Posts By / dbuhalis

New Research Article: Peters, M., Kallmuenzer, A.; Buhalis, D., 2019, Host-Guest Value Co-Creation in Hospitality Family Firms,

NEW RESEARCH ARTICLE – download for FREE :

Peters, M., Kallmuenzer, A.; Buhalis, D., 2019, Host-Guest Value Co-Creation in Hospitality Family Firms,

Current Issues in Tourism, Vol.22(16) pp. 2014-2033

https://doi.org/10.1080/13683500.2018.1437122

#cocreation #value#sme #entrepreneurship #hospitality #family #marketing

The hospitality industry is dominated by small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).They are often led by entrepreneurs who face the challenge of simultaneously managing business decisions and their own wellbeing. The competitiveness of tourism destinations often depends on these entrepreneurs and therefore understanding their motivations and work patterns is critical. Research on individual wellbeing increasingly builds on the concept of quality of life (QoL). Hospitality and tourism literature so far predominantly focused on investigating QoL for tourists and residents, rather than for entrepreneurs’ QoL, even tho

Peters, M., Kallmuenzer, A.; Buhalis, D., 2019, Host-Guest Value Co-Creation in Hospitality Family Firms, Current Issues in Tourism, Vol.22(16) pp. 2014-2033 https://doi.org/10.1080/13683500.2018.1437122

ugh being key stakeholders in the hospitality industry. Therefore, this study explores the factors influencing hospitality entrepreneurs’ quality of life (“HE-QoL”) and how these relate to business growth. Results of a 380 hospitality entrepreneurs’ survey identify six distinct factors of HE-QoL. Two groups of HE-QoL are identified with significant differences in fitness level activity, entrepreneurial competencies and business growth. Findings lead to recommendations to reduce stress to improve HE-QoL, and to develop entrepreneurial competencies, which help to cope with entrepreneurial challenges. Tourism destinations and politics can support hospitality entrepreneurs in these actions by creating conditions that foster social exchange in regional communities and trust in political and economic stability.

Dr. Daisy Fan received “Best Paper of the Year 2019 for Journal of Hospitality & Tourism Research (JHTR)”

Dr. Daisy Fan received “Best Paper of the Year 2019 for Journal of Hospitality & Tourism Research (JHTR)”

Congratulations to Dr. Daisy Fan together with all the other co-authors who has received the “2019 Outstanding JHTR Best Paper of the Year” in the Awards Banquet, 26 July 2019 at the ICHRIE summer conference, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. The JHTR Editorial Review Board considered all of the papers published in 2018 and the paper entitled “Analyzing the Economic Sustainability of Tourism Development: Evidence from Hong Kong” was voted the very best of the best.

Reference:

Qiu, H., Fan, D. X. F., Lyu, J., Lin, P. M. C., & Jenkins, C. L. (2019). Analyzing the Economic Sustainability of Tourism Development: Evidence from Hong Kong. Journal of Hospitality & Tourism Research43(2), 226–248. https://doi.org/10.1177/1096348018777046

 

 

NEW PUBLICATION Fan, D., Buhalis, D., Lin, B., 2019, A tourist typology of online and face-to-face social contact: Destination immersion and tourism encapsulation/decapsulation, Annals of Tourism, Vol.78,  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.annals.2019.102757


NEW PUBLICATION Fan, D., Buhalis, D., Lin, B., 2019, A tourist typology of online and face-to-face social contact: Destination immersion and tourism encapsulation/decapsulation, Annals of Tourism Research, Vol.78,  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.annals.2019.102757

Download from https://authors.elsevier.com/a/1ZQH0aZ3ER7eS

Highlights

Information communication technology has changed tourists’ perceptions and behaviours.
Tourists use technology to connect with home while experiencing the destination.
The study adopts a qualitative approach and results are based on 51 in-depth interviews.
A six-fold tourist typology is established to portray tourist behavioural patterns.
A contact–immersion nexus is developed to indicate the tourist attachment tendencies.

Abstract

The sense of tourism encapsulation/decapsulation is increasingly determined by the level and type of connectivity enabled by advanced Information Communication Technology (ICT). This study explores tourists’ online and face-to-face social contacts and their effects on travel experiences. A six-fold tourist typology is established, namely: Disconnected Immersive Traveller, Digital Detox Traveller, Diversionary Traveller, Dual Zone Traveller, Daily Life Controller and Social Media Addict. A contact–immersion nexus is also developed to indicate the attachment tendencies of different tourist types between their home and away zones. Theoretical contributions and practical implications are discussed.

