Category / Research Centres

(e-DEALTS 2) now successfully launched!

e-Learning Dementia Education and Learning Through Simulation 2 (e-DEALTS 2) now successfully launched!

In line with this Dementia Action Week, the e-Learning Dementia Education and Learning Through Simulation 2 (e-DEALTS 2) programme was launched on 16th May 2022. The launch event was well attended by members caring for those with dementia, health and care staff in contact with people with dementia, hospital and residential care management representatives, researchers and academics.

The Ageing and Dementia Research Centre at Bournemouth University were commissioned by Health Education England to develop the e-DEALTS2 toolkit. The e-DEALTS 2 programme is a simulation-based training programme designed to support trainers to deliver dementia training online to health and social care staff and volunteers who require Tier 2 training (i.e., those who have regular contact with people with dementia, clinical and non-clinical).

The underlying principle of the e-DEALTS2 training is to provide opportunities to understand the lived experience by putting attendees into the shoes of a person with dementia.

Looking forward, we are excited to evaluate the toolkit for future research development. If you would like to be contacted by the Ageing & Dementia Research Centre about the eDEALTS2 and receive any further updates, please complete the Bournemouth University form by visiting: https://forms.office.com/r/H3q5UP7TX1

The eDEALTS2 toolkit is now available on the Health Education England website. To download, please visit https://tinyurl.com/y2228tak

Institutional Learning from Funder Feedback: Strong research collaborations

When a funding call comes out that matches your own interest or experience, it is easy to get caught up in the whirl-wind of excitement in assembling a team to put together an application. One of the first things most applicants think about is their immediate colleagues, past or current, from the academic world.

Somewhere along the way in the process, non-academic participants are considered.  In many cases, approaches are made to outside organisations – sometimes through existing contacts, to join on a proposal. When these organisations are approached, they are often asked to provide a letter of support, often without much substance or specificity when it is a new relationship. Feedback from various funders has demonstrated that what is being looked for is strong, existing relationships, in particular those that provide leveraged (matched) funding or resource. Good applications have been able to demonstrate true partnerships, and not tokenism through a bland letter of support. The RDS can help review draft letters of support to ensure they appear to meet funder need.

Why non-academic partnerships and collaborations?

Research partnerships and collaborations with non-academic experts (whether they be in business, health sectors, NGOs etc.) are likely to contribute in forms that will contribute to ‘real world’ uses, from practical experience.

Who you should approach will vary but it is best to have demonstrable proof of either working together or good strategic alignment with the planned research. The level of involvement will demonstrate a good partnership. A mistake that many make is contacting a ‘big’ company just because they are ‘big’, and not because they are the most appropriate partner for the research.

Support for finding non-academic collaborations

As well as any connections through current sectoral/subject experts within existing networks, at BU, there is support from Ehren Milner (emilner@bournemouth.ac.uk), the Research Facilitator for Industrial Collaborations, and Ian Jones (ijones@bournemouth.ac.uk), the Head of External Engagement. They field queries from organisations looking for collaborations from BU and may know of an organisation that would align with your research.

One of the best methods to build a network is to make yourself, and your research known through networking events. There are a series of collaborations events and STEAMlabs that BU run to help link together academics and external organisations.  Many other organisations (e.g. the KTN) run their own networking events. You should think about building your networks years in advance, not days.  One piece of advice that has come back from external organisations is that when it comes to leveraged funding, they like to know where their resources are going; so in most cases they wish to spend time getting to know academics first. A poor approach to new connections will start off asking for support before a direct conversation has even been held.

Guidance on Leading an external research application.

The above link will lead to a guide intended to assist you through the application stage when you intend to lead on an RKE project. The details of the process may vary between funding bodies, but the basic principles are likely to be very similar.

Helpful advice, and a pro forma table, are available to assist with ensuring the integrity of any collaborative relationships. Good luck, and happy networking!

Medical Research Council – Better methods, better research

MRC are opening up a £2,000,000 fund on 6th May for improving the methods used by others in biomedical and health research.

