Tagged / research

UK Data Service Events: May – July

The UK Data Service provides researchers with trusted, flexible support, training and access to the UK’s largest collection of social, economic and population data. They also organise a wide range of free events. Click on the links below for more information on, and to book for, the following events:

Workshops

Understanding census microdata for research purposes using the Scotland data collection

30 May 2019, 10.00 – 13.00

Administrative Data Research Centre – Scotland

Are you interested in learning more about census microdata and how they can be used in research? Have you considered using census data but are not sure what is available? This free workshop will introduce you to the UK Data Service census microdata collection and the Scottish Longitudinal Study. Although the census microdata collection covers the UK as a whole, this workshop will have a special emphasis on the collection for Scotland.

Webinars

Webinar: Key issues in reusing data

23 May 2019, Online, 15.00 – 16.00 BST

Participants will hear about the key issues in secondary analysis as a method. The introductory session will briefly cover the pros and cons of reusing data and the importance of learning about the origins of your data. Quantitative and qualitative secondary analysis will be discussed with examples and issues of context, sampling and ethics will be raised.

Webinar: Guided walk through ReShare

6 June 2019, Online, 15.00 – 16.00 BST

Are you an ESRC grant holder, whose grant has ended and is required to submit your research data into the ReShare repository? Are you a researcher interested in depositing data into ReShare to make them available for reuse, or as evidence for a published paper? Are you just curious to explore how publishing in ReShare happens in practice? Join our interactive online webinar, where we will ‘ walk’ you through the process of submitting a data collection into the ReShare repository. We will then answer any questions you may have about ReShare and depositing your data with us.

Designing user-centred engagement strategies for online-first surveys – part of the ONS Social Survey Transformation Project

27 June 2019, Online, 15.00 – 16.00 BST

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) is transforming the way its surveys collect data. It is introducing an online mode and designing for a web-first approach to mixed-mode collection, which brings challenges and opportunities. This webinar will be presented by Natalia Stutter, a Senior Research Officer at ONS. Natalia will describe how ONS is transforming the respondent communication strategy and user journey to help tackle barriers to opening letters and achieving a good response rate in online-first and mixed mode social surveys.

Developing a user-centred, web-first approach to collecting socio-demographic and household data – part of the ONS Labour Force Survey Transformation Project

1 July 2019, Online, 15.00 – 16.00 BST

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) is transforming the way its surveys collect data. It is introducing an online mode, and designing for a web-first approach to mixed-mode collection, which brings challenges and opportunities. This webinar will be presented by Emma Dickinson, a Senior Research Officer at ONS. Emma will describe how ONS is developing a respondent-centric approach to moving survey data collection online, with a specific focus on collecting household and sociodemographic information.

User Conferences

Family Finance Surveys User Conference 2019

19 June 2019, 9.30 – 16.30
Lift, Islington, London

Organised by the UK Data Service in collaboration with the Department for Work and Pensions and the Office for National Statistics. The programme contains a mixture of papers from data producers and researchers, including presentations based on analysis of the UK family finance surveys. The conference will allow users to hear updates from the data producers on the main surveys, including the Family Resources Survey, Living Costs and Food Survey, and the Wealth and Assets Survey.

Health Studies User Conference 2019

10 July 2019
University College London

The annual Health Studies User Conference, organised by the UK Data Service in collaboration with UCL and NatCen Social Research, is a full-day conference and is free to attend. The conference will allow users to hear updates from the data producers on key UK cross-sectional health surveys and key UK longitudinal studies with health-related content.

Other events

Open data dive: Plastic use reduction

6 July 2019

Federation House, Manchester

The UK Data Service and methods@manchester are running an Open Data Dive on plastic use reduction. The data dive will bring together coders, data enthusiasts, graphic designers, project managers and pizza lovers to analyse and visualise open social and economic data about plastic use reduction.

The Challenge: Local to global: The data in plastic, from single use carrier bags to international emissions from plastic manufacture – data strategies for plastic reuse reduction.

We are delighted to be welcoming some special guests including Duncan Millard, Chief Statistician, and Head of the IEA Energy Data Centre to speak about the increasing use of oil for non-energy uses and the wealth of international data relating to plastic manufacture, usage and waste.

Setting up NHS / HSC research in the UK– upcoming changes

The UK Local Information Pack

A ‘UK Local Information Pack‘ will be introduced on the 5 June 2019 to support the set-up of NHS / HSC research in the UK.