Keywords

Online social contact
Face-to-face social contact
Contact–immersion nexus
Tourism encapsulation/decapsulation





New publication: Job Satisfaction and Employee Turnover Determinants in High Contact Services: Insights from Employees’ Online Reviews,

NEW PAPER: Stamolampros, P., Korfiatis, N., Chalvatzis, K., Buhalis, D., 2019, Job Satisfaction and Employee Turnover Determinants in High Contact Services: Insights from Employees’ Online Reviews, Tourism Management,  Vol.75, Dec. pp.130-147, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tourman.2019.04.030

Abstract

We explore a special case of electronic word of mouth that of employees’ online reviews to study the determinants of job satisfaction and employee turnover. We perform our analysis using a novel dataset of 297,933 employee online reviews from 11,975 US tourism and hospitality firms, taking advantage of both the review score and text.

Leadership and cultural values are found to be better predictors of high employee satisfaction, while career progression is critical for employee turnover. One unit increase in the rating for career progression reduces the likelihood of an employee to leave a company by 14.87%.  Additionally, we quantify the effect of job satisfaction on firm profitability, where one unit increase leads to an increase between 1.2 and 1.4 in ROA. 

We do not find evidence supporting the reverse relationship, that growth on firm profitability increases job satisfaction. The feedback to management in employee reviews provides specific managerial implications.

Highlights

•We use online reviews to evaluate job satisfaction and employee turnover factors for tourism and hospitality firms.
•297,933 employee review ratings and texts for 11,975 U.S tourism and hospitality firms from Glassdoor are analyzed.
•A recent extension of probabilistic topic modeling the Structural Topic Model (STM) is used for the text analysis.
•A one unit increase of the rating for career opportunities decreases the likelihood of an employee to leave by 14.87%.
•An increase by one star in the overall rating of a company is linked with an increase between 1.2 and 1.4 of ROA.

Professor Dimitrios Buhalis at the WTO Forum: Facing the Demographic Challenge Through Tourism and Innovation

Professor Dimitrios Buhalis addressed the World Tourism Organization Forum: Facing the Demographic Challenge Through Tourism and Innovation in Segovia, Spain, 26 March 2019.

The meeting was opened by the Prime Minister of Spain, HE  Pedro Sánchez Pérez-Castejón, President of the Government of Spain and Zurab Pololikashvili, Secretary-General of the United Nations World Tourism Organization.

Professor Buhalis contributed to the Round Table focused on Tourism, Sustainability and Territorial Redistribution

Moderator: Cristina Gallach, High Commissioner for Agenda 2030 of the Government of Spain

  • Alvaro Carrillo de Albornoz, Director General of Instituto Tecnológico Hotelero
  • Damià Serrano, Director of Experience Marketing and Research at the Catalan Tourism Board
  • Elena Gil, Global Big Data Director at Telefónica and CEO at Luca
  • Violeta Matas González, Responsible for the Tourism Area of the Spanish Federation of Municipalities and Provinces

Professor Buhalis in his intervention he explained the need for the creation of digital hubs that will enable innovations in rural areas and minimise the distance from the global centres through technology. Creating innovative products and services through facilitating a bottom up approach to empower entrepreneurship and support sustainable development will enable the repopulation of rural and peripheral areas. Smartness and agility will empower the development of innovative ecosystems that can address different market segments and create resources for all stakeholders.

New article by Angela Smith, Derek Robbins & Janet E. Dickinson 2019,Defining sustainable transport in rural tourism: experiences from the New Forest

New article by Angela Smith, Derek Robbins & Janet E. Dickinson 2019,
Defining sustainable transport in rural tourism: experiences from the New Forest
Journal of Sustainable Tourism, Volume 27(2), Pages: 258-275 |
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/09669582.2017.1401633

Transport policy agendas have long sought to bring about more sustainable transport at tourism destinations. Whilst there are examples of successes, it remains unclear what inroads have been made towards creating a sustainable transport future. Policy directions have evolved over a number of years and in many tourism destination contexts, it is far from clear what a desirable transport future looks like. When translated to implementation, the aims of initiatives can be unclear and baseline measures inconsistent, making success difficult to judge. This paper analyses how sustainable travel has been implemented in practice at a destination level. The focus is rural tourism and data are derived from a specific case, the New Forest National Park, UK, where a wide range of transport initiatives have been implemented since the Park’s designation in 2005. The study adopts a social practice theory perspective. Data are derived from a visitor survey, interviews and observations. It finds there is scope to improve sustainable transport provision at destinations through understanding visitor practices, but limited scope to influence meanings associated with visitor travel and travel skills. Policy meets the needs of some visitors more than others.

Author information

Angela Smith is a PhD student with a background in transport planning. Her research uses the experiences in the New Forest National Park to analyse transport practices and relative sustainability.

