Tagged / social sciences

BMC blog on latest HSS paper

Dr. Rachel Arnold’s recent paper in BMC Pregnancy & Childbirth was highlighted in a blog promoted by the publisher.  The paper ‘Villains or victims? An ethnography of Afghan maternity staff and the challenge of high quality respectful care‘ reports on the everyday lives of maternal healthcare providers working in a tertiary maternity hospital in Kabul, Afghanistan (1). BMC Pregnancy & Childbirth is an Open Access journal so the paper is available free of charge to anybody in Afghanistan (and elsewhere) with an internet connection.  The aim was to understand the staff’s notions of care, their varying levels of commitment to providing care for women in childbirth, and the obstacles and dilemmas that affected standards, and thereby gain insight into their contributions to respectful maternity care, whether as ‘villains’ or as ‘victims.’

Dr. Arnold is Postdoctoral Midwifery Researcher in the Centre for Midwifery, Maternal & Perinatal Health (CMMPH).  This is the third paper from Rachel’s excellent PhD project, the previous two papers appeared in BJOG and Social Science & Medicine (2-3).

Click here for BMC Blog post:

Villains or victims? The role of maternity staff in decreasing or enhancing respectful care

Reference:

  1. Arnold, R., van Teijlingen, E., Ryan, K., Holloway, I. (2019) Villains or victims? An ethnography of Afghan maternity staff and the challenge of high quality respectful care, BMC Pregnancy & Childbirth 19 :307 https://rdcu.be/bPqlj
  2. Arnold R., van Teijlingen E, Ryan K., Holloway I. (2015) Understanding Afghan health care providers: Qualitative study of culture of care in Kabul maternity hospital, BJOG 122: 260-267.
  3. Arnold, R., van Teijlingen, E., Ryan, K., Holloway, I. (2018) Parallel worlds: an ethnography of care in an Afghan maternity hospital, Social Science & Medicine 126:33-40.

 

Funding Call: Knowledge Frontiers – International Interdisciplinary Research

The British Academy has opened Funding Call: Knowledge Frontiers – International Interdisciplinary Research 2020, funded by the UK’s Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy. The deadline for submissions and UK institutional approval is 23 October 2019 at 17.00 (UK time), awards up to £200,000 for duration of 24 months, projects must begin on 1 April 2020.

The British Academy is inviting proposals from UK-based researchers in the humanities and social sciences wishing to develop international interdisciplinary projects in collaboration with colleagues from the natural, engineering and/or medical sciences. The Academy is looking to fund applications that break new ground in the collaborations – international and interdisciplinary. The purpose of each project will be to develop new international research ideas.

The Academy encourages partnerships with researchers in low-income countries, however applications focused on any country are welcome.

Applications must demonstrate an innovative and interdisciplinary approach yielding new conceptual understandings, developing ground-breaking research and energising innovative collaborations between the humanities and social sciences on the one hand, and the natural, engineering and/or medical sciences on the other, related to one or more of the following themes:

  • Hazard and Risk
  • Cultures of Forecasting
  • Meaning of Resilience

RDS is currently working with cross-disciplinary group of BU academics to develop a proposal. If you are interested either to join the existing group or willing to lead/create a new group, please contact Research Facilitator Ainar Blaudums for further details by the middle of August.

New CMMPH publication on health promotion in post-earthquake Nepal

Today saw the publication of a new paper from an international research team from the UK, Japan and Nepal.  Our research article ‘Assessing knowledge and behavioural changes on maternal and newborn health among mothers following post-earthquake health promotion in Nepal’ has been published in the Open Access journal PLoS ONE [1]. 

The paper reminds us that natural disasters often disrupt health systems affecting the whole population, but especially vulnerable people such as pregnant women, new mothers and their babies. Despite the global progress in maternal, newborn and child health (MNCH) programmes over the years, emergency responses after a disaster are often poor. Post-disaster health promotion could play an important role in improving MNCH outcomes. However, evidence remains limited on the effect of post disaster health promotion activities in low-income countries such as Nepal.

The paper reports on an post-disaster intervention study aimed at women in Nepal following the 2015 earthquake. In total, 364 mothers were recruited in the pre-intervention group and 377 in the post-intervention group. The post-intervention group was more likely to have knowledge of at least three danger signs in pregnancy (AOR [Adjusted Odds Ratio] = 2.96, P<0.001), at least three danger signs in childbirth (AOR = 3.8, P<0.001), and at least five danger signs in newborns (AOR = 1.56, P<0.001) compared to the pre-intervention group. The mothers in the post-intervention group were also more likely to ever attend ANC (AOR = 7.18, P<0.001), attend a minimum of four ANC sessions (AOR = 5.09, P<0.001), and have institutional deliveries (AOR = 2.56, P<0.001).

Religious minority groups were less likely to have knowledge of all danger signs compared to the majority Hindu group. Mothers from poorer households were also less likely to attend four ANC sessions. Mothers with higher education were more likely to have knowledge of all the danger signs. Mothers whose husbands had achieved higher education were also more likely to have knowledge of danger signs and have institutional deliveries.  The paper concludes that the health promotion intervention helped the disaster-affected mothers in improving the knowledge and behaviours related to MNCH. However, the authors also comment that vulnerable populations need more support to benefit from such intervention.