The ‘UK Local Information Pack’ is the set of documents that NHS / HSC organisations use to formally start preparing to deliver the study. You can find more information here, including what comprises the pack. All researchers wishing to set-up their study at an NHS/HSC site from 5 June, will need to be aware of this change.

The Organisation Information Document

Researchers and research teams may be aware of a document called the ‘Statement of Activities’ – this is essentially a document that allows the sponsor to make clear to the research site, what activities will be undertaken locally. The document can also act as the agreement between the sponsor and site. Researchers setting up their study before 5 June should continue to use this document.

From 5 June the Statement of Activities will be replaced by a document called the ‘Organisation Information Document‘. For non-commercially sponsored studies, that are not clinical trials or clinical investigations, the ‘Organisation Information Document’ should be used as the agreement between sponsor and participating NHS / HSC organisation.

A new delegation log template

Another feature of the UK Local Information Pack is the inclusion of a delegation log template, which is intended to be used at participating NHS / HSC organisations. This will allow NHS/HSC organisations to locally record who will be working on the study and who is authorised to undertake study tasks.

Schedule of Events or Schedule and Events Cost Attribution Tool (SoECAT)

For non-commercially sponsored studies studies an IRAS Schedule of Events or a SoECAT will be a part of the IRAS Form submission and is used in the UK Local Information Pack as a way of providing clarity to participating NHS / HSC organisations on the cost attributions associated with a study.

Further help and guidance

Guidance on the use of the UK Local Information Pack has now been published in the Site Specific page of IRAS Help to help applicants get ready for the change.

If you are making an IRAS Form submission or planning to set up research in an NHS / HSC organisation from 5 June 2019 please read the transition guidance so that you prepare the correct materials.

If you have any queries regarding any of the information provided above, or would like some guidance with regard to implementing your research in a healthcare setting – please get in touch with BU’s Research Ethics team.

You can also take a look at the Clinical Governance blog for documents, links and training opportunities.

Article published in Physiological Reports

 

The article titled “The effects of 8 weeks of inspiratory muscle training on the balance of healthy older adults: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study” has been published by Physiological Reports.

 

It is the first research to describe the effects of inspiratory muscle training (i.e. breathing exercises that improve the strength of inspiratory muscles) on static and dynamic balance (measured with the clinical tool mini-BEST) and functional mobility (such as Timed Up and Go and 5 sit to stand tasks) with community dwellers older adults (aged 65+).

The research is part of Francesco Ferraro PhD journey. Journey guided with the supervision of Professor Alison McConnell, Dr James Gavin and Tom Wainwright

The article is now fully available as open access here

https://doi.org/10.14814/phy2.14076

Abstract

To examine the effects of 8‐week unsupervised, home‐based inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on the balance and physical performance of healthy older adults. Fifty‐nine participants (74 ± 6 years) were assigned randomly in a double‐blinded fashion to either IMT or sham‐IMT, using a pressure threshold loading device. The IMT group performed 30‐breath twice daily at ~50% of maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP). The sham‐IMT group performed 60‐breaths once daily at ~15% MIP; training was home‐based and unsupervised, with adherence self‐reported through training diaries. Respiratory outcomes were assessed pre‐ and postintervention, including forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume, peak inspiratory flow rate (PIFR), MIP, and inspiratory peak power. Balance and physical performance outcomes were measured using the shortened version of the Balance Evaluation System test (mini‐BEST), Biodex® postural stability test, timed up and go, five sit‐to‐stand, isometric “sit‐up” and Biering–Sørensen tests. Between‐group effects were examined using two‐way repeated measures ANOVA, with Bonferroni correction. After 8‐week, the IMT group demonstrated greater improvements (P ≤ 0.05) in: PIFR (IMT = 0.9 ± 0.3 L sec−1; sham‐IMT = 0.3 L sec−1); mini‐BEST (IMT = 3.7 ± 1.3; sham‐IMT = 0.5 ± 0.9) and Biering–Sørensen (IMT = 62.9 ± 6.4 sec; sham‐IMT = 24.3 ± 1.4 sec) tests. The authors concluded that twice daily unsupervised, home‐based IMT is feasible and enhances inspiratory muscle function and balance for community‐dwelling older adults.

Royal Academy of Engineering to Visit BU

Engineering matters. It underpins our daily lives, drives economic growth, plays a critical role in addressing major societal challenges and helps ensure our readiness for the future, from providing a sustainable supply of food, water and clean energy, to advancing healthcare, and keeping us safe and secure.