Derek Robbins is a senior lecturer at Bournemouth University. Trained as a transport planner his research interests include the relationship between transport and tourism, tourism and climate change, sustainable transport policy and the cruise industry.

Janet Dickinson is a professor at Bournemouth University. Her research interests focus on tourism and climate change, the sharing economy, social representations and time.

Funding

New Forest National Park Authority.

Bournemouth University Professional development courses for tourism & hospitality 

18 March – 22 March  2019 Bournemouth University Professional development courses for tourism & hospitality https://tinyurl.com/BUProfessionalCourses

Join Bournemouth University Department of Tourism and Hospitality to learn how you can develop your potential and competitiveness through managing your staff, developing your product and service, understanding your customers and using digital marketing. You will also have access to our resources and networks to develop your competitiveness. The courses are delivered through interactive workshops and networking with leading academics and students and will support managers to develop contemporary knowledge of critical business aspects that influence their profitability and performance.

Part of our Fusion and BU2025 strategy at Bournemouth University the short courses run from 18 March – 22 March and can be booked individually or as a package at a discounted rate. Our series of half-day courses will be delivered through interactive workshops and networking with leading academics and students. They will support managers, supervisors and their teams in their operational and strategic thinking.

The courses will focus on the following cutting edge areas:

  • Digital marketing and branding
  • Finance & the economy
  • Tourism attractions and heritage
  • Conferences & events
  • Asian markets & culture
  • HR – managing & developing staff
  • Sustainable hospitality

View the full schedule of short courses and click below for more detail about each course.https://tinyurl.com/BUProfessionalCourses

 

During these courses we share and disseminate our research findings and we develop collaborations and engagement to develop the talent of the future. Please forward this message to your network and encourage them to participate

New Paper Published – Volchek, K., Liu, A., Song, H., Buhalis, D. (2018). Forecasting tourist arrivals at attractions: Search engine empowered methodologies. Tourism Economics.

New Paper Published – Volchek, K., Liu, A., Song, H., Buhalis, D. (2018). Forecasting tourist arrivals at attractions: Search engine empowered methodologies. Tourism Economics. https://doi.org/10.1177/1354816618811558

Abstract

Tourist decision to visit attractions is a complex process influenced by multiple factors of individual context. This study investigates how the accuracy of tourism demand forecasting can be

improved at the micro level. The number of visits to five London museums is forecast and the predictive powers of Naïve I, seasonal Naïve, seasonal autoregressive moving average, seasonal autoregressive moving average with explanatory variables, SARMAX-mixed frequency data sampling and artificial neural network models are compared. The empirical findings extend understanding of different types of data and forecasting algorithms to the level of specific attractions. Introducing the Google Trends index on pure time-series models enhances the forecasts of the volume of arrivals to attractions. However, none of the applied models outperforms the others in all situations. Different models’ forecasting accuracy varies for short- and long-term demand predictions. The application of higher frequency search query data allows for the generation of weekly predictions, which are essential for attraction- and destination-level planning.

Keywords: artificial intelligence, attractions, forecasting, Google Trends, search engine, tourist demand

 

New paper published Viachaslau Filimonau and Delysia A.De Coteau 2019 Food waste management in hospitality operations: A critical review,

New paper published Viachaslau Filimonau and Delysia A.De Coteau 2019 Food waste management in hospitality operations: A critical review, Tourism Management Volume 71, April 2019, Pages 234-245 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tourman.2018.10.009
Abstract

Hospitality food waste represents a significant societal challenge. It is however under-researched with most studies approaching the issue from the perspective of sustainable agriculture and environmental, rather than hospitality, management. Given the specificity of hospitality operations, this is a major shortcoming which hampers understanding of the determinants of effective mitigation. This paper provides a critical, analytical account of the literature on hospitality food waste made from the viewpoint of hospitality managers. It reviews the challenges in classifying, quantifying and characterising hospitality food waste, discusses the opportunities and obstacles to its mitigation and, drawing on good business practice examples, derives a framework for managing food waste across the different areas of hospitality operations. The framework is underpinned by such determinants of effective mitigation as: core in-house competencies; training needs; initial investment costs; and potential monetary savings. The feasibility of its broader adoption by managers across the sector is discussed.

new article published by Philipp Wassler and Ksenia Kirillova 2018, Hell is other people? An existential-phenomenological analysis of the local gaze in tourism

Philipp Wassler and Ksenia Kirillova 2018, Hell is other people? An existential-phenomenological analysis of the local gaze in tourism, Tourism Management, Volume 71, April 2019, Pages 116-126
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tourman.2018.10.005

Abstract

The “Gaze” is a complex and overarching phenomenon comprised of diverse “Gazers” and “Gazees”. This paper adopts an existential-phenomenological perspective to understand tourists’ lived experiences of being gazed upon by local people. Based on thirty experiences collected from interviews with ten participants, we show that experiencing the “Local Gaze” exposes the tourist as Sartrean “Tourist-esque”: an inauthentic experiencer of positivity, discrimination, alienation and self-consciousness. Moments of true human connections are at best ephemeral. Through an existentialist lens, the study questions the possibility of authentic host-guest relationship in tourism and argues that to maintain hopes for an authentic relationship, the concepts of “Gaze” and – perhaps even of “Tourism” – need to be transcended.

Bournemouth University Professional development courses for tourism and hospitality 18 March – 22 March  2019

Bournemouth University Professional development courses for tourism & hospitality 18 March – 22 March  2019

Department of Tourism and Hospitality Bournemouth University

Information  https://www.bournemouth.ac.uk/about/our-faculties/faculty-management/our-departments/department-tourism-hospitality/professional-development-courses

Booking https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/professional-development-courses-for-tourism-hospitality-professionals-tickets-51803261951?_eboga=1715778101.1516471310

Professional development courses for tourism & hospitality professionals

Our series of half-day courses will be delivered through interactive workshops and networking with leading academics and students. They will support managers, supervisors and their teams in their operational and strategic thinking. Our half-day courses will focus on the following areas:

  • The power of technology Professor Dimitrios Buhalis
  • Digital marketing and social media Dr Elvira Bolat
  • Managing tourism destinations, economic impacts and development Professor Adam Blake
  • Heritage interpretation at visitor attractions Dr Duncan Light
  • The greener conference Dr Julie Whitfield
  • Managing self and others Dr Lia Marinakou
  • Looking after your workforce Professor Adele Ladkin
  • Managing a multicultural workforce Dr Charalampos (Babis) Giousmpasoglou
  • Upcoming Asian and Chinese Markets – Attracting new customers Dr Philipp Wassler and Dr Daisy Fan
  • Managing hospitality food waste Dr Viachaslau Filimonau

View the full schedule of short courses and click below for more detail about each course.
Information  https://www.bournemouth.ac.uk/about/our-faculties/faculty-management/our-departments/department-tourism-hospitality/professional-development-courses

Booking https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/professional-development-courses-for-tourism-hospitality-professionals-tickets-51803261951?_eboga=1715778101.1516471310

Please feel free to forward this email to interested parties.

Our Professional development courses for tourism & hospitality professionals are primarily for our partners and help us to develop the competitiveness of the tourism and hospitality industries of the future.  Join us to learn how you can develop your potential and competitiveness through managing your staff, developing your product and service, understanding your customers and using digital marketing. You will also have access to our resources and networks to develop your competitiveness. The courses are delivered through interactive workshops and networking with leading academics and students and will support managers to develop contemporary knowledge of critical business aspects that influence their profitability and performance. We pride ourselves on the cutting edge knowledge and professional excellence we cultivate. The combination of staff expertise and enthusiasm, knowledge excellence and co-creation with industry, generate innovation and best professional practice. We have developed a suite of professional development courses for the tourism and hospitality industry to support managers in their operational and strategic thinking. They will bring you the tools and techniques to help grow your business.

ABOUT BOURNEMOUTH UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT TOURISM AND HOSPITALITY

The Department of Tourism and Hospitality, Faculty of Management, Bournemouth University is a top university in the world for the study of tourism and hospitality, ranked 8th in the world for hospitality and leisure management according to the QS University Rankings 2018 and 12th in the world for hospitality and tourism management according to the Shanghai Rankings of Academic Subjects 2018 and 3rd in the UK for hospitality, event management and tourism in the Guardian League Table 2019. We are recognised globally as a leading contributor to knowledge creation and dissemination in tourism and hospitality. A team of 29 academic staff and over 1,000 undergraduate, postgraduate and doctoral students make us one of the biggest and most prolific departments in the world. The combination of staff expertise and enthusiasm, knowledge excellence and cocreation with industry, generate innovation and best professional practice. Our approach is about creating value with everyone we work with, locally and globally, and to share the benefits with society.

Look forward to welcome you to our Professional Development courses.