Deadline: 15th June 2022

The full economic cost of your project can be up to £625,000. MRC and NIHR will fund 80% of the full economic cost.

This is an ongoing scheme. Application rounds open twice per year, closing in June and November

More details on the funding opportunity here.

Your local branch of the NIHR RDS (Research Design Service) is based within the BU Clinical Research Unit (BUCRU)

We can help with your application. We advise on all aspects of developing an application and can review application drafts as well as put them to a mock funding panel (run by RDS South West) known as Project Review Committee, which is a fantastic opportunity for researchers to obtain a critical review of a proposed grant application before this is sent to a funding body.

Contact us as early as possible to benefit fully from the advice

Feel free to call us on 01202 961939 or send us an email.

NIHR Grant Applications Seminar ONLINE – 31st March 2022

  

Dear colleagues

– Do you have a great idea for research in health, social care or public health?
– Are you planning to submit a grant application to NIHR?

Our popular seminar continues online and will take place on Thursday 31st March 2022 from 10.00am – 12.30pm.

The seminar provides an overview of NIHR funding opportunities and research programme remits, requirements and application processes. We will give you top tips for your application and answer specific questions with experienced RDS South West advisers.

We will also be joined by colleagues from the NIHR Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Programme. They will be talking about the HTA programme, the nature of the projects that it funds, tips for success and any upcoming changes.

We also have a limited number of 20-minute 1-to-1 appointments available after the seminar should you wish to discuss your proposed study with an RDS adviser.

Find out more and book a place.

Your local branch of the NIHR RDS (Research Design Service) is based within the BU Clinical Research Unit (BUCRU)

We can help with your application. We advise on all aspects of developing an application and can review application drafts as well as put them to a mock funding panel (run by RDS South West) known as Project Review Committee, which is a fantastic opportunity for researchers to obtain a critical review of a proposed grant application before this is sent to a funding body.

Contact us as early as possible to benefit fully from the advice

Feel free to call us on 01202 961939 or send us an email.

Talks on Science, Health, and Data Communications Winter/Spring 2022

logo - science, health, and data communications research groupThe Science, Health, and Data Communications Research Centre invites you to our Winter-Spring 2022 research series. These talks are open to the public, and encompass topics on representations of bodies in the media, managing your health data, immersive media, and community responses to suicide.

Register for events on EventBrite.

SHDC-RC is an emerging interdisciplinary, cross-faculty centre seeking to explore the ways in which specialised knowledge and information is communicated to the public, including policy-makers and front-line workers, and how mass communication (such as journalism and entertainment media) conveys and represents these areas to audiences.

 

Carina Westling: Audience Experience in Immersive Media Contexts

Date: Thursday, 17 February 2022 at 14:00 GMT
Further details and registration.

Juhan Sonin – Own Your Healthcare Experience: an Open Source Path

Date: Thursday, 3 March 2022 at 14:00 GMT
Further details and registration.

Alex Ketchum – Toolkits for Engaging in Public Scholarship

Date: Thursday, 10 March 2022 at 14:00 GMT
Further details and registration.

Ann Luce – Supporting communities to respond to suspected suicide clusters

Date: Thursday, 17 March 2022 at 14:00 GMT
Further details and registration.

Susan Oman – ‘Following the Data’ to understand well-being data

Date: Thursday, 31 March 2022 at 14:00 BST
Further details and registration.

Catalin Brylla – Destigmatising ‘non-normative’ Bodies through Media Rep

Date: Thursday, 5 May 2022 at 14:00 BST
Further details and registration.

Jennifer Rudd – From Climate Change Ignorant to Climate Change Educator

Date: Thursday, 19 May 2022 at 14:00 BST
Further details and registration.

Join the Centre for Seldom Heard Voices February Seminar

Dr Rosie Read will be talking about the ‘Carers experience of the Covid-19 pandemic’.
February 23rd 
12:00-13:00 via TEAMS
If you would like to join the seminar please email jonesc@bournemouth.ac.uk
About the Topic:

Adult social care in the UK denotes a diverse range of provisions for people over 18 with chronic illness, mental illness, physical disabilities or frailties in older age. Social care is largely coordinated by local government and since the 1990s there has been a marked growth in community-based social care services that are delivered to people in their homes. Unlike the National Health Service (NHS), social care provision is highly residual, and has always relied heavily on the cooperation of carers (family members and friends of people using social care services) in order to run smoothly.

