would like more information, support from CQR members, or links to  resources, are welcome to book a half-hour session to discuss their project and get feedback.
Too often research projects jump into using qualitative methods of research such as interviewing, observing, etc. without really having any background in the method or training for it. When it comes time for Vivas or publications, often these projects do not then meet expectations.  What CQR hopes to do is ensure that qualitative projects of any kind carried out at BU are vigorous.  This is the reason behind the surgeries (as well as plans for future Centre for Qualitative Research seminars and masterclasses).
It is easy to book a slot for a session. Simply email Kip (kipworld@gmail.com) stating the date of either a Tuesday (10-12 noon) or a Wednesday (1-3 pm) over the summer when you can be available. You will get an email back with your timeslot for the particular date.

CQR members have expertise in a wide range of methods. We hope through this surgery process to connect you up with a particular resourceful person.
Research as Film/Film as Research
Photo-elicitation
Grounded Theory
Performance Poetry
Ethics
Interviewing
Focus Groups
Ethnography
Participatory Action Research
Autobiography
Auto-ethnography
Biographic Narrative Interpretive Method
Appreciative Inquiry
Arts-based methods
Telephone interviews
Questionnaire design
NVIVO
Performance Poetry
Reflexivity
Performative Social Science

CQR Members Delight Norwegian Visitors—“a very memorable experience”

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Norwegian visitors and CQR Members share results of arts-based research efforts at HSS. (Photos: Anne Quinney)

Five Members of BU’s Centre for Qualitative Research (Lee-Ann Fenge; Caroline Ellis-Hill; Maggie Hutchings; Michele Board; Anne Quinney) wowed recent visitors to FHSS from Sogn og Jordane University College in Norway. The College is based in the Sogn og Fjordane University College (Førde, Norway) which is currently situated on two campuses in Forde and Songdal on the west of Norway and on the longest and deepest Fjord in the world.

Each CQR member took a turn in presenting a short and sharp ten-minute demonstration by means of sharing the outputs of an arts-based qualitative project. These included:

  1. Ephemera workshop—sharing life stories via personal objects
  2. Seen but Seldom Heard –short video screening of a poetry project with disabled youth
  3. HeART of Stroke Project—sharing of a painting project for Stroke patients
  4. Meaning of Home photo project – sharing of photo book of baby boomers’ recollections of home
  5. Methods to Diversity—sharing and distribution of Method Deck of cards to encourage LGBT and ageing awareness
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Various arts-based projects shared with Norwegian visitors. (Photos: Anne Quinney)

A screening of the award-winning, research-based short film, RUFUS STONE, then followed the five short presentations. The visiting scholars remarked that they were very moved by the film. Overall, they appreciated the nuances in the use of arts-based approaches to create as well as disseminate research projects.

CQR is known internationally as a hub of excellence in Performative Social Science, a theoretically based approach to using tools from the arts and humanities in researching and/or disseminating a wide variety of health and social science topics.

One team member remarked, “On reflection, many of the messages from the six presentations overlapped, and so we created a very coherent and deep forum by means of hands-on sharing of objects”.

Another said, “There was a real buzz in the room and the event proved a great showcase for focusing on the strengths, power, magic, beauty, depth, richness of the many and varied CQR activities”.

Elizabeth Rosser, HSS’ Deputy Dean for Education and Professional Practice, who organised the three day visit to BU, summed up the Norwegians’ response: “They were MOST impressed and felt they gained considerably from the meeting with the Centre for Qualitative Research members”.

Visitors from Norway:

  1. Dr Anne-Grethe Halding: Associate Professor, Head of Department of Health Studies
  2. Professor Maj-Britt Raholm: Professor of Nursing
  3. Dr Anne Marie Sandvoll: Head of Postgraduate Education, Faculty of Health Studies
  4. Dr Aud Marie Øien: Research lead, Faculty of Health Studies
  5. Dr Eli Natvik: Early Career researcher and academic recently commenced at the University College from clinical practice as a physiotherapist.

Stay in touch with CQR on:

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/groups/54608373386/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/BUQualitative

CQR website: https://research.bournemouth.ac.uk/centre/centre-for-qualitative-research/

 

Lots to celebrate with RUFUS STONE

Excitement as anniversaries loom and RUFUS STONE is involved in all of it!