Professor Dimitrios Buhalis
Head of Department Tourism and Hospitality
Bournemouth University

BU Artificial Intelligence for Tourism and Hospitality – IFITTtalk – Wednesday 28 November 2018

BU Artificial Intelligence for Tourism and Hospitality – IFITTtalk
Wednesday 28 November 2018 – 09:00-17:00 FG06, Fusion, Bournemouth University, BH12 5BB, UK
Chairs: Professor Dimitrios Buhalis and Dr Nigel Williams eTourismLab, Department of Tourism and Hospitality, Bournemouth University –
Supported by IFITT talks #BUeTourism #IFITT https://tinyurl.com/BU-IFITT-AI


The (re) emergence of Artificial Intelligence (AI) as a service automation approach leveraging low cost computing and large datasets is impacting consumer experiences and is set to revolutionize tourism experiences. The ubiquitous and prevailing use of mobile devices for communication assures that stakeholders of such ‘consumer experiences’ are required to provide rapid responses to contextual queries made at any time, including within an experience encounter or activity at a destination level. AI tools that can make sense of real-time questions posed by consumers in context can provide significant value and increase engagement as well as reducing costs to destination organizations. The use of AI by tourism organizations is still low and this workshop will explore the opportunities and challenges of engaging AI as a customer co-creation toolset for industry and economic benefits. It will conclude with a scenario development exercise to identify possible futures for AI and Tourism along with a roadmap for the next 3 years of AI/Tourism development.

Evening of 27th Social get together at 19:30 at
Revolution Bournemouth Revolution Bournemouth, 165-167 Old Christchurch Rd, Bournemouth BH1 1JU

09:00 –09:30 Arrival and networking FG06

09:30-11:00 Artificial Intelligence for Tourism and Hospitality – theoretical perspectives

© Professor Dimitrios Buhalis and Dr Nigel Williams, Bournemouth University: Artificial Intelligence for Tourism and Hospitality: From individuals to clusters
© Dr Iis Tussyadiah University of Surrey, Robotics and Artificial Intelligence
© Dr Luiz Mendes Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil, Smart Tourism developments
© Professor Vasilis Katos Bournemouth University: Tourism focused Verticals: smart cities and data-driven circular economy
© Dr Chulmo Koo, Kyung Hee University, Korea, Smart Tourism and Artificial Intelligence

11:00-11:30 Coffee and networking

11:30-13:00 Artificial Intelligence for Tourism and Hospitality – current and future best practice

© Anthony Story SiliconSouth
© Gergana Halatcheva, GHS Global Hospitality
© Lee Mallon, Rarely Impossible
© Rowena (Copestake) Revill Dorset Creative
© Nikos Maniatis The Cato Bot
© Adam Greenwood greenwoodcampbell.com
© Jack Flannigan This is Crowd
Tom Keeping Keeping Studio

13:00 -14:00 Networking Lunch

14:00-15:30 Workshops Designing the future of Artificial Intelligence in Tourism

15:30-16:00 Break and Networking

16:00-17:00 Conclusions Research and Innovation agendas for the future
Chairs: Professor Dimitrios Buhalis and Dr Nigel Williams
AI Fusion: Future research – Projects – Publications – Best Practice Excellence – Education Innovations

new paper published  Volchek, K., Liu, A., Song, H., & Buhalis, D. (2018) Forecasting tourist arrivals at attractions: Search engine empowered methodologies. 

new paper published  Volchek, K., Liu, A., Song, H., & Buhalis, D. (2018) Forecasting tourist arrivals at attractions: Search engine empowered methodologies. Tourism Economics. https://doi.org/10.1177/1354816618811558

Abstract

Tourist decision to visit attractions is a complex process influenced by multiple factors of individual context. This study investigates how the accuracy of tourism demand forecasting can be improved at the micro level. The number of visits to five London museums is forecast and the predictive powers of Naïve I, seasonal Naïve, seasonal autoregressive moving average, seasonal autoregressive moving average with explanatory variables, SARMAX-mixed frequency data sampling and artificial neural network models are compared. The empirical findings extend understanding of different types of data and forecasting algorithms to the level of specific attractions. Introducing the Google Trends index on pure time-series models enhances the forecasts of the volume of arrivals to attractions. However, none of the applied models outperforms the others in all situations. Different models’ forecasting accuracy varies for short- and long-term demand predictions. The application of higher frequency search query data allows for the generation of weekly predictions, which are essential for attraction- and destination-level planning.

