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Posts By / Jacqueline Priego

The challenges and rewards of teaching qualitative analysis with software

Qualitative research is gaining momentum in social sciences, education and health, with new developments appearing every year for gathering, analysing and disseminating data. This session will focus on the teaching and learning potential of specialised programmes for the process of systematising and analysing qualitative data.

The session will cover the basic features of computer assisted qualitative data analysis software (CAQDAS) and their possible role in students’ understanding of qualitative analysis. Specifically, it will be suggested that the process of data analysis and related techniques (content, thematic, framework and discourse analysis, to name a few) should beadvanced before students engagement with CAQDAS, but that CAQDAS have the potential to enhance students’understanding of qualitative data analysis in practice. The session will outline some practice-based recommendations for engaging students when running interactive qualitative data analysis sessions in general andworkshops for CAQDAS in particular.

Aims and objectives:

  • To introduce attendees to the basic and advance features of CAQDAS
  • To discuss the challenges and rewards of teaching qualitative analysis using CAQDAS
  • To stimulate discussion around qualitative methods teaching

Save the date: Monday 24 April, 12.00-13.30. Talbot Campus.

Bookings should be made through the Intranet, with Organisational Development.

The session will be facilidated by Dr Jacqueline Priego, who has been delivering CAQDAS workshops and training postgraduate students and researchers on qualitative analysis since 2010. She is also available for queries relating to MAXQDA and QDAMiner (not supported at BU).

NVivo workshop and surgery – 23 March

As part of the Graduate School’s Research Development Programme 2016/17, Jacqueline Priego from CEL will be delivering an NVivo workshop. Details below:

Date: 23 March 2017

Time: 14.00 – 17.00

Venue: S103

Bookings via myBU *

Audience: This workshop is suitable for PGRs with some knowledge of qualitative analysis approaches.

Intended learning outcomes. By the end of this workshop you should be able to:

• Confidently identify the main elements of the NVivo interface

• Open and create new NVivo projects

• Prepare and modify documents

• Create codes and code documents

• Rearrange the coding system

• Perform simple retrieval of coded documents

• Use annotation and linking tools.

If you are already using NVivo for your research, you might like to drop in for the last half an hour of the session, when an open surgery will be held.

Jacqueline Priego has been delivering CAQDAS workshops and training postgraduate students and researchers on qualitative analysis since 2010. She is also available for queries relating to MAXQDA and QDAMiner (not supported at BU).

*Spaces are limited due to room capacity – please book through myBU to avoid disappointment.

Introduction to Education Practice: A Programme for Research Students

The next session of our ‘Introduction to Education Practice‘ course will run from the 27th to the 29th of March.

This is a research-driven, practice-based course, aimed at doctoral students who are or will be supporting teaching activities.

The course has four main aims:

  • To introduce students to theoretical and practical knowledge on adult learning, with special emphasis on the UK context.
  • To introduce students to the UKPSF and the dimensions of Areas of Activity, Core Knowledge and Professional Values that underpin teaching and supporting learning.
  • To familiarise students with BU’s services and schemes for teaching and learning, as well as with leaning technology tools.
  • To provide students with opportunities to discuss and reflect about their particular teaching goals, and to offer a collegial space where they can receive feedback on their teaching practice.

IMG_20151207_100926Topics covered in the course include:
• The student experience of learning.
• Planning student-centred learning.
• Working in large and small groups.
• Assessment for learning.
• The potential of learning technology.

On the last day we celebrate our students’ learning by engaging them in a micro-teaching task, where they receive feedback and recommendations to improve their teaching practice.

The course is supported through materials in myBU.

Taking the course as a stepping stone, an optional follow up session will be organised for those students who would like to apply for Associate Fellowship of the Higher Education Academy through the internal scheme TeachBUa great way of enhancing the doctoral studies experience in preparation for academic posts.

To see images and resources shared by previous cohorts, check out out #TeachBU on Twitter.

Course Convenor: Dr Jacqueline Priego (CEL).

To enroll please contact Organisational Development od@bournemouth.ac.uk (register earlier to avoid disappointment, as spaces are limited).

Featured image credit: Tess Watson (CC BY 2.0).

Successful HEA Reaccreditation

The Higher Education Academy (HEA) has reaccredited TeachBU and the PG Certificate in Education Practice until 2020 as routes to gaining national recognition as HEA Fellows. HEA Fellowship is an international recognition of a commitment to professionalism in teaching and learning in higher education and demonstrates that education practice is aligned with the UK Professional Standards Framework (UKPSF). To date over 75,000 individuals have become Fellows of the HEA.