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  • Excitement as anniversaries loom and RUFUS STONE is involved in all of it! 10th Anniversary of the LGBT tent at Glastonbury this summer where our film will feature.
  • Next, a proposal for a 5th Anniversary of the premiere of RUFUS STONE is in the mix for next November at the Shelley Theatre in Bournemouth.
  • Finally, BBC will be using our research to inform a new BBC Two film marking 50 years since the passage of the 1967 Sexual Offences Act (making homosexuality in the UK no longer punishable as a crime).

Stay tuned for further details about these events!

RUFUS STONE the movie website

Centre for Qualitative Research Partners with Publisher

CQR TQR logosBournemouth University’s Centre for Qualitative Research (CQR) is proud to announce its developing association with the online, qualitative journal, The Qualitative Report (TQR). Electronically published from Nova-Southeastern University in Florida, the journal was the first of its kind in both qualitative research and open-access publication solely on the Internet. The journal also publishes The Weekly Qualitative Report to subscribers.

CQR is envisioned as a resource for qualitative research across departments and faculties at Bournemouth University. TQR is particularly well placed to support CQR in these efforts, with its cross-discipline approach in leading-edge, qualitative publication.

CQR is particularly interested in participation in a specific TQR editorship rubric. The scheme will offer BU academics and postgrad students the opportunity to develop their editorial skills through a three-tier process of Assistant, Associate and then finally, full Editor of the journal. Further details will follow shortly.

Additional developments are also in the pipeline: possible publication in TQR Books; participation in TQR’s Annual Qualitative Conference in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, either in person or virtually; participation in Nova’s qualitative webinar series; joint research grant applications with Nova; and participation in the Graduate Certificate in Qualitative Research.

The Qualitative Report Editor-in-Chief Dr. Ron Chenail stated, “I see a future for Bournemouth and TQR supporting each other, particularly in innovation and forward-looking education, research and publication.”

Dr. Kip Jones, Director of CQR, remarked: “TQR was one of the first journals to publish my work postdoc. Rather than simply reject my early attempt at a submission, the editors worked with me to construct the best possible version of my paper on systematic review of qualitative data. It was published by TQR in 2004 and is the most frequently cited paper of all of my publications to date.”

TQR Editorial Statement

The Qualitative Report (ISSN 1052-0147) is a peer-reviewed, on-line monthly journal devoted to writing and discussion of and about qualitative, critical, action, and collaborative inquiry and research. The Qualitative Report, the oldest multidisciplinary qualitative research journal in the world, serves as a forum and sounding board for researchers, scholars, practitioners, and other reflective-minded individuals who are passionate about ideas, methods, and analyses permeating qualitative, action, collaborative, and critical study. These pages are open to a variety of forms: original, scholarly activity such as qualitative research studies, critical commentaries, editorials, or debates concerning pertinent issues and topics; news of networking and research possibilities; and other sorts of journalistic and literary shapes which may interest and pique readers.

The Qualitative Report is published by Nova Southeastern University. Its Uniform Resource Locator (URL) is http://nsuworks.nova.edu/tqr/

TQR Index and Listing Information

The Qualitative Report is indexed in Scopus, Google Scholar, ERIC, Cambridge Scientific Abstract‘s (CSA) Web Resources Database (WRD) for the Social Sciences, Gale’s Academic OneFile, EBSCO Open Access Journals, Open Science Directory, SocioSite, and All Academic. (Abbreviated list)

Update:

Nova Southeastern University, the home of The Qualitative Report, has been listed by Times Higher Education of one of the 20 ‘Rising Stars’ amongst global universities. The Times said that those listed are “globally aware and outward-looking … and focus on innovation including harnessing new partnerships”. CQR at Bournemouth University is proud to be one of Nova’s partners!

Keep in touch with further developments in this exciting association on the CQR webpages, HSS blog or follow CQR on Twitter: @BUQualitative

“Flip it!” –Kip Jones’ most frequent workshop advice

Attendants at the Creative Writing for Academics Workshop at Bournemouth University.  Some hold copies of the photograph from which they created a story.

Attendants at the Creative Writing for Academics Workshop at Bournemouth University. Some hold copies of the photograph from which they created a story.

The most frequent advice from Kip Jones to participants was “Flip it!”

“Flip it!” –Kip Jones’ most frequent workshop advice.

 

Recently, 27 academics, some from as far away as upstate New York and Dublin, gathered for the Creative Writing for Academics with Kip Jones at Bournemouth University (BU). Their goal was two days of experimentation with writing techniques to engender more creative outputs in their academic writing.