Keywords: artificial intelligence, attractions, forecasting, Google Trends, search engine, tourist demand

Professor Dimitrios Buhalis will present latest research on Smart Tourism : Emerging Global Digital Ecosystem at the 12th UNWTO / PATA Forum on Tourism Trends and Outlook Guilin, China Conference  The future of Tourism : Road to 2030

Professor Dimitrios Buhalis is preparing for China to present latest research on Smart Tourism : Emerging Global Digital Ecosystem at the 12th UNWTO / PATA Forum on Tourism Trends and Outlook Guilin, China Conference : The future of Tourism : Road to 2030

25-27 October 2018. People’s Government of Guilin of China, the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) and the Pacific Asia Travel Association (PATA) http://asiapacific.unwto.org/event/12th-unwtopata-forum-tourism-trends-and-outlook

Professor Heather Hartwell research into large scale nutrition interventions to improve public health

Professor Heather Hartwell research into large scale nutrition interventions to improve public health

Good nutrition and eating well is an important part of public health and can help stave off a number of age-related illnesses. Over the last twenty years, Bournemouth University’s Professor Heather Hartwell has been carrying out research into nutrition in the context of developing large scale interventions to improve public health. Her work has taken her from prisons to hospitals to workplace canteens. When Professor Hartwell began her research career in nutrition, much of the health policy focus was on one-to-one support for people who were struggling with associated health conditions. The idea that large scale interventions might be successful was only beginning to be recognised.

“One of the first projects I was involved in at Bournemouth University was a commission from the National Audit Office, exploring nutrition in prisons,” says Professor Hartwell, “We found that while prisoners did have healthy eating options, the catering on offer tended to over-rely on processed foods – bread, sausages and pasties, for example. This meant they were eating more salt than the general population, which can lead to high blood pressure and the risk of heart disease. Among other things, we recommended that they used the prison gardens to grow fresh produce, as it was a low-cost way of adding more vegetables to the food on offer. Around the same time, we were also looking at nutrition in hospital catering. In this setting, we found that there were much fewer healthy food options on offer and that meal production and delivery were overseen by a number of different teams – caterers, porters and ward staff. This meant that there was no real consistency and making it easier for miscommunication to take place.”

“It was quite eye-opening working in two very different public sector contexts,” continues Professor Hartwell, “As researchers, it’s important to go into every situation with humility because until you’re fully immersed in the context in which you’re working, you can’t fully appreciate the barriers that staff might be facing. In the NHS, for example, catering managers are often providing three meals per day, drinks and snacks on a very low budget, which limits what they’re able to do. You can’t achieve perfection in any situation, but co-created research can significantly improve what was there before.”

Working in public sector settings and seeing the difference that larger scale interventions could make on people’s health then led Professor Hartwell to consider the difference that healthier eating options could make in workplace canteen environments. “These settings are really important because they’re where people eat on a regular basis, not just one-off celebratory meals. If people are continually being offered unhealthy food choices, then it can have long-term implications for their health. We’re offered very little information about what’s in our food when we eat out, so my starting point was to improve that.”

Over the last few years, Professor Hartwell has been working on a major European grant, FoodSMART, which has been addressing exactly that issue. The grant enabled Professor Hartwell and her team to develop an App, which uses data provided by catering companies to help consumers to make more informed choices about their meals. “We wanted to create an IT solution for the contract catering industry which would both better inform their consumers and also give the companies an edge when competing for new contracts,” explains Professor Hartwell, “It was slightly ahead of its time when we first created it, but is getting much more interest now as workplaces are increasingly concerned about employee wellbeing. Nutrition can help contribute to better health, which helps to reduce sickness rates and can improve productivity too.”

Alongside FoodSMART, Professor Hartwell and her team were also leading on another European grant, which was looking at increasing our protein intake through vegetables. In the context of an increasing global population, it is important for the agricultural and catering sectors to consider more sustainable sources of food. “The project was about encouraging people to get their protein through vegetables, rather than meat, which uses far more resources than arable farming,” says Professor Hartwell, “It’s a healthier way of meeting our protein requirements as vegetables contain less fat and are much more sustainable in the long run.” Partly inspired by the issues of sustainability raised in this project, Professor Hartwell and her team have recently started working on a new research grant with partners in Brazil to consider how to improve our long term food security.

More information about VeggiEAT can be found here: https://microsites.bournemouth.ac.uk/veggieat/
More information about FoodSMART can be found here: https://microsites.bournemouth.ac.uk/foodsmart/

CALL FOR PAPERS – SPECIAL ISSUE “Brand Management and Cocreation: lessons from tourism and hospitality” 

CALL FOR PAPERS – SPECIAL ISSUE
“Brand Management and Cocreation: lessons from tourism and hospitality” JOURNAL OF PRODUCT AND BRAND MANAGEMENT – Planned publication is early 2021. http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=jpbm 

2017 Impact Factor: 2.75

GUEST EDITORS: 

Professor Dimitrios Buhalis, Bournemouth University, UK
Professor Nigel Morgan, Swansea University, UK
Dr Sangwon Park, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, China  

The planned publication early 2021
Deadline for submissions 1 September 2019
Submissions period 1 August 2019- until 1 September 2019. 