The Accreditation Panel commended Bournemouth University on its commitment to the professional development and recognition of all staff that teach and support learning and the Academic Career Matrix, which further embeds the UK Professional Standards Framework within HR policies and processes.

They commented that the Centre for Excellence in Learning (CEL) is a driver of significant change and improvement across the institution and promotes research-engaged teaching which is aligned with the UKPSF.
They also felt that there is an impressive infrastructure in place to support and develop the TeachBU provision and that participants are well supported by the clear guidance provided in the handbook which explains the requirements of each descriptor very well. Processes are well defined and the templates provided support applicants to structure their application to present the evidence of practice required.

We now have over 60% of BU academic staff with either HEA Fellowship and/or a recognized teaching qualification, with the ambition of raising this to 100% by 2018. Further details about TeachBU are available online here (via the ‘Working at BU’ tag on the staff intranet), together with details about upcoming introductory sessions and submission deadlines.

Dr Sue Eccles
November 2016

NVivo workshop and surgery – 4 November

As part of the Graduate School’s Research Development Programme 2016/17, Jacqueline Priego from CEL will be delivering an NVivo workshop. Details below:

Date: 4 November 2016

Time: 9.00-11.00

Venue: S103

Bookings via myBU *

Audience: This workshop is suitable for PGRs with some knowledge of qualitative analysis approaches.

Intended learning outcomes. By the end of this workshop you should be able to:

• Confidently identify the main elements of the NVivo interface

• Open and create new NVivo projects

• Prepare and modify documents

• Create codes and code documents

• Rearrange the coding system

• Perform simple retrieval of coded documents

• Use annotation and linking tools.

If you are already using NVivo for your research, you might like to drop in for the last half an hour of the session, when an open surgery will be held.

Jacqueline Priego has been delivering CAQDAS workshops and training postgraduate students and researchers on qualitative analysis since 2010. She is also available for queries relating to MAXQDA (not supported at BU).

*Spaces are limited due to room capacity – please book through myBU to avoid disappointment.

Students Who Bounce Back Project

Credit: Gareth Williams (CC BY 2.0)

Credit: Gareth Williams(CC BY 2.0)

Are you a student carer? Do you know a BU student who has caring responsibilities?

BU student carers – those students who provide unpaid support to someone who could not manage without your help – are invited to take part in a photo-diary research project entitled ‘Students who bounce back’, led by Dr Jacqueline Priego, from BU’s Centre for Excellence in Learning.

  • The project seeks to explore the life experience of student carers at BU and the impact of caring in their learning experiences.
  • By taking part, student carers will help us to enhance the academic and pastoral support for student carers at BU in the future.
  • The Student Carer bursary was funded through a pilot scheme in 2015/2016. This research will evaluate the effectiveness of the bursary and inform whether to continue with the bursary in future years. We would like to hear from students who were and were not successful in securing the bursary, and also from those student carers who were not aware of the bursary.

For details about the project, including its reimbursement scheme (up to £50 Amazon voucher + travel expenses), please email jpriego@bournemouth.ac.uk.

A carer is defined as anyone who cares, unpaid, for a family member who, due to illness, disability, a mental health problem or an addiction, cannot cope without their support.

Featured Image Credit: Gareth Williams (CC BY 2.0)

Assessing Undergraduate Research Assistants’ Learning through Participatory Methods

This blog post reports on the progress of the CEL-Fusion Funded project Assessing Undergraduate Research AssistantsLearning through Participatory Methods (AURAL).

The Undergraduate Research Assistantship (URA) is an institutional programme run by BU’s Research and Knowledge Exchange Office (RKEO), which furnishes academics with the financial means to hire a part-time (spring cohort) or full-time (summer cohort) research assistant who works between 75 and 225 hours on the academics’ research projects. This scheme runs twice a year and this year alone attracted 95 applications from academics with the most diverse projects.

Student researchers plan their diaries' content over pizza and snacks.

Student researchers plan their diaries’ content over pizza and snacks.

Interventions that use a ‘students-as-researchers’ pedagogy, where undergraduate students are involved in research-intensive projects, are increasing in the UK (Walkington, 2015) and internationally (Healey, 2014). BU’s URA programme is an apposite case study given its arrangements of paid research placements, which position the scheme as both research-based and work-based learning. This research contributes to the burgeoning literature on students-as-researchers through its employment of a dialogical participatory research design whereby students actively self-monitor their evolving learning when working on a research project. Through the use of reflective diaries and participatory sessions, students engaged in the process of evaluating the impact of this university-wide scheme.