The conclusion of one participant reflected the sentiments of many: “The Creative Writing for Academics workshop turned out to be a great experience, more than expected!!”

The two-day workshop was organised by BU’s Centre for Qualitative Research, and was promoted thusly:

“This unique event isn’t a typical writing retreat (with trees to hug and lots of time to ruminate), but a very active experience with exercises, suggestions and supportive feedback on participants’ work…”

KimballFrontCover-216x300Instead of taking 30 minutes or more to go round the room and let everyone make an introduction (listing job titles, universities, theses topics, etc. ad infinitum), Jones asked attendees to take 15 minutes and write their life story on a postcard instead. This is an exercise that comes directly from Michael Kimball’s work, Michael Kimball Writes Your Life Story (on a postcard). Kimball is an American novelist whose writing Jones admires. A few examples from Kimball’s postcard book were shared with the group. Each participant then wrote her/his own life story on a postcard; afterwards, some of the attendants then shared their stories with the group.

Jones then explained tags, log lines and treatments—copywriting techniques used in advertising and filmmaking.

The Workshop as a Logline: Participants were challenged to write their “Life on a postcard”, they were introduced to creating tags and log lines; homework was to write a poem based on a dream. Next, they created a story from a photograph. Finally, they shared their stories with others who had used the same photo. (50 words)

Tag: “Artistic types take their time … in an Italian trattoria.”

Participants then had a go at creating tags and loglines for academic articles that they brought with them. This was an exercise in using simple sentences, reducing content to its essence and creating copy that could be used in titles and the body of articles, in blogs and on Twitter.

Jones used a relaxed and open-ended process throughout the workshop. Francesca Cavallerio’s extended feedback report captures the essence of the responses of many to this approach to the workshop:

I enjoyed the freedom that came from writing creatively, without prescriptions. Having no other goal than the story/poem itself was intimidating initially, but then turned into an amazing experience. I think (the workshop) allowed me to discover a few things about myself and the way I write. Also, by listening to what others wrote, and realizing how many different ways of writing exist, and how much I enjoyed each of them, gave me an increased sense of freedom and possibility.

I was expecting more “directions”, tips on “how to use creative writing in academia”. But now that we are at the end of the workshop, I think I can see why it was organised in this way. Yesterday, I would have said, “Yes, I wanted to be guided more”. Today, I am actually very happy of the structure and everything I learned, felt and experienced here. –Francesca Cavallerio, St. Mary’s University, Twickenham.

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The last morning of the workshop consisted of reading some of the poems that were written overnight. Attendants then chose from amongst 11 black and white photographs. The brief was to write a story about what the photograph was about. The only instruction was that often a photograph could represent the moment between what led up to the event captured and what might happen next. The group took the rest of the morning to write the photo-based 1,000 word stories. After lunch, they assembled in groups of three (each group having chosen the same photo) and compared stories and outcomes.

Creative Writing Photo exercise

“I feel a sense of satisfaction in having written a life-story postcard, a poem and a short story—all very personal.” –Anne Quinney, Bournemouth University

The workshop was envisaged as a way to help academics with publishing in the wider world of blogs and online outlets, moving work to mixed media, auto-ethnography, and even fiction, radio and film. Jones gave ideas of the kinds of blogs and even journals that are receptive to creative academic work. He shared experiences with his own outputs and finding like-minded editors with whom to work.

The intellectual exchanges encouraged joint exploration on how academics can engage with principles and tools from the arts in order to expand and extend their possibilities of dissemination of their work. Concepts of creativity itself evolved and were transformed by participants’ outlooks and willingness to engage with unfamiliar territory. These processes comprised a ‘facilitated learning’—in that knowledge was gained as a secondary goal through a process of developing new relationships. This was achieved through individual and small group problem-solving and self-examination, grounded in personal past experience and knowledge.

 

 

Seminar: “Performative Social Science: What it is, What it isn’t, and What it has become”

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Drs. Zoe Pool and Rosie Read appear in an AHRC film produced at BU
entitled, “Social Science Discovering its Muse” 2006.