________________________________________________

CALL FOR PAPERS 

Branding originated as a means by which a company differentiated its goods and/or services compared to its competitors (Cowley, 1991). The importance of brand management in tourism and hospitality has become more important than ever as the sectors have become mature, global and highly competitive. Hitherto, the creation of strong brands was the result of passive or responsive marketing involvement by brand managers on consumers (Brown, Kozinets, and Sherry, 2003). Recent literature on marketing and brand management, however, suggests that strong brands are generated from a co-creation process, involving consumers’ active engagement (Boyle, 2007). For example, Coupland, Iacobucci, and Arnould (2005, p. 107) comment that “the consumer is an active partner with the marketer in brand-meaning formation”, whilst Brown et al. (2003, p. 30) note “the brand is a milieu where marketing management and consumer commitment co-exist”. 

Tourism and hospitality deal with experiential products and are at the forefront of cocreation (Buhalis & Foerste, 2015) so that the integration of brand management and co-creation is now a crucial issue (Buhalis and Inversini, 2014). In terms of inseparability, one of the service characteristics, the service environment implies the involvement of consumers in the entire service process – including the production and consumption stages (Middleton, Fyall, Morgan, Morgan, and Ranchhod, 2009). Moreover, the development of information technology (e.g. TripAdvisor, Booking, and Expedia) facilitates the sharing of consumer service experiences and their positive or negative reflections as part of co-creation activities, which potentially informs brand development and reputation (Binkhorst and Den Dekker, 2009; Au, Buhalis and Law, 2014). Numerous studies in tourism and hospitality have discussed the brand management and co-creation, separately. However, academic attempts to integrate two important themes are more limited. Therefore, the purpose of this special issue in JPBM is to explore brand management and co-creation in tourism and hospitality contexts using a variety of issues/concepts/examples. We invite submissions on a broad range of tourism and hospitality branding topics in this regard, and welcome both conceptual and empirical contributions. 

Some suggested tourism and hospitality branding topics include:
• Brand cocreation in tourism and hospitality
• Destination branding and cocreation
• Tourism and hospitality branding
• Tourism and hospitality Branding across cultures
• Branding through tourism ecosystems
• Sustainability and tourism branding
• Destination image and destination personality
• Branding for tourism places
• Regenerating obsolete brands in tourism and hospitality
• Tourists engagement with brands
• Brand managers’ approaches to tourism and hospitality products
• Strategies for adapting innovative branding strategies to tourism and hospitality
• The impact of technology on tourism and hospitality branding 

SUBMISSION INFORMATION
Full papers submitted to this special issue are subject to the standard review procedures and rules of Journal of Product and Brand Management. 

http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=jpbm Please note that:

• Papers need to be submitted online to the Special Issue on “Brand management and cocreation: lessons from tourism and hospitality” through the ScholarOne System (http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jpbm).
• For informal enquiries you can contact the guest editors.
• Submissions will be blind-reviewed by at least two reviewers.
• Based on the reviewers’ recommendation, the guest editors and the Editors-in-Chief will decide whether the particular submission is accepted as it is, revised and re-submitted, or rejected.

Deadline for submissions 1 September 2019.The Scholar 1 site will not open for submissions until 1 August 2019.  The site will remain open for one month until 1 September 2019. Submissions to the special issue can only be made during this window and should be made by selecting the special issue from the drop down menu which will become available on 1 August 2019. The planned publication is early 2021. 

REFERENCES 

Au, N., Buhalis, D., Law, R., 2014, Online Complaining Behavior for Mainland China Hotels: The Perception of Chinese and Non-Chinese Customers”, International Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Administration, 15, pp.248-274. 

Binkhorst, E. and Den Dekker, T. (2009), “Agenda for co-creation tourism experience research”, Journal of Hospitality Marketing and Management, Vol. 18 No. 2-3, pp. 311-327.

Boyle, E. (2007). “A process model of brand cocreation: brand management and research implications.” Journal of Product and Brand Management, Vol. 16. No. 2, pp. 122-131.

Brown, S., Kozinets, R.V. and Sherry, J.F. (2003), “Teaching old brands new tricks: retro branding and the revival of brand meaning”, Journal of Marketing, Vol. 67 No. 3, pp. 19-33.

