Posts By / ntealdi

REF 2021 – Staff Data Collection Statement (Privacy Notice)

The Data Protection Act 2018 and the GDPR require institutions to inform their staff and other stakeholders as to how data about them that are submitted to the REF will be used.

 

This applies to current staff of Bournemouth University (BU) and to former BU staff we have included in our REF submission in relation to outputs produced during their time at BU.

 

BU’s published Staff and Non Staff Data Collection Statements can be found here: https://www.bournemouth.ac.uk/research/research-environment/ref-2021

 

You can access information about BU’s REF preparation via the Research Blog and if you have any general enquiries regarding the REF you can email ref@bournemouth.ac.uk. For more information about the REF 2021 nationally please visit http://ref.ac.uk/

Revised REF 2021 Code of Practice

The Research Excellence Framework (REF) Code of Practice has been revised to accommodate national changes to the REF exercise. Please ensure you familiarise yourself with the updated document which is available here:

https://www.bournemouth.ac.uk/research/research-environment/ref-2021

 

You can access information about BU’s REF preparation via the Research Blog and if you have any general enquiries regarding the REF you can email ref@bournemouth.ac.uk. For more information about the REF 2021 nationally please visit http://ref.ac.uk/

RKE News – Latest issue out now

The latest issue of RKE News is out now. The purpose of the newsletter is to provide a termly update of internal and external research and knowledge exchange news, successes and opportunities.

This issue focuses on BU2025, the Strategic Investment Areas, Research Funding Panels, some of the many funding opportunities which are available and upcoming events.

I hope this information is helpful and of interest to you. If you would like to send in any stories or ideas for inclusion or if you have any feedback in general, please let me know.

 

Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF) Best Practice Workshop

On 24 October 2019, the GCRF Panel of the University hosted the first GCRF Best Practice Workshop that brought together well-over 20 academics, GCRF Principal Investigators/Co-Investigators and interested parties to discuss best practice from existing ongoing GCRF projects and activities being undertaken at BU.

The day began with a rough guide to GCRF terminology delivered by GCRF Panel Chair, Professor Lee Miles of the BUDMC and the morning session was completed by targeted presentations by GCRF project leaders at the University on the nature and progress of their respective projects. This latter session not only provided an opportunity for all those present to have a detailed insight into the diversity of work going on at the University under GCRF auspices – from research on elephant movements in Sumatra, to disaster management scenario building and guidance in Africa and Nepal, to the challenges of utilising new technologies to communicate the views of indigenous communities in South America.

This was followed in the afternoon by detailed sessions chaired by members of the GCRF Panel on design, implementation, monitoring and reporting and synergising of GCRF projects that were not only opportunities for those at the workshop to learn some of the challenges and instances of best practice, but also provided a chance to further discuss the nuances of the respective GCRF open call competition that is presently being advertised by the University.

A vibrant and good natured discussion was a characteristic of all the respective sessions. Informal feedback has been very positive and the GCRF Panel intends to capture some of the insights and commentary of the GCRF workshop to inform its future deliberations.

“How could AI shake up Accounting and Reporting?” PwC visit the Accounting, Finance and Economics (AFE) Department of The Business School

Undergraduates studying on BU’s Accounting and Finance programme were treated to a fascinating insight into the world of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in accounting and financial reporting given by global expert Ruth Preedy who is Director, AI and IFRS Accounting at PwC.  Dr Alan Kirkpatrick, Head of Education and Professional Practice for AFE introduced the session by referring to the research question posed by Alan Turing back in 1950: “Can machines think?”, and he asked if recent technological advances have put questions such as “how well can machines learn?”, “when should we allow machines to take decisions?” and “how will AI affect the roles and required skill sets of future accountants?”, into the frame. There is a deepening discussion in financial services, the professions and wider business community about the expected impact of AI on accounting and financial reporting.

Ruth Preedy explained how AI will have an impact on all sectors.  In particular, healthcare, automotive and financial services sectors “..exhibit huge potential for high touch, high frequency and high value products and services enabled by AI”.  Analyses carried out using PwC’s Computational General Equilibrium Model for AI in 2017 estimate a potential GDP gain of US$15.7 trillion by 2030 with China and North America expected to see the biggest AI gains.  A wide definition of AI as “the theory and development of computer systems able to perform tasks normally requiring human intelligence” really includes activities such as natural language processing, machine learning, deep learning, speech recognition and machine vision.  Ruth Preedy pointed out how AI might be presented at three levels described as: Assisted Intelligence, Augmented Intelligence and Autonomous Intelligence. AI today is more likely to be seen in the form of Assisted Intelligence that is associated with “..automating repetitive, standardised or time-consuming tasks” and is resulting in increased demand for STEM skills to build a ‘new tech ecosystem’. The emerging form of AI is Augmented Intelligence that involves collaboration between humans and machines to make decisions and Ruth Preedy said that “uniquely human traits such as emotional intelligence, creativity, persuasion and innovation will become more valuable”. The highest form of AI is Autonomous Intelligence and this vision of a possible future involves what Ruth Preedy described as “adaptive continuous intelligent systems taking over decision making” that “may question the future of humans at work”.  Examples of discussions in the automotive sector for example indicate the sensitivities of Autonomous Intelligence systems.

AI is often discussed in the context of employment.  Ruth Preedy referred to estimates by PwC that around 30 per cent of jobs overall (across all sectors) could be automated in the early 2020s but the proportion of jobs usually performed by individuals with higher education (graduates) that could be automated is estimated at the much lower figure of 11 per cent.  This pattern is expected to be reflected in the accounting profession with more automation of more routine functions such as basic book-keeping and a continuing or increasing need for activities requiring higher levels of analysis.  AI is being seen in accounting and financial reporting in the form of accounting packages (XBRL), IFRS modelling, auditing, contract review and ‘chatbots’.

Overall the message is that contrary to some of the more hysterical reports there will still be a need in the future for skilled accountants exhibiting knowledge of how to get the best out of AI in performing their critical analysis and decision making functions.

 

Dr Alan Kirkpatrick

 

 

 

 

RKE News – latest issue out now

The latest issue of RKE News is now available. The purpose of the newsletter is to provide a termly update of internal and external research and knowledge exchange news, successes and opportunities.

This issue is packed full of hopefully useful information including the launch of ‘Research Development & Support’, our new Research Funding Panels, REF 2021, some of the many funding opportunities which are available and upcoming events.

I hope this information is helpful and of interest to you. If you would like to send in any stories or ideas for inclusion or if you have any feedback in general, please let me know.

RKE News issue 3 out now

The third issue of RKE News is now available. The purpose of the newsletter is to provide a termly update of internal and external research and knowledge exchange news, successes and opportunities.

This issue focuses on research at BU and BU2025, some of the many funding opportunities which are available and upcoming events.

I hope this information is helpful and of interest to you. If you would like to send in any stories or ideas for inclusion or if you have any feedback in general, please let me know.