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Posts By / nstewart

First year postgraduate researchers…

First year postgraduate researchers…

PGRs and academics from BU have designed a series of bespoke, virtual workshops to provide you support as you start your PGR journey. The series of workshops are being trialled as part of a BU PhD research project. There are still spaces available in the following groups:

  • Mentoring Group (Tuesdays, 12-1pm, starting 6th October for 4 weeks).

Dr Steve Trenoweth will be offering support sessions for a group of PGRs, providing you with an extra layer of social support from an experienced academic outside of your supervisory team as you begin your research.

  • Mindfulness Group (Tuesdays, 10-11am, starting 6th October for 6 weeks).

Jason, a mindfulness trainer and PGR here at BU, has designed an introductory, guided course especially for PGRs, teaching you skills to help reduce stress and increase focus and concentration.

  • Project Planning Group (Mondays, 2-3pm, starting 28th September for 4 weeks). 

Dr Orlanda Harvey, a recent BU graduate, is running a practical and hands-on course in project planning to help you to plan and mentally prepare for the challenges of PGR study.

Please register via the following link if you would like to take part in any of the workshops and study:

https://bournemouth.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/pgr-registration

Mindfulness and project planning resources will also be available for you to access via the Brightspace PGR Peer Support unit once the workshops have started.

If you have any questions please contact Chloe Casey (ccasey@bournemouth.ac.uk).

 

Launched: Researcher Development Programme 2020-21

I am delighted to share with you all that webinars as part of the 2020-21 Researcher Development Programme for Postgraduate Researchers are now available to book.

You can read an overview of changes on the latest RDP announcement.

If you are a PGR or Supervisor and unable to access the Researcher Development Programme on Brightspace, please let us know and we will get you added.

Email: pgrskillsdevelopment@bournemouth.ac.uk.

PGR Peer Support Brightspace Unit

The PGR Peer Support area has just been launched and is now accessible for PGRs from your Brightspace homepage. The area will provide a forum to connect with others, ask questions and share advice about the PGR journey.

Within the PGR Peer Support area, under the heading of Peer-led Content, there is a series of interviews with current PGRs and graduates from BU. These video blogs will shed some light on the research milestones and common challenges.

In addition to this, there are Discussion Boards where you can ask questions or respond to others, post information about key events or calls for research participants too. There is also a Frequently Asked Questions tab, this will be populated with common questions from the discussion boards. This will create a repository of key questions with useful links to quickly solve small queries.

Please explore the area and engage with other PGRs. If you have any questions or suggestions for additional content you would find useful, please email Chloe Casey at ccasey@bournemouth.ac.uk.

Postgraduate Research Department Reps

 

 

 

A quick reminder that the application and election process for new PGR Department Reps will start later this month. If you are a PGR and would like to find out more about being a PGR Rep why not speak to your current department rep.

Details on the application and election process will be circulated later this month, in the meantime you may wish to have a read through the information flyer.

 

 

PGR Virtual Poster Showcase | Charlotte Clayton

Latest addition to the PGR Virtual Poster Showcase:

Charlotte Clayton, PhD student in the Faculty of Health & Social Science with this poster entitled:

‘Role of Midwifery continuity of CARE in reducing health inequalities.’

Click the poster below to enlarge.

The impact of living in a deprived area on a low-income, has far reaching consequences on maternal and infant health. Studies show that in England, women living in the most deprived areas have some of the poorest birth outcomes, and are 50% more likely to die due to pregnancy related complications than women in the least deprived neighbourhoods. Between 2010-2020, life expectancy fell for women living in deprived areas in England compared to women living in the least deprived areas, who have experienced increases in their life expectancies. Women from low-income backgrounds are also more likely to report negative maternity care experiences.

The Social Determinants of Health (SDH) are the conditions in which people are born, grow, work, live, and age. They are themselves influenced by wider societal forces shaping our daily lives, such as the distribution of wealth, power, and resources. The SDH are mostly responsible for health inequity – the unfair and avoidable differences in health status seen within and between different people, populations, and countries. Compared with traditional healthcare which impacts upon approximately 20% of health outcomes, the SDH are estimated to impact upon approximately 40%. Evidence shows that taking action on the SDH affecting women from the most deprived areas alongside the provision of continuity of midwifery care; where there is consistency in the midwife providing hands-on care for a woman and her baby throughout the antenatal, intrapartum, and postnatal periods, improves birth outcomes and reduces health inequalities. How midwives working in caseloading teams providing continuity of care to women with complex social needs in areas of high deprivation, address the SDH as part of their expanding public health role is currently not clear. There is also a lack of contemporary qualitative evidence about the SDH impacting upon childbearing women’s lives in England, from the perspectives of women themselves, which this research seeks to address.