As the UK’s national academy for engineering and technology, the Royal Academy of Engineering brings together the most talented and successful engineers – our Fellows – to advance and promote excellence in engineering for the benefit of society.

We are excited that Research Programme Managers from the Royal Academy of Engineering will be visiting BU on Wednesday 15th May to provide an overview of:

  • Who they are
  • Their remit
  • Types of funding offered
  • Their decision-making processes
  • Time frames and planning a Royal Academy of Engineering application.

This will help our academics to learn more about the Royal Academy of Engineering, its remit and the type of funding offered, and will help them determine whether or not the Royal Academy of Engineering is an appropriate funder for their research projects.

To attend the presentation and lunch, please book here.

Please contact Alex Pekalski or Theresa McManus if you have any queries.

Paper in top 30 most cited Journal Advanced Nursing articles

BU’s Dr. Bibha Simkhada’s paper ‘Factors affecting the utilisation of antenatal care in developing countries: a systematic review of the literature’ [1] is currently the 27th most cited paper in the Journal of Advanced Nursing.  This is great achievement considering that the journal has published nearly ten thousand articles since its inception (to be precise 9,847).  The Journal of Advanced Nursing (published by Wiley) is one of the prestigious journals in the nursing field.  This extremely well-cited paper was part of Bibha’s Ph.D. study at the University of Aberdeen.  Dr. Bibha Simkhada is Lecturer in Adult Nursing in the  Department of Nursing and Clinical Sciences.  One of her co-authors also works at BU, Prof. Edwin van Teijlingen and a second co-author, Prof. Padam Simkhada from Liverpool John Moores University is Visiting Professor in the Faculty of Health & Social Sciences.  The third co-author Dr. Maureen Porter retired a few years ago.

 

 

Reference:

  1. Simkhada, B., van Teijlingen E., Porter, M., Simkhada, P. (2008) Factors affecting the utilisation of antenatal care in developing countries: a systematic review of the literature, Journal of Advanced Nursing 61(3): 244-260.

Top ten cited paper in MIDWIFERY

Looking at the SCOPUS data for 5 May 2019 on the International Day of the Midwife showed that the theoretical paper ‘Risk, Theory, Social & Medical Models: critical analysis of the concept of risk in maternity care’ [1] is in the top ten mosted quoted articles in Midwifery.  Now in its 35th year, Midwifery is an international  journal published by Elsevier.  Since its inception in 1985 it has published 2,626 papers, and our paper ”Risk, Theory, Social & Medical Models’ has now been cited by 108 papers, making it the eight most cited article.

Professor Edwin van Teijlingen

Centre for Midwifery, Maternal & Perinatal Health (CMMPH)

 

Reference:

  1. MacKenzie Bryers H., van Teijlingen, E. (2010) Risk, Theory, Social & Medical Models: critical analysis of the concept of risk in maternity care, Midwifery 26(5): 488-496.

Forthcoming RKEDF events

We have some great events coming up over the next few weeks to help support you in your research activity within the Research and Knowledge Exchange Development Framework (RKEDF).

We have also grouped the RKEDF events around your needs, so if, for example, you are an Early Career Researcher or need to know about external funding, you can click on the link to find all the RKEDF sessions that may assist you. You can also find related events by using the link on each session’s page.

April
Friday 26th April RKEDF: Framing Practice-Based Research
May
Wednesday 15th May RKEDF How to Write About Methods
Wednesday 15th May RKEDF: Royal Academy of Engineering visit
Thursday 16th May RKEDF: Research Outputs – Writing Day
Thursday 23rd May RKEDF: EndNote Desktop for Managing References and Writing for Publication
Tuesday 28th May RKEDF: Advanced Literature Search Techniques
June
Thursday 6th June RKEDF: Impact Case Study Writing Retreat
Monday 17th June RKEDF:Ethical Thinking and Decision-making in Practice
Tuesday 18th June RKEDF: Using Ceative Research Methods
Thursday 27th June RKEDF: Building Evidence for REF Impact Case Studies

You can see all the Organisational Development and RKEDF events in one place on the handy calendar of events.

Please note that all sessions are now targeted, so look closely at the event page to ensure that the event is suitable for you. In addition, RKEDF events now require the approval of your Head of Department (or other nominated approver). Please follow the instructions given on the event page and the template email for you to initiate the booking request.

If you have any queries, please get in touch!

HRA Research Transparency Strategy Group minutes available

The Health Research Authority (HRA) has formed the Research Transparency Strategy Group in response to the House of Commons Science and Technology Committee Report on clinical trials transparency.

You can read more about the first meeting of the expert group, including the minutes by clicking here

In relation to this, the HRA’s Director of Policy, Juliet Tizzard has released a blog post entitled What’s the point of research transparency? You can read the post here.

BU has access to the ClinicalTrials.gov system so get in touch if you would like access. This is a great opportunity to register your study and study results in the public domain. On ClinicalTrials.gov, it is free to do so.
Despite the name, the system may be used for other clinical research projects.

Medical Research Council ‘Career Inspirations’ podcasts

The Medical Research Council have a series of ‘career inspirations’ podcasts, released on the first Wednesday of every month, where they ask a scientist to share their career highlights, what makes them tick, and their advice for forging a career in medical research.

This month’s comes from a technology specialist, however in the last 3 months they have also released podcasts from a clinical psychologist, a nutrition scientist and a stem cell scientist.

You can find the series here, which contains a link to iTunes where you can subscribe to the podcasts on your iPhone or iPad.

Introduction to Good Clinical Practice – 15th May 2019

Are you interested in running your own research project within the NHS? Good Clinical Practice, or ‘GCP’, is a requirement for those wishing to work on clinical research projects in a healthcare setting.

GCP is the international ethical, scientific and practical standard to which all clinical research is conducted. By undertaking GCP, you’re able to demonstrate the rights, safety and wellbeing of your research participants are protected, and that the data collected are reliable.

The next GCP full day session is scheduled for Wednesday 15th May, at Bournemouth University, Lansdowne Campus (Bournemouth House) – 8:45am – 4:30pm.

The day will comprise of the following sessions:

  • Introduction to research and the GCP standards;
  • Preparing to deliver your study;
  • Identifying and recruiting participants – eligibility and informed consent;
  • Data collection and ongoing study delivery;
  • Safety reporting;
  • Study closure.

If you’re interested in booking a place, please contact Research Ethics.

Remember that support is on offer at BU if you are thinking of introducing your research ideas into the NHS – email the Research Ethics mailbox, and take a look at the Clinical Governance blog.

Setting up NHS / HSC research in the UK– upcoming changes

The UK Local Information Pack

A ‘UK Local Information Pack‘ will be introduced on the 5 June 2019 to support the set-up of NHS / HSC research in the UK.

The ‘UK Local Information Pack’ is the set of documents that NHS / HSC organisations use to formally start preparing to deliver the study. You can find more information here, including what comprises the pack. All researchers wishing to set-up their study at an NHS/HSC site from 5 June, will need to be aware of this change.

The Organisation Information Document

Researchers and research teams may be aware of a document called the ‘Statement of Activities’ – this is essentially a document that allows the sponsor to make clear to the research site, what activities will be undertaken locally. The document can also act as the agreement between the sponsor and site. Researchers setting up their study before 5 June should continue to use this document.

From 5 June the Statement of Activities will be replaced by a document called the ‘Organisation Information Document‘. For non-commercially sponsored studies, that are not clinical trials or clinical investigations, the ‘Organisation Information Document’ should be used as the agreement between sponsor and participating NHS / HSC organisation.

A new delegation log template

Another feature of the UK Local Information Pack is the inclusion of a delegation log template, which is intended to be used at participating NHS / HSC organisations. This will allow NHS/HSC organisations to locally record who will be working on the study and who is authorised to undertake study tasks.

Schedule of Events or Schedule and Events Cost Attribution Tool (SoECAT)

For non-commercially sponsored studies studies an IRAS Schedule of Events or a SoECAT will be a part of the IRAS Form submission and is used in the UK Local Information Pack as a way of providing clarity to participating NHS / HSC organisations on the cost attributions associated with a study.

Further help and guidance

Guidance on the use of the UK Local Information Pack has now been published in the Site Specific page of IRAS Help to help applicants get ready for the change.

If you are making an IRAS Form submission or planning to set up research in an NHS / HSC organisation from 5 June 2019 please read the transition guidance so that you prepare the correct materials.

If you have any queries regarding any of the information provided above, or would like some guidance with regard to implementing your research in a healthcare setting – please get in touch with BU’s Research Ethics team.

You can also take a look at the Clinical Governance blog for documents, links and training opportunities.