This presentation will examine the experiences of carers during the Covid-19 pandemic 2020-21. It will draw on qualitative data from a study of waged and unwaged caring labour provided to people at home during lockdowns and social distancing in BCP and Dorset, which incorporated 14 in depth interviews with carers. It will be shown that the closure of health and welfare services left carers with significant additional caring work and obligations, yet also unable to access support networks. Carers’ experiences of confinement, abandonment and isolation will be examined alongside the challenges they confronted in navigating health and welfare systems and finding out about entitlement to help. It will be argued that these experiences are a particularly acute iteration of a more general pattern whereby the work performed by carers is taken for granted and made invisible. The presentation will conclude by reflecting on why it is that carers are so poorly supported in the contemporary UK social care system, despite being crucial to it.

 

We look forward to seeing you at the seminar

Centre for Seldom Heard Voices

 

Wessex REACH Initiative – Peer support grant

The Wessex REACH Initiative was formally launched in the summer and their first newsletter can be found here.

Wessex REACH are offering a small amount of funding to groups of researchers who wish to create a space for thinking, connecting and problem solving with their peers.  By coming together in face-to-face peer group meetings, research ideas and local problems can be discussed, common challenges and possible solutions can be shared and learn from one another. Whether you want to meet for afternoon tea away from the office a few times a year or fund a grant writing away day or any other creative solution that suits your group, they are interested in receiving your applications.

Who is eligible?
Anyone currently working in healthcare, social care or in healthcare-related research in Wessex.

How much is available?
Each group can apply for up to £500 to be used over a 1 year period.  They are aiming to fund up to 4 groups in the first round.  All applications will be reviewed by the Wessex REACH Steering Group and successful applicants notified early in 2022.

How to apply?
Send a short summary (up to 500 words) to info@wessexreach.org.uk by 10 December 2021.  This summary should include the following information, which will be used in the shortlisting process:

  • Contact details for your group or an expression of interest in being part of a group in your area
  • Your reasons for applying and how the award will help to build research capacity in your group
  • Your planned event(s)/activity
  • What your group is hoping to achieve and how it aligns with building research capacity in the Wessex region
  • What facilitation support, if any, you would like from the Wessex REACH Exec Committee (https://www.wessexreach.org.uk/meet-the-team  )
  • Requested total budget

Questions
If you would like to discuss your eligibility or plans prior to applying please contact Beth Stuart (bls1@soton.ac.uk)

RESEARCH SEMINAR: 9/11 TWENTY YEARS ON: HOW ONE DAY CHANGED THE WORLD

THE FACULTY OF MEDIA AND COMMUNICATION presents 9/11 TWENTY YEARS ON: HOW ONE DAY CHANGED THE WORLD

HYBRID EVENT8 December 2021: 2-5pm

Fusion Building F201 or Zoom: https://bournemouth-ac-uk.zoom.us/j/84914258379?pwd=ejNYVU1wWlFwdmVtcnk2cGkzWW44Zz09. 

If you are attending in person, which is of course welcomed, could I ask that you sign up via Eventbrite https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/911-twenty-years-on-how-one-day-changed-the-world-tickets-216922309467

EVENT OVERVIEW

The events of 11 September 2001 are imprinted not only on the memories of those who witnessed them, they instituted changes which remain part of the lives of many across the world. The shock of the terrorist attacks, witnessed by a global audience, may have desensitized many to the changes: within our politics, our societies, within our ways of thinking and being. Western societies have become less inclusive and more anxious, meanwhile the so-called ‘war on terror’ has destabilised not only the lives of many across the Middle East and Asia but inspired further terrorist attacks across the European continent. This workshop explores how 9/11 impacted on our societies and the psychosocial effects of this traumatic event and the ongoing traumas it unleashed.