 

Reference:

Dhital R, Silwal RC, Simkhada P, van Teijlingen E, Jimba M (2019) Assessing knowledge and behavioural changes on maternal and newborn health among mothers following post-earthquake health promotion in Nepal. PLoS ONE 14(7): e0220191. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0220191

Dr. Rachel Arnold’s first paper as BU staff

Congratulations to Dr. Rachel Arnold in the Centre for Midwifery, Maternal & Perinatal Health who had her first paper accepted since she started working at BU two months ago. Her paper ‘Villains or victims? An ethnography of Afghan maternity staff and the challenge of high quality respectful care’ is co-authored with her former PhD supervisors Professor Kath Ryan (BU Visiting Faculy), Professor Emerita Immy Holloway and CMMPH’s Professor Edwin van Teijlingen [1].  The paper is Open Access funded by Bournemouth University’s Open Access Fund which will help promote the visibility of the paper before REF 2021.

I was tempted to head this blog ‘Dr. Arnold only two months at BU and first paper published’, but I decide this would perhaps send the wrong message to other new BU staff.  Rachel completed her PhD in CMMPH and this is paper is the third publication from her thesis.  The other academic publications by Dr. Arnold on Afghanistan have been in BJOG and Social Science & Medicine [2-3].

 

References:

  1. Arnold, R., van Teijlingen, E., Ryan, K., Holloway, I. (2019) Villains or victims? An ethnography of Afghan maternity staff and the challenge of high quality respectful care ,     BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth (accepted).
  2. Arnold R., van Teijlingen E, Ryan K., Holloway I. (2015) Understanding Afghan health care providers: Qualitative study of culture of care in Kabul maternity hospital, BJOG 122: 260-267.
  3. Arnold, R., van Teijlingen, E., Ryan, K., Holloway, I. (2018) Parallel worlds: an ethnography of care in an Afghan maternity hospital, Social Science & Medicine 126:33-40.

Congratulations to PhD student Alice Ladur

FHSS PhD student Alice Ladur has been awarded a small but very competitive grant by FfWG, the Funds for Women Graduates.  FfWG is the trading name of the BFWG Charitable Foundation and the BFWG (British Federation of Women Graduates), which is affiliated to the International Federation of University Women.

Alice is based in the Centre for Midwifery, Maternal & Perinatal Health (CMMPH).  Her PhD research in Uganda is supervised by Prof. Vanora Hundley and Prof. Edwin van Teijlingen. Her thesis research has already resulted in an academic paper published in the international journal BMC Pregnancy & Childbirth, which Open Access.

New BU cross-faculty publication

This week Evidence-Based Midwifery published the latest article from the BU team working on the portrayal of midwifery and maternity in the media.  This qualitative paper ‘Changing the narrative around childbirth: whose responsibility is it?’ is co-authored by a multidisciplinary team including the disciplines of Midwifery, Sociology and Media.[1]  The lead author is Prof. Vanora Hundley in the Centre for Midwifery, Maternal & Perinatal Health (CMMPH), one of longest established centres at BU, her co-authors are Dr. Ann Luce in the Faculty of Media & Communication, Prof. Edwin van Teijlingen director of CMMPH and Sophie Edlund, who was based at BU at the time of the research but who is now at Malmö University in Sweden.

The paper addresses societal’s interest in all aspects of childbirth, which is reflected in both social and traditional media. Stories often focus on dramatic, risky and mostly unrealistic events; misrepresenting childbirth and maternity care professionals. The authors raised the question: “Whose responsibility is it to ensure accurate representations of childbirth?”   Using semi-structured in-depth interviews with ten midwives working in the UK some working in the NHS, some in Higher Education or independent practice, the authors distilled four separate but inter-related themes:

(1) not my responsibility;

(2) fear of retribution;

(3) power balance; and

(4) social media.

The themes sat within two wider societal issues that reflect the current challenges for midwifery, these were (a) the ongoing battle between the social and the medical models of childbirth and (b) the impact of gender.  Finding that midwives fear the media resonates with experiences from a number of countries and professional groups. There is a need to change media discourse in both fictional and factual representations of childbirth and midwives have a critical role to play in this, but to do this they need to equip themselves with the skills necessary to engage with the media. Guidelines on responsible media reporting could ensure that media producers portray pregnancy, midwifery and maternity care as naturally as possible.

This paper is paper of a growing body of interdisciplinary research at BU across faculties, which had already resulted in six earlier publications. [2-7]  In addition last month Dr Chapleo from the Faculty of Management submitted a grant application to the ESRC under the title ‘Rebranding childbirth: understanding the role of marketing in influencing uptake of health services’, a joint application with CMMPH staff (Profs. Hundley & van Teijlingen) and the Media School (Dr. Luce).

 

References:

  1. Hundley, V., Luce, A., van Teijlingen, E., Edlund, S. (2019) Changing the narrative around childbirth: whose responsibility is it? Evