Posts By / ocooke

Research Blog Survey

Here at RKEO we are always trying to improve the services and information we provide to our audience and the research blog has been our main tool for communicating news to our audience. The research blog has been running since its first post back in March 2011, which makes it a strong 5 years old!

With this historic achievement of age it doesn’t  mean that there isn’t room for improvement. If you have the time it would be greatly appreciated if you could fill out thisquick survey about the research blog. This will allow us to improve the site and in turn provide a better service for you!

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UG Talks

The Undergraduate Talks (UG Talks) is an exciting new opportunity for members of Bournemouth University and the public to learn about the innovative research being conducted by BU’s undergraduate Population. Each talk will last 3 minutes with a chance for Q&A afterwards.

If you would like to present your research, then in order to secure your place at this exciting event, you must send a title and brief overview of your research to Oliver Cooke. There are only 10 spaces available, so you must submit your work as soon as possible!

We already have quite a few talks covering these subjects:

  • Copyright law
  • Social media in Politics
  • Games design
  • Costal management
  • Sports nutrition
  • Roman Britain
  • And much more!

Time and Date: Thursday 5th of May, 12pm – 2pm

Location: 5th Floor, Student Centre,Bournemouth University, Talbot Campus.

If you are interested in attending this event, then you can book on here.

If you have a questions about the event or you would like to present please email Oliver Cooke for details.

 

Front of postcard

RSB Science Communication Awards

The Royal Society of Biology Science Communication Awards 2016 are open for applications.

If you’re a bioscience researcher, working in any sector of UK biosciences – from universities, institutes or industry – then consider applying. Supported by the Wellcome Trust, the Awards are intended to reward outreach work carried out by both young scientists and established researchers to inform, enthuse and engage the public.

There are two categories: New Researcher Prize (£750) and Established Researcher Prize (£1500).

Please forward to any great science communicators!

More info: http://www.rsb.org.uk/scicomm

Deadline: Thursday 30 June 2016

Contact: karen.patel@rsb.org.uk

There are also a few places left on our Science Communication Workshop

18.04.16 | 09:00 – 17:00 | Charles Darwin House, London, WC1N 2JU Find out more and register: https://www.rsb.org.uk/events?event_id=1196

Research Blog Survey

Here at RKEO we are always trying to improve the services and information we provide to our audience and the research blog has been our main tool for communicating news to our audience. The research blog has been running since its first post back in March 2011, which makes it a strong 5 years old!

With this historic achievement of age it doesn’t  mean that there isn’t room for improvement. If you have the time it would be greatly appreciated if you could fill out this quick survey about the research blog. This will allow us to improve the site and in turn provide a better service for you!

21FD6083B5F5C05F6562C774DBE189B9

Research Blog Survey

Here at RKEO we are always trying to improve the services and information we provide to our audience and the research blog has been our main tool for communicating news to our audience. The research blog has been running since its first post back in March 2011, which makes it a strong 5 years old!

With this historic achievement of age it doesn’t  mean that there isn’t room for improvement. If you have the time it would be greatly appreciated if you could fill out this quick survey about the research blog. This will allow us to improve the site and in turn provide a better service for you!

21FD6083B5F5C05F6562C774DBE189B9

Research Blog Survey

Here at RKEO we are always trying to improve the services and information we provide to our audience and the research blog has been our main tool for communicating news to our audience. The research blog has been running since its first post back in March 2011, which makes it a strong 5 years old!

With this historic achievement of age it doesn’t  mean that there isn’t room for improvement. If you have the time it would be greatly appreciated if you could fill out thisquick survey about the research blog. This will allow us to improve the site and in turn provide a better service for you!

21FD6083B5F5C05F6562C774DBE189B9

Research blog Survey

Here at RKEO we are always trying to improve the services and information we provide to our audience and the research blog has been our main tool for communicating news to our audience. The research blog has been running since its first post back in March 2011, which makes it a strong 5 years old!

With this historic achievement of age it doesn’t  mean that there isn’t room for improvement. If you have the time it would be greatly appreciated if you could fill out thisquick survey about the research blog. This will allow us to improve the site and in turn provide a better service for you!