This research will take place in the NHS, in a low-income setting in the South of England, and will follow a Constructivist Grounded Theory approach. Through the use of semi-structured interviews with childbearing women, and midwives working in caseloading teams, the study will generate a grounded theory to help explain how and indeed whether midwives engage with and take action on the SDH as part of their public health role. The study also seeks to better understand the SDH impacting upon women’s lives from their perspectives and what mechanisms exist within the case setting to facilitate or obstruct midwives engagement with the SDH. Examining these domains will contribute to the evidence base about the impact of continuity of midwifery care for women and babies at increased risk of health inequalities. 

Charlotte Clayton is a Clinical Doctoral student in the FHSS and a midwife at University Hospital Southampton. She is due to start data collection once the NHS are able to re-commence their non-Covid 19 research activity. She is supervised by Professor Ann Hemingway, Dr Mel Hughes and Dr Stella Rawnson. Please feel free to get in touch with Charlotte for more information at: claytonc@bournemouth.ac.uk or @femmidwife on Twitter.

 


If this research has inspired you and you’d like to explore applying for a research degree please visit the postgraduate research web pages or contact our dedicated admissions team.

PGR Virtual Poster Showcase | Ogochukwu Ann Ijezie

Taking us into July’s PGR Virtual Poster Showcase:

Ogochukwu Ann Ijezie, PhD student in the Faculty of Health & Social Sciences with this poster entitled:

‘Quality of life of adults with Down Syndrome: A systematic review.’

Click the poster below to enlarge.

Most research on people with Down Syndrome is in the context of health needs and treatment. There is a dearth of literature focusing upon their quality of life (QoL). The purpose of this review was to synthesize the evidence relating to the assessment and experience of QoL for adults living with Down syndrome and to identify measures of QoL for adults with Down syndrome. Searches were carried out in eight online scientific databases (January 1990 – August 2019) and supplemented with grey literature searches to identify relevant primary studies. This review is registered on PROSPERO (registration number – CRD42019140056). A total of 2112 studies were identified and screened against the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Twelve studies met the inclusion criteria (ten qualitative and two quantitative study designs). The poster will present the findings from this review.


If this research has inspired you and you’d like to explore applying for a research degree please visit the postgraduate research web pages or contact our dedicated admissions team.

PGR Virtual Poster Showcase | Ismail Can Kurtuk

This week in our PGR Virtual Poster Showcase:

Ismail Can Kurtuk, PhD student in the Faculty of Management with this poster entitled:

‘The butterfly effect of decisions: Enhancement of teaching-decision making in project management within UK higher education.’

Click the poster below to enlarge.

This research is investigating how to improve the teaching in UK Higher Education of decision-making related to project management. Decision-making is a core element of effective project management, but practitioners have reported that without extensive experience of real-life project management, the decision making of newly qualified professionals is inadequate. As a result, projects are delayed, resources are used ineffectively, risks are increased and opportunities are overlooked. Using an inductive approach based upon interviews and focus groups, this research study will investigate the experience of project managers to develop a better understanding of what how decision-making can be taught more effectively, and from this new perspective, a decision-making teaching framework will be developed and validated for application across UK Higher Education.

 


If this research has inspired you and you’d like to explore applying for a research degree please visit the postgraduate research web pages or contact our dedicated admissions team.

PGR Virtual Poster Showcase | Varshini Nandakumar

Center stage this week in the PGR Virtual Poster Showcase:

Varshini Nandakumar, PhD student in the Faculty of Science & Technology with this poster entitled:

‘Design of a functional electrical stimulation device adaptive to walking.’

Click the poster below to enlarge.

Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) is a neuro-rehabilitation technique commonly used to aid walking in individuals suffering from Drop Foot (DF), a condition that limits ankle dorsiflexion leading to drag the foot while walking. FES devices make use of small electrical pulses to generate functional muscle contraction, enabling dorsiflexion to overcome DF. Existing FES devices are aiding mobility significantly, but one limitation in them is the inefficacy to allow the user to walk confidently in different walking scenarios. As reported by users, this is caused due to the inability to lift their foot sufficiently to ambulate on different walking scenarios. Hence this project proposes to overcome this limitation using machine learning algorithms to develop a predictive model to identify steps, ramps, and kerbs. The output of this model will then be used to control the stimulation levels to provide sufficient stimulation to enable the user to overcome the obstacle.


If this research has inspired you and you’d like to explore applying for a research degree please visit the postgraduate research web pages or contact our dedicated admissions team.

New additions to the Research Skills Toolkit – Starring BU Academics

Research Skills Toolkit for PGRs

Postgraduate researchers have access to a suite of online modules as part of the Research Skills Toolkit developed by Epigeum.

I am please to announce we have now added an updated version of the Literature Review Programme, now named Undertaking a Literature Review and the BRAND NEW Principles of Research Methods, starring Dr Sally Reynolds and Professor Edwin van Teijlingen both of whom also deliver workshops as part of the Doctoral College Researcher Development Programme.

Postgraduate researchers can access these modules via the Researcher Development Programme unit on Brightspace following the instructions for creating an account on Epigeum. On here you will also have access to extensive modules covering:

  • Introduction to Research Skills
  • Research Methods
  • Principles of Research Methods
  • Research Ethics
  • Transferable Skills
  • Entrepreneurship in the Research Context

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to get in touch – Natalie Stewart (Research Skills & Development Officer). 

 

 

 

 

PGR Virtual Poster Showcase | Chris Williams

Still plenty to share in this PGR Virtual Poster Showcase:

Chris Williams, PhD student in the Faculty of Management with this poster entitled:

‘Accreditation of higher education in the UK: The rise of PSRBs & potential influence.’

Click the poster below to enlarge.

This poster will provide a graphical illustration and analysis of data collected as part of my PhD. The data collected identifies when Professional, Statutory and Regulatory Bodies (PSRB’s) that accredit UK undergraduate degrees began their accreditation programmes. PSRB’s were identified from data held by the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) and contacted individually to establish when they began accrediting, leading to the collation of a unique set of figures. HESA’s data is used as part of the Key Information Set (KIS) that HE institutions display on their web pages and other printed material. The information is also held by the Office for Students (OfS), the independent regulator of HE in the UK. Further, the poster identifies key events impacting the UK HE sector and provides a brief analysis of any correlation with the commencement of the accreditation schemes that responded.

 


If this research has inspired you and you’d like to explore applying for a research degree please visit the postgraduate research web pages or contact our dedicated admissions team.

[NEW] Sector Resource Guide to Online Supervision: A Guide for Research Supervisors

Guide to Online Supervision

As part of the UK Council for Graduate Education’s continued support for research supervisors during the covid-19 pandemic, they have published a Guide to Online Supervision.

The guide shares the benefits of online supervising, outlines the issues and challenges for supervisors and postgraduate researchers, and suggests strategies and practices for supervisors to consider when working with postgraduate researchers engaged in research at a distance.

Webinar: Effective Practices in Supervising Doctoral Candidates at a Distance 

In case you missed the hugely popular UKCGE webinar [56:10 mins] sharing good practices in remote supervision the recording can be found on their YouTube channel.

We hope these resources prove helpful to you.

PGR Virtual Poster Showcase | Hina Tariq

Next up in the PGR Virtual Poster Showcase:

Hina Tariq, PhD student in the Faculty of Health & Social Sciences with this poster entitled:

‘Validation of contracture assessment screening tool.’

Click the poster below to enlarge.

Contractures are a debilitating consequence of prolonged immobility potentially leading to physical impairments, limited functional mobility, decreased independence with everyday activities, and reduced social participation. There is no standard assessment tool available to assess the risk of contracture development or progression. The Contracture Assessment Screening Tool (CAST) was developed by Dorset Health Care University NHS Foundation Trust to address this gap. This project aims to establish the 1) CAST validity and 2) CAST effectiveness in reducing contracture development and progression. Timely identification of those at risk of contracture development or progression may help facilitate contracture prevention and the associated negative sequelae.  To evaluate CAST, a mixed methods approach is being utilised including realist review and evaluation.  Merging different methodologies and a realist approach will provide a unique perspective on CAST validation and use. This project is ongoing and the poster will present the overall methodology and significance of the project.