 

Royal London House 301, Lansdowne Campus

Wednesday 20 January 1pm – 2pm

“Performative Social Science”:

What it is, What it isn’t, and What it has become”

Dr Kip Jones, Reader in Performative Social Science, Presenter

Faculties of Health & Social Sciences and Media & Communication

“Performative Social Science” was a term first coined by Norman Denzin in 2001, the year that Kip Jones received his PhD and began to explore new ways to communicate Social Science findings to wider audiences.

What is Performative Social Science (PSS) then, Art or Science? It isn’t one or the other. It is enriching the ways in which Social Science subjects might be researched and/or findings disseminated or communicated to various communities. Ideally, audiences should be almost unaware of the seams where practitioners have cobbled together in-depth, substantial scholarship with artistic endeavor. PSS is defined as the use of tools from the Arts or Humanities in investigating and/or disseminating Social Science research.

The Seminar will explore Jones’ journey from early productions produced on his PC in his bedsit, to gatherings (physical and virtual) of like-minded academics (Illustrated above), to the production of a major short film based in solid qualitative research methods including auto-ethnography, and back again to ‘kitchen sink’ work, producing creative productions which inform his future efforts.

All faculty and students at Bournemouth University are welcome.

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Centre for Qualitative Research Approved and Moves Forward

 

CQR

The Centre for Qualitative has received approval to continue as a Research Centre within Bournemouth University.  Kip Jones will act as Centre Director, with Caroline Ellis-Hill acting as Deputy Director. The Centre will be part of the new Department of Health Sciences & Public Health in the Faculty of Health & Social Sciences. Members are welcome from across departments and faculties at BU.

The Centre for Qualitative Research (CQR), a long-standing resource for research practice and postgraduate learning at BU, has recently undergone a ‘refit’ of its web pages.  Content from the old site has been moved over to the new platform for Bournemouth University groups and centres. The new format now makes it possible to link with work taking place in other Schools and research sites. In addition, Impact, Public Engagement and Postgraduate Research links feature on every page.

CQR is held in high esteem globally for its innovative work and commitment to qualitative research. The refreshed web pages provide an international ‘shop window’ for CQR, School of Health & Social Care and BU more generally in regards to cutting-edge qualitative work. CQR has always engaged across Schools at BU and welcomes new opportunities for collaborate efforts.

The new CQR pages include information, resources and links organised around the following areas of research:

In addition, areas such as Biographic Narrative Interpretive Research, Cut-up Technique and Appreciative Inquiry are covered. A new page outlining the ‘Gay and Pleasant Land? Project and Rufus Stone’ has been added. The recently organised, cross-Schools ARTS in RESEARCH (AiR) collaboration is also featured.

The new web pages include new information and resources, links to further information and even videos for viewing pleasure! Last but not least, a photo has been added as a ‘Featured Image’ highlighting the essence of each page.

Have a look around this interesting site!

Creative Writing for Academics with Kip Jones

Creative writing

Summary: The Creative Writing workshop will be a unique event in that it will not be a typical ‘writing retreat’ (with trees to hug and lots of time to ruminate), but rather a very active experience with lots of exercises, suggestions and supportive feedback on participants’ work from Kip Jones and other participants.  The point is to encourage both students and academics who would like to include more creative writing in their outputs, particularly those whose writing includes reporting on narrative and other qualitative methods of research.  It also helps immensely in the move to publishing in the wider world of blogs and online outlets, moving work to media and film, auto-ethnography and even fiction.

Justification: The important point of Creative Writing for Academics is to help academics and students achieve the goal of achieving more of their work read by wider audiences; in other words, impact. By providing an intense two-day experience for participants to engage in developing writing skills, the playing field is levelled and opportunities for facilitated learning developed. By engaging in creative writing, it becomes possible for all to write more clearly, more simply, even more creatively, when writing not only for academic publications, but also for outlets previously unimagined.

Methods: The workshop will present opportunities to work with academic material and expand its means of production and dissemination to new and creative levels through interfaces with techniques from the arts and humanities, including blog and magazine writing, film treatments and scripts, and poetry and fictional exercises. These intellectual exchanges encourage joint exploration of how researchers can engage with principles and tools from the arts in order to expand and extend the possibilities of dissemination of research data. Concepts of creativity itself will evolve and be transformed by participants’ outlooks and willingness to engage with unfamiliar territory. These processes comprise a ‘facilitated learning’—in that knowledge will be gained as a secondary goal through a process of developing new relationships through small group problem-solving and self examination, grounded in personal past experience and knowledge.