21FD6083B5F5C05F6562C774DBE189B9

Research Blog Survey

Here at RKEO we are always trying to improve the services and information we provide to our audience and the research blog has been our main tool for communicating news to our audience. The research blog has been running since its first post back in March 2011, which makes it 5 years old this month!

With this historic achievement of age it doesn’t  mean that there isn’t room for improvement. If you have the time it would be greatly appreciated if you could fill out this quick survey about the research blog. This will allow us to improve the site and in turn provide a better service for you!

21FD6083B5F5C05F6562C774DBE189B9

Research Blog Survey

Here at RKEO we are always trying to improve the services and information we provide to our audience and the research blog has been our main tool for communicating news to our audience. The research blog has been running since its first post back in March 2011, which makes it 5 years old this month!

With this historic achievement of age it doesn’t  mean that there isn’t room for improvement. If you have the time it would be greatly appreciated if you could fill out this quick survey about the research blog. This will allow us to improve the site and in turn provide a better service for you!

21FD6083B5F5C05F6562C774DBE189B9

The Royal Society – Pairing Scheme

Each year 30 research scientists are paired with UK parliamentarians and civil servants. They learn about each other’s work by spending time together in Westminster and the researcher’s institutions.

Those taking part gain an insight into how research findings can help inform policy making, and come away with a better understanding of how they can get involved.

See who has taken part in previous years.

How does the scheme work?

The scheme takes place annually, beginning with a ‘Week in Westminster’ in which the pairs first meet. Over the week the scientists take part in workshops, hear from invited speakers and spend two days shadowing their pair.

Read 2015’s ‘Week in Westminster’ agenda (PDF). You can see how last year’s participants spent their week in Westminster by checking out this Storify.

After the ‘Week in Westminster’, it is the turn of the parliamentarians and civil servants to get an insight into the world of research, undertaking reciprocal visits with their pairs.

The scheme is now open for applications from scientists until Wednesday 9 March.  Find out how to apply. Email public.affairs@royalsociety.org for more information.

Who is the scheme for?

Parliamentarians

  • Learn about the science behind the issues raised by your constituents and meet experts who can provide evidence on the policy issues you are dealing with
  • Visit your local universities or research institutions and meet students and researchers living in your local area
  • Find out how your local schools are encouraging students to study science and maths subjects
  • Discover how scientific research underpins the UK’s innovative industries

Find out more

Civil servants

  • Find out more about the science behind the policy issues you work on
  • Learn how to analyse research findings and discover how they can be used to inform the policy decisions you make
  • Make long-lasting relationships with scientists working in your field during the Week in Westminster and by visiting your pair’s research facility
  • Network with other civil servants working in scientific fields

Find out more

Scientists

  • Learn how parliament and government work and how you can feed in to the policy making process
  • Find out how your research can inform policy decisions
  • Build lasting relationships with parliamentarians and civil servants
  • Network with fellow scientists

Find out more

14:Live – Upwardly mobile: Why stair climbing helps us stay active

Hello !

14:live will be returning on the 17th of March 14:00-14:45 in the Poole House Refectory. This is open to all staff and students and I am pleased to welcome DR James Gavin.

Regardless of age, the benefits of climbing stairs are numerous. This month’s talk will explore the impact of stair climbing on people’s physical function and cardiovascular fitness. Across the lifespan vigorous physical activity can maintain one’s health, fitness and functional mobility. However, the importance of physical function is often overlooked, and becomes essential for mobility after injury and with ageing.

Stair climbing not only benefits cardiovascular health, but also: leg strength, postural stability, balance and sensory awareness. The relevance of physical functional performance in our lives will be discussed from both athletic and clinical perspectives.