The workshop will showcase the work of Emeritus Professors Barry Richards and Stephen Jukes. Richards has a long-standing involvement in developing a psychoanalytic approach to politics, which in his work post 9/11 he has applied to the study of extremisms and to the appeal of terrorist organisations. Jukes was global head of news at the international news agency Reuters at the time of 9/11; subsequently his research has explored how journalists deal with experiencing traumatic news stories and the difficult relationship between journalism and emotion. Their work will be complemented by that of Dr Billie Pivnick a clinical psychologist and psychoanalytic psychotherapist was Consulting Psychologist to Thinc Design, the exhibition design team partnered with the National September 11 Memorial Museum in New York City. In this collaborative role she worked over five years with the design team to manage the emergent, but repeatedly-collapsing trauma narrative. Her attention to enacted group dynamics rendered the event’s heightened emotions less disruptive to the storytelling endeavour

The event will be hybrid. The in-person part will be in F201 (Fusion Building, Bournemouth University Talbot Campus) with a Zoom link for Dr Pivnick as well as a virtual audience.

Event Schedule

2.00 Welcome by Professor Einar Thorsen, Executive Dean of the Faculty of Media and Communication

2.10 Introduction by Professor Darren Lilleker, Chair

2.20 Professor Stephen Jukes: How 9/11 challenged journalism’s 150-year old objectivity paradigm and ushered in an era of emotionally-driven news

3.10 Professor Barry Richards: ‘A viral mutation in the human psyche’: terrorism since 9/11.

4.00 Dr. Billie A. Pivnick: Transforming collapse: Applying clinical psychoanalysis to the relational design of the National September 11 Memorial Museum.

4.50 Closing remarks by Professor Darren Lilleker, Chair

 

Abstracts

How 9/11 challenged journalism’s 150-year old objectivity paradigm and ushered in an era of emotionally-driven news

Stephen Jukes

The attacks of Sept 11 unleashed a wave of patriotic and jingoistic news reporting across America. Deeply embedded journalistic norms of objectivity and impartiality were suspended as US media reacted with shock and dismay, falling in behind President George W. Bush’s ‘War on Terror.’ This paper argues that far from being a short-term phenomenon, Sept 11 proved to be a watershed in the practice of journalism. It ushered in an era in which the 150-year-old norm of objectivity would be subjected to its stiffest challenge to date and laid the foundations for an emotionally-driven news agenda. The paper traces the roots of today’s affective media landscape back to Sept 11 – from the immediacy of the live broadcasting of terror to the advent of graphic unfiltered social media imagery and open displays of emotion by journalists. The taboo on emotion that had held sway amongst journalists since the middle of the 19th Century was broken on Sept 11.

‘A viral mutation of the human psyche’. Terrorism since 9/11.

Barry Richards

This metaphorical phrase coined by the Nigerian writer Wole Soyinka asserts that there is something new, dramatically so, about contemporary terrorism. There is wide recognition that one of its drivers is the new force of the internet, whereby any set of ideas, however delusional and antisocial, can be put before a credulous audience across the globe. However, that does not explain the existence of that credulous audience, and the presence within it of individuals ready to kill their fellow citizens, and themselves, in the name of an ideology. Is the existence of this homicidal impulse, on the scale we now see it, also a new phenomenon? That is not a question about the human psyche as a phenomenon outside of its social context: there is no such thing. But societal changes can impact strongly on our psychological functioning, as seen in the marked shifts over time in the forms taken by mental disorder. Drawing on the psychoanalytic concept of containment, and on socio-cultural analyses of identity, this paper will offer a psycho-historical perspective on contemporary terrorism in the West.

Transforming collapse: Applying clinical psychoanalysis to the relational design of the National September 11 Memorial Museum.

Billie A. Pivnick, Ph.D.