If this research has inspired you and you’d like to explore applying for a research degree please visit the postgraduate research web pages or contact our dedicated admissions team.

Online Researcher Development Resources for PGRs

As we enter June still in lockdown, I wanted to share some of the online researcher development resources freely available to PGRs.

Virtual Workshops – many of the scheduled RDP sessions are being delivered virtually. In June we have the following virtual sessions taking place:

  • Publishing my research
  • Academic writing
  • Milestone preparation: Viva Voce examination
  • Social media for researchers.

Spaces are available, booking via the Researcher Development Programme. 

Research Skills Toolkit – an online Research Skills Toolkit covering topics such as:

  • Becoming a Researcher
  • Research Methods
  • Disseminating your Research
  • Beyond Research
  • Research Ethics

You will need to set up an account on Epigeum, steps to follow to access the toolkit can be found on the Researcher Development Programme – Online Modules.

Video Arts – Comedy based videos and e-learning covering a range of personal and professional development topics. Personal wellbeing is a topic of huge importance but it is being particularly tested during this pandemic. Video Arts have complied a Micro-Series of content from their Wellbeing Essentials, selecting particularly relevant videos and supporting them with podcasts and other extras. It contains a mixture of videos, e-learning courses, podcasts, trailers and infographics.
Tip: Use the navigation within the e-learning, Brightspace navigation  will take you to the next module. 

Plus much more – you can also access a wider range of external resources via the ‘online content‘ tab on the RDP on Brightspace.

If you have any questions please contact Natalie (Research Skills & Development Officer).

PGR Virtual Poster Showcase | Juliette Hecquet

Taking us into the sixth week of the PGR Virtual Poster Showcase:

Juliette Hecquet, PhD student in the Faculty of Management with this poster entitled:

Exploring yoga as a flow experience: A phenomenological study of contemporary communities.’

Click the poster below to enlarge.

The definition of yoga remains fluid and controversial, creating an oxymoron between the philosophical roots of yoga and physical practice. The majority of published academic research is in medicalised fields; however researchers agree yoga has vast positive outcomes with the potential to be valuable in society.  A lack of clarity exists on what the yoga experience now is, with sparse evidence of, non-medical, qualitative research.  The flow experience and the practice of yoga continue to draws parallel’s from a philosophical standpoint.   Yoga can be regarded as one of the oldest and most systematic methods of producing flow experience but has yet to be researched as one. This interpretative phenomenological research aims to explore the lived yoga experience and the potential flow experience, across contemporary yoga communities.  Videos (vlogs) and in-depth semi-structured interviews will explore the research questions; how yoga participants explain their lived yoga experience and the potential flow experience.


If this research has inspired you and you’d like to explore applying for a research degree please visit the postgraduate research web pages or contact our dedicated admissions team.

PGR Virtual Poster Showcase | Helen Slater

This weeks highlight in the PGR Virtual Poster Showcase:

Helen Slater, PhD student in the Faculty of Science & Technology with this poster from her live exhibition entitled:

‘LEAP voices in the jungle: remote monitoring of forest biodiversity.’

Click the poster below to enlarge.

A major challenge in wildlife conservation is the difficulty of collecting and maintaining robust records of abundance and distribution. Sumatra contains a diverse array of unique animal sounds, since many forest animals use acoustic signals for long range communication; these signals can tell us a great deal about wildlife populations and behaviour. A forest soundscape was recorded in secondary forest in Sumatra, Indonesia, as a tool for rapid biodiversity assessment and to begin building a database of vocal signals for long term monitoring of apes and elephants. A network of custom-built acoustic recorders were deployed, covering both protected secondary forest and smallholder plantations at the forest edge. These data are valuable for biodiversity and population monitoring, as well as hugely effective tools for conservation education. In addition to wildlife research, materials collected from this project are being incorporated into an interactive exhibition to engage young children with nature and conservation.


If this research has inspired you and you’d like to explore applying for a research degree please visit the postgraduate research web pages or contact our dedicated admissions team.