It would be great to see you all there to listen to what’s going to be a very interesting talk with James Gavin, and just to give you that little bit more incentive to come along, there will be 30 x tokens for the first 30 audience members to be exchanged for a FREE individual Papa John’s Pizza at the end of the talk, plus lots of free tea & coffee, don’t miss out! If you have any questions about this event or would like to hear about any other upcoming student engagement with research events, contact me on ocooke@bournemouth.ac.uk

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CALL FOR PAPERS: SUSTAINABLE EARTH 2016

CALL FOR PAPERS: SUSTAINABLE EARTH 2016

earth
A global forum for connecting research with action

23 and 24 June 2016, Plymouth University

Key note speakers include:

Craig Bennett – CEO, Friends of the Earth

Wendy Darke – Head of the BBC’s Natural History Unit

Sir Mark Walport – Government Chief Adviser in the United Kingdom

You are invited to participate in Sustainable Earth 2016 – a global forum for connecting research with action taking place on 23 and 24 June 2016 at Plymouth University.

Plymouth University are inviting papers from the academic community on sustainability research and also organisations interested in highlighting their sustainability related activity and where Universities can help in the future. Submit your abstract.

If you are interested in profiling your sustainability research or initiative and connecting with like-minded people then this forum is for you!

Submission Deadline: 28th February 2016

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NHS England call for 2016 Healthcare Science Award nominations

Are you and your team working on the cutting-edge science that is delivering the NHS of the future? Have you created an award winning health device or introduced a new innovation that benefits  patients and radically changes diagnosis or management?  NHS England are calling on the healthcare science community to put forward nominations for this year’s annual Healthcare Science Awards.

The awards, now in their 10th year, will be held on 29 February and 1 March as part of the annual healthcare science conference hosted by NHS Chief Scientific Officer for England, Professor Sue Hill OBE.  This year there are seven categories including:

 

  • Healthcare Scientist of the Year;
  • Healthcare science Rising Stars; (Life Sciences, Physiological, Medical Physics & Clinical Engineering, Bioinformatics) •Innovation in Scientific Services; •Improving Quality and Efficiency through Workforce Transformation; •STEM Engagement; •Healthcare Science Provider Organisation; and •Healthcare Science Patient and Public Participation.

 

Winners last year included Angela Douglas from Liverpool Women’s Hospital – awarded the Healthcare Scientist of the year – for the impact she has made on NHS Genetics over 35 years at a local, national and profession-wide basis; Professor Art Tucker – celebrated in the Service Innovation category for novel medical devices including one for DVT prevention.

The annual schools science conference and website created by the Science4U organising committee at Great Ormond Street secured the Ambassador of the Year category for the positive impact it has had on year 9-11 students, with many from less academic backgrounds. That conference now involves over 100 scientists and catered for 270 students and teachers last year.

The winners will be announced at an event in central London. Professor Sue Hill OBE, NHS Chief Scientific Officer for England, said: “The NHS Constitution makes it clear that a central principle of the health service is that it ‘operates at the limits of science.’ These awards showcase the incredible contribution healthcare scientists make to patients’ health care and it is only right to celebrate the talent and achievements of the NHS.

“We are keen to capture and highlight the world-leading science that is going on in services up and down the country and are urging people to get their nominations in by 17 February.

“These awards are a key highlight of the annual Chief Scientific Officer’s conference and nominations are invited from individuals, groups and teams of healthcare scientists from across the profession who have made an exceptional contribution.”

Details of the categories, entry forms and guidance on nomination is available on the NHS Networks website. Completed nomination forms should be returned to england.cso@nhs.net no later than 17 February.

The Health Service Journal is supporting this year’s awards.

More details of last year’s winners and finalists can be found on the NHS Networks website.

British Science Association’s Media Fellowship scheme

Applications are now open for the British Science Association’s Media Fellowship scheme.

To apply for 2016’s placements, please fill out the online application form by the 18th March at www.britishscienceassociation.org/media-fellows-applications

The Media Fellowships provide a unique opportunity for practising scientists, clinicians and engineers to spend two to six weeks working at the heart of a media outlet such as the Guardian, BBC Breakfast or the Londonist.

Every year up to ten Media Fellows are mentored by professional journalists and learn how the media operates and reports on science, how to communicate with the media and to engage the wider public with science through the media.

After their media placement Fellows attend the British Science Festival in September, which provides an opportunity to gain valuable experience working alongside a range of media organisations from all over the UK in our dedicated Press Centre. The Festival also offers opportunities to learn from a wide range of public engagement activities and network with academics, journalists and science communicators

Any queries, please e-mail mediafellows@britishscienceassociation.org

14:live – ‘Clone Wars’: The Rise of 3D Printing and 3D Scanning and its Implications for Intellectual Property Law

Hello!