In this endeavour, RKEO and CEL worked closely to embed the research into the scheme. We matched a participatory planning session for those students taking part in the research with the induction for the entire cohort of URA, so that the timing would be convenient for the majority of them. In addition, the research was run in parallel with their URA placements, and the necessary adjustments were made when students continued working beyond their URA contracts.

The preliminary results of AURAL were reported during CELebrate, through a session that provided a link with other colleagues interested in fostering research-based learning and its university-wide implementation. Twelve students from the spring cohort agreed to take part in the research, but only 7 wrote at least one diary entry and 3 made it to the closing session. All students who agreed to take part are being invited for an in-depth interview, while 17 new participants have been recruited from the summer cohort.

For a flavour of the passages coded under ‘research skills’ gained by participants, see the quotes below:

I learnt how to successfully collect various forms of offline data in order to provide some background data for a study. I have also learnt that the collection process is not a scary as first thought, and confidence and professionalism is key to the collection of good data and a happy participant. The participant feel safe and confident and more willing to participate if you actually look like you know what you’re doing and happy to be doing so (Participant 3, Diary entry 5)

I understood Thematic Analysis a lot better and felt more comfortable doing it now knowing what I was doing (Participant 4, Diary entry 2)

The full results of this scheme will be ready by the end of the summer. Watch this space!

References

Healey, M. (2014). Integrating Undergraduate Research into the Curriculum: International Perspectives on Capstone and Final-year Projects. CUR Quarterly, 34(4), 26-32.
Walkington, H. (2015). Students as researchers: Supporting undergraduate research in the disciplines in higher education. York: Higher Education Academy.

Note: Earlier versions of this text were submitted as part of a number of internal and external applications and presented at CELebrate. The blog post was first published at the CEL Blog, and is reposted here with permission.

Introduction to Education Practice: A Programme for Research Students

The next session of our ‘Introduction to Education Practice‘ course will run from the 24th to the 26th of February.

This is a research-driven, practice-based course, aimed at doctoral students who are or will be supporting teaching activities.

The course has three main aims:
• To introduce students to theoretical and practical knowledge on adult learning, with special emphasis on the UK context.
• To familiarise students with BU’s services and schemes for teaching and learning, as well as with leaning technology tools.
• To provide students with opportunities to discuss and reflect about their particular teaching goals, and to offer a collegial space where they can receive feedback on their teaching practice.

IMG_20151207_100926Topics covered in the course include:
• The student experience of learning.
• Planning student-centred learning.
• Working in large and small groups.
• Assessment for learning.
• The potential of learning technology.

On the last day we celebrate our students’ learning by engaging them in a micro-teaching task, where they receive feedback and recommendations to improve their teaching practice.

The course is supported through materials in myBU.

To see images and resources shared by previous cohorts, check out out #TeachBU on Twitter.

Programme organiser: Dr Jaccqueline Priego (CEL).

To book a place please contact Organisational Development od@bournemouth.ac.uk

 

This post was previously published on the BU’s Centre for Excellence in Learning (CEL) Blog and is reproduced here with permission.

CEL funding for final year co-creation projects

The Centre for Excellence in Learning (CEL) is offering funding for ten student-led projects, co-created with academics.

Taking part in a co-created project gives you the opportunity to develop news skills and confidence, learn how to apply knowledge, inform career decisions and increase your employability.

This is open to final year undergraduates and if you are interested you will need to identify a topic of relevance and an academic you would like to work with on a project that will be delivered in semester two of 2015/16. You will also need to write a brief project plan with intended outcomes (eg: publication, presentation, product). There will be £500 available per successful project.

Criteria

  • The project brings together a student and academic to work collaboratively
  • The project is delivered within 4 months
  • The project will lead to specific outputs e.g. publication, presentation, product
  • A short report on the outputs will be submitted to the programme leader on completion of the project.

Timescales

  • 23 November 2015 – Co-creation call for student led projects
  • 26 November 2015 – Co-creation workshop for students; PG30a 15.00-16.00
  • 2 December 2015 – Co-creation workshop for students; Lansdowne 12.00-13.00 R301
  • 31 December 2015 – Co-creation project bids due in
  • 6 January 2016 – Co-creation panel to meet; feedback to students within one week
  • 31 July 2016 – Brief reports from each project to be submitted

For more information and to apply please read the bidding form.