12115534_10153710964944855_4944742169117744163_nKip Jones BA MSc PhD is Reader in Performative Social Science and Qualitative Research in the Faculties of Media & Communication and Health & Social Sciences at Bournemouth University. Jones has produced films, videos and audio productions and has written many articles for academic journals and authored Chapters in books on topics such as masculinity, ageing and rurality, and older LGBT citizens. His groundbreaking use of qualitative methods, including biography and auto-ethnography, and the use of tools from the arts in social science research and dissemination, are distinguished internationally.

Workshop Price: £120. for two days. £90. for students/BU staff

Academics and students at all levels welcome!

Register online at: 

http://creative-writing-workshop.eventbrite.co.uk

Dissemination can be more than journal publications!

Join us for an ESRC Festival of Learning Event on Saturday 7 November at EBC!

Learn how in-depth research over time produced substantial findings.

Find out how these results were then turned into innovative dissemination tools.

Then learn how those tools were used by service providers (who will be attending!) and impacted on their communities.

ESRC FestAre you interested in LGBT and ageing issues?  We have tools to share to engage people about the discrimination experienced by older gay or lesbian service users and what to do about it.  These include the award-winning short film RUFUS STONE and Methods to Diversity, a deck of cards.

The aim of this event is to share our tools with you and hear the stories from others who have used them. We are inviting them to discuss how they have used the two learning tools within their organisations’ activities and get their take on our efforts.

Newcomers will received a copy of the Method Deck “Methods to Diversity” and the award-winning short biopic, RUFUS STONE.

Faculty and Students are welcome!

Facilitators Drs Lee-Ann Fenge & Kip Jones, HSS, Department of Social Work and Social Sciences

For more information and to register: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/pathways-to-impact-part-deux-tickets-18205534243

 

“Styles of Good Sense” Ethics, Filmmaking and Scholarship

Crew shooting early scene for the short, research-based film, RUFUS STONE

Crew shooting early scene for the short, research-based film, RUFUS STONE

Kip Jones’ draft Chapter for The Routledge International Handbook on Narrative and Life History was deposited today on BRIAN and Academia.edu. The book’s section on Ethics is edited by Ivor Goodson, with assistance from Ari Antikainen, Molly Andrews and Pat Sikes. Jones’ Chapter entitled, “Styles of Good Sense—Ethics, Filmmaking and Scholarship” is based upon his experience as researcher, author and producer of the award winning short film, RUFUS STONE.

Jones proposes that aesthetics and ethics need to be considered in concert and that they are at the very heart of arts-based research. Ethics and Aesthetics become intertwined and support one another. Jones states:

‘Ethics, much like aesthetics, is often misunderstood as something effusive, illusive and somehow, decision-making by the few on a rarefied echelon, involving pronouncements of grand moral impact and/or sophisticated discrimination. For these kinds of reasons and to avoid potential headaches, it is often assumed that checklists and committees will be far better at making such decisions than mere individuals.’

Jones believes that ethics and aesthetics need to remain the prerogative of the researcher/filmmaker and her/his participants and audiences. By developing a trust in instinct and intuition and the naturally expressive and moral potential of our personal resources, research involving people’s stories can become richer and more human, if we only are willing to jettison some of the baggage of the old academic rigor and dry procedural ethics.

Jones’ involvement in the section of the book on Ethics will include co-contributors Arthur Frank, Norm Denzin, Laurel Richardson and Carolyn Ellis, and will be published in the New Year.

 

 

RUFUS STONE shortlisted for AHRC Research in Film Award

Kip Rufus location

The research-based biopic RUFUS STONE has just been shortlisted for the AHRC Research in Film Anniversary Prize for best AHRC funded film since 1998.

A central strand of the activities taking place throughout 2015 to mark the AHRC’s tenth anniversary, the awards attracted nearly 200 entries across the five categories.

The awards are designed to recognise the creative and innovative work being undertaken at the interface between research and film by world-leading researchers, practitioners and filmmakers in the UK arts and humanities research community.

RUFUS STONE was based on three years of research on older LGBT citizens living in south west England and Wales. The research team was led by Kip Jones and included Lee-Ann Fenge and Rosie Read on the team.

Bournemouth’s Kip Jones acted as Author and Executive Producer, with Josh Appignanesi directing the film. RUFUS STONE was produced by Parkville Pictures, London.

More information on the research and film-making

Watch the film here.