14:live will be returning on the 9th of February 14:00-14:45 at Poole House Refectory, next to Papa Johns. This is open to all staff and students and I am pleased to welcome Dinusha Mendis.

3D Printing and 3D scanning allows for replication of physical objects – which in turn raises questions relating to intellectual property (IP) laws. For example, what are the implications of modifying someone else’s Computer Aided Design (CAD) file or scanning an existing object to create a new product, thereby replicating it? What IP rights of the creator would it infringe? How much ‘modification’ is needed to create a new and non-infringing product? For businesses, IP issues could arise when replacement parts are 3D printed, perhaps through a third-party supplier. These questions demonstrate that whilst the technology has significant potential for the future it raises some very important questions relating to IP law.

This talk will explore such issues whilst also considering new business models for the protection and exploitation of IP. The talk will be based on the research carried out for a Commissioned Project for the UK Government (UK Intellectual Property Office) which was led by the Speaker and published in April 2015.

It would be great to see you all there to listen to what’s going to be a very interesting talk with Dinusha, and just to give you that little bit more incentive to come along, there will be 30 x tokens for the first 30 audience members to be exchanged for a FREE individual Papa John’s Pizza at the end of the talk, plus lots of free tea & coffee, don’t miss out! If you have any questions about this event or would like to hear about any other upcoming student engagement with research events, contact me on ocooke@bournemouth.ac.uk

Research Photography Competition

The Research Photography Competition is run annually and gives academics and postgraduate research students the chance to work alongside undergraduates to tell the story of their research in an image.

Voting is nearly over for the this Competition! We have had some great entries this years competition, ranging from images of Nepal to microscopic organisms.

If you would like to have your say on who wins, then you can either vote on the research website or on Facebook.

Please feel free to come along to the awards event which be will held on the 4th of February from 2pm till 3pm, where the winners will be announced by John Fletcher. (P.S There will be free food and drink!). All entries will be kept on display in the Atrium Art Gallery from the 4th of February for two weeks

If you would like to view the entries from last years competition, you can view them here.

If you have any questions about the competition or the exhibition, please contact Oliver Cooke.

pomphMonsoon Nepal 2015 smaller version

Research Photography Competition – Voting is open !

Voting for the Research Photography Competition is now open!  Over the last few weeks, our staff and students have been using their creativity and photography skills to capture their research in a single image.  We’ve had a fantastic response and the entries submitted reflect the depth and breadth of research going on at BU.  The Care of Kin by Jill Davey to The Heart of a Fly by Paul Hartley, the photos give a glimpse into the world of research at BU.

Now we need your help to pick a winner.  You can vote either through our research website or by liking your favourite image on the Bournemouth University Facebook page.

Voting will close on 25 January, with winners announced at an event in the Atrium Art Gallery on 4th February.  All of the images will be displayed in the Gallery until Tuesday 16th February, so do drop and take a look.

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Research Photography Competition

Hello !

The entries to this year’s Research Photography Competition are still open for a short time !

Can you convey your research through an image?

We are looking for academics and postgraduates to tell the story of their research through a photograph, which can be used to inspire current BU undergraduates.

All submitted images will be showcased on the BU website late 2015, where staff and students will have the opportunity to vote for their favourite image/s. An exhibition will also be displayed in the Atrium Art Gallery during February 2016. Winners will then be announced during an Awards Ceremony which will take place on Thursday 4 February 2016.

How to enter the competition:

Step 1: Take your photo!

You can be as creative as you like in capturing the essence of your research. You could take a photo of your research in progress, showing how it is developed. Or you could focus on the people involved – the people behind the research, or the people benefitting from it. Unusual or artistic images are encouraged!

Step 2: Submit your photo

Submit your photo to the research email inbox, along with a 100–200 word description of your research by the 13th of January 2016.

Need inspiration?

Then take a look at our regular ‘Photo of the Week’, where you can read about the research behind the images or visit the Research Photography Competition 2015 webpages which highlight last year’s Research Photography Competition entries.