Buhalis, D., Foerste, M., 2015, SoCoMo marketing for travel and tourism: Empowering co-creation of value, Journal of destination marketing and management 4 (3), 151-161 76

Buhalis D., Inversini A. (2014) Tourism Branding, Identity, Reputation Co-creation, and Word-of-Mouth in the Age of Social Media. In: Mariani M.M., Baggio R., Buhalis D., Longhi C. (eds) Tourism Management, Marketing, and Development. Palgrave Macmillan, New York

Coupland, J.C., Iacobucci, D. and Arnould, E. (2005), “Invisible brands: an ethnography of households and the brands in their kitchen pantries”, Journal of Consumer Research., Vol. 32 No. 1, pp. 106-13.

Cowley, D. (1991), Understanding Brands by Ten People Who Do, Kogan Page, London 

Boyle, E. (2007) “A process model of brand cocreation: brand management and research implications”, Journal of Product and Brand Management, Vol. 16 No. 2, pp.122-131.

Middleton, V. T., Fyall, A., Morgan, M., Morgan, M., & Ranchhod, A. (2009). Marketing in travel and tourism. Routledge.

Professor Dimitrios Buhalis keynote on Smart Tourism and the importance of networks for destinations presentation at the European Travel Commission Workshop

Professor Dimitrios Buhalis delivered a keynote Smart Tourism and the importance of networks for destinations presentation at the European Travel Commission Workshop in Vienna.

Professor Buhalis explained how eTourism evolved in the last 30 years and explained some of his research that was published in as early as in 1993 and is still relevant (Buhalis, D., 1993, Regional Integrated Computer Information Reservation Management Systems (RICIRMS) as a strategic tool for the small and medium tourism enterprises, Tourism Management, Vol. 14(5), pp.366 378. https://doi.org/10.1016/0261-5177(93)90005-6). He then transformed ETC delegates to the future explaining how technology will shape the future of tourism by 2030.

He explained what smart tourism is and what are the benefits for tourism destinations and organisations from the emerging tourism digital ecosystem.  Latest research from key publications was also offered.

Professor Buhalis also offered the latest range of research on smart tourism as explained in a range of publications including:

Zhang, H., Gordon, S., Buhalis, D., Ding, X., 2018, Experience Value Cocreation on Destination Online Platforms, Journal of Travel Research, In print https://doi.org/10.1177/0047287517733557

Buhalis, D., Leung, R., 2018, Smart Hospitality – Interconnectivity and Interoperability towards an Ecosystem, International Journal of Hospitality Management, Vol.71, pp.41-50 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijhm.2017.11.011

Molinillo, F., Liébana-Cabanillas, F., Anaya-Sánchez, R., Buhalis, D., 2018, DMO online platforms: image and intention to visit, Tourism Management, Vol.65, pp.116-130 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S026151771730211X

Williams, N., Inversini; A., Buhalis, D., Ferdinand, N., 2017 Destination eWOM drivers and characteristics, Annals of Tourism Research Vol.64 pp.87–101 http://doi.org/10.1016/j.annals.2017.02.007

Boes, K., Buhalis, D., Inversini, A., 2016, Smart tourism destinations: ecosystems for tourism destination competitiveness”, International Journal of Tourism Cities, Vol. 2(2), pp.108–124  http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/IJTC-12-2015-0032

Williams, N., Ferdinand, N., Inversini, A., Buhalis, D., 2015, Community Crosstalk: An exploratory analysis of destination and festival eWOM on Twitter, Journal of Marketing Management Vol.31 (9-10), pp.1113-1140 http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/0267257X.2015.1035308

Neuhofer, B., Buhalis, D., Ladkin, A., 2015, Smart technologies for personalised experiences. A case from the Hospitality Industry, Electronic Markets, Volume 25(3), pp. 243-254 https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12525-015-0182-1

Xiang, Z., Tussyadiah, I.,Buhalis, D., 2015, Smart destinations: Foundations, analytics, and applications, Journal of Destination Marketing & Management, 4(3), October 2015, pp. 143-144 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2212571X15000360

Buhalis, D., and Foerste, M., 2015, SoCoMo Marketing for Travel and Tourism:  empowering co-creation of value, Journal of Destination Marketing & Management, 4(3), October 2015, pp.151–161 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2212571X15000207

Neuhofer, B., Buhalis, D., Ladkin, A., 2014, A typology of technology enhanced experiences, International Journal of Tourism Research, 16: 340–350.  https://doi.org/10.1002/jtr.1958

Mistilis, N., and Buhalis, D., Gretzel, U., 2014, ‘eDestination Marketing of the future: the perspective of an Australian Tourism Stakeholder Network ‘, Journal Travel Research, Vo.53, 1-13. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0047287514522874

 

Professor Dimitrios Buhalis at the European Travel Commission Workshop in Vienna on Smart Tourism for destinations #tourism #smart #destination #smarttourism #smarttourism #IoT #ArtificialIntelligence