Symbolic of what we have possessed, lost, and wish to remember, the arts can memorialize cultural experiences too telling for mere speech. Aided by art, design, and storytelling, the many millions of visitors to the National September 11 Memorial Museum are remembering together not just one or more individuals or local communities, but an entire world that no longer exists. This paper details the collaboration between exhibition designer, Tom Hennes of Thinc Design, and myself, a psychoanalytic psychologist, in the relational design of the museum. This process entailed use of parallel and intertwined perspectives on how to help visitors remember, commemorate, honor, educate, witness, and mourn in order to transform unspeakable destruction into a creative reconstruction of continuity and vitality. How a psychoanalytic consultation to a museum design team developed from applying a few theoretical principles to a more generalizable model of museum storytelling will be illustrated with narrative and pictorial accounts of key moments.

 

 

Speaker Biographies

Stephen Jukes is emeritus professor in the Faculty of Media & Communication at Bournemouth University. He worked in Europe, the Middle East and the Americas as a foreign correspondent and regional editor at the international news agency Reuters. At the time of the Sept 11 attacks, he was Reuters Global Head of News based in Washington DC. He moved into the academic world in 2005, becoming dean of faculty at Bournemouth University and subsequently professor of journalism. His research focuses on areas of objectivity and emotion in news with an emphasis on conflict journalism, affect and trauma. His latest book is entitled Journalism and Emotion and explores the impact of today’s affective media environment on the practice of journalism, the lived experience of journalists and issues of trauma, moral injury and coping mechanisms.

Billie Pivnick, Ph.D. is a psychoanalytic psychologist in private practice in NYC. She is faculty/supervisor in the William Alanson White Institute Child/Adolescent Psychotherapy Program and the New Directions Psychoanalytic Writing Program. Co-Chair of the Humanities and Psychoanalysis Committee of American Psychological Association’s Division 39, she is co-founder and co-host (with Dr Romy Reading) of the podcast Couched which features conversations between analysts and various artists, academics, and influential cultural figures. She is also co-founder (with Dr Jane Hassinger) of the Psychoanalytic Community Collaboratory, a web-based seminar and project incubator for psychoanalytically-informed projects focused on innovative interdisciplinary responses to significant community problems. Additionally, she is Consulting Psychologist to Thinc Design, partnered with the National September 11 Memorial Museum, The Museum of Science and Industry, and the Pulse Foundation and is the winner of the APA’s Division 39’s 2015 Schillinger Memorial Essay Award for her essay, “Spaces to Stand In: Applying Clinical Psychoanalysis to the Relational Design of the National September 11 Memorial Museum,” and the IPTAR’s 1992 Stanley Berger Award for the contribution to psychoanalysis made by her research.

Barry Richards is emeritus professor in the Faculty of Media & Communication at Bournemouth University. After a first degree in psychology, Barry trained and worked as a clinical psychologist in the UK National Health Service before becoming a lecturer and taking a PhD in sociology. In his first academic post at the University of East London he led the development of psychosocial studies as an interdisciplinary teaching programme and research field, while researching and writing in a number of areas including popular culture, advertising, consumer behaviour, political leadership, and the rise of ‘therapeutic’ culture. He also published on the history of psychology. After moving to Bournemouth University in 2001 he concentrated on the psychosocial study of politics, developing a psychoanalytical approach to understanding political communication and public feeling, violent extremism, and social cohesion. The focus of this approach is on the emotional dimensions of political processes, particularly on the dynamics of the ’emotional public sphere’. Since leaving employment at Bournemouth in 2020, Barry has been pursuing a number of writing projects on a range of topics, including the influence on today’s culture and politics of the societal changes of the 1960s.

Return of the Science, Health, and Data Communications Research Series

logo - science, health, and data communications research groupThe Science, Health, and Data Communications Research Group invites you to our Autumn-Winter 2021 research series. These talks are open to the public, and encompass topics on representations of women scientists in the media, health inequalities and COVID-19, how comics are used for health messages, and how politics drives decisions around health and science.

Register for events on EventBrite.

SHDC-RG is an emerging interdisciplinary, cross-faculty group seeking to explore the ways in which specialised knowledge and information is communicated to the public, including policy-makers and front-line workers, and how mass communication (such as journalism and entertainment media) conveys and represents these areas to audiences.

 

 

Covid Comics & Public Health Messaging on Instagram

Date: Wednesday, 13 October 2021, 12-1pm UK time
Speaker: Prof. Anna Feigenbaum (with Ozlem Demirkol Tonnesen, Shannon McDavitt, Jonathan Sexton, Kufre Okon, Jose Blazquez), Bournemouth University
Further details and registration.

Healthcare Workers and Online Shaming During COVID-19

Date: Wednesday, 27 October 2021, 12-1pm UK time
Speaker: Dr. Luna Dolezal, University of Exeter
Further details and registration.

Generic visuals of Covid-19 in the news: invoking banal belonging through symbolic reiteration

Date: Wednesday, 10 November 2021, 12-1pm UK time
Speaker: Prof. Helen Kennedy, University of Sheffield
Further details and registration.

TBC

Date: Wednesday, 24 November 2021, 12-1pm UK time
Speaker: Dr. Tanya Le Roux, Bournemouth University
Further details and registration.

The Making of Collective Politics through Feminist Media

Date: Wednesday, 1 December 2021, 2-3pm UK time
Speaker: Dr. Rachel Kuo, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill
Further details and registration.

Humanising Public Health & Challenging Infodemics: The potential of web-comics

Date: Wednesday, 8 December 2021, 2-4pm UK time
Speaker: Dr. Emmy Waldman (Harvard), Dr. Laura Happio-Kirk (UCL), Dr. Ernesto Priego (City University), Monique Jackson (Artist)
Further details and registration.

TBC

Date: Wednesday, 15 December 2021
Speaker: Prof. Julian McDougall, Bournemouth University
Further details and registration.

 

Join us at our first Lunchtime Seminar this October.

 

Join us at our first Lunchtime Seminar this October. Email jonesc@bournemouth.ac.uk for the online link.

Octobers Seminar – 12:00-13:00 on 27th October

Mark Berry will be presenting our first lunchtime seminar on ‘The ethics and challenges of semi-covert research with active drug dealers’

Ethnographic research with offenders has become increasingly difficult to carry out in the UK and internationally. Requirements of institutional review boards (IRB) are stringent. Research that involves fieldwork in high-risk settings is often turned down, which in effect silences the voices of vulnerable and marginalised populations within them. Furthermore, witnessing and recording crimes that are not known to the police is risky and could put the researcher in a position where they are legally obligated to give up the information. Ethnography with criminals may also require elements of covert observation in order to be successful and protect the safety of both the researcher and the researched. Covert research is especially difficult to get approved and is frowned upon for being deceptive. It can, however, benefit participants by illuminating hidden injustices, whilst leading to proposals for progressive policy change. This talk draws upon data from a 5-year semi-covert ethnography of the illicit drug trade in a city in England. It outlines the ethical and methodological challenges of conducting ethnographic research on hard-to-reach criminal groups.

Centre for Seldom heard Voices – online lunchtime seminar series 

Join us at our first Lunchtime Seminar this October. Email jonesc@bournemouth.ac.uk for the online link.

Octobers Seminar – 12:00-13:00 on 27th October

Mark Berry will be presenting our first lunchtime seminar on ‘The ethics and challenges of semi-covert research with active drug dealers’

Ethnographic research with offenders has become increasingly difficult to carry out in the UK and internationally. Requirements of institutional review boards (IRB) are stringent. Research that involves fieldwork in high-risk settings is often turned down, which in effect silences the voices of vulnerable and marginalised populations within them. Furthermore, witnessing and recording crimes that are not known to the police is risky and could put the researcher in a position where they are legally obligated to give up the information. Ethnography with criminals may also require elements of covert observation in order to be successful and protect the safety of both the researcher and the researched. Covert research is especially difficult to get approved and is frowned upon for being deceptive. It can, however, benefit participants by illuminating hidden injustices, whilst leading to proposals for progressive policy change. This talk draws upon data from a 5-year semi-covert ethnography of the illicit drug trade in a city in England. It outlines the ethical and methodological challenges of conducting ethnographic research on hard-to-reach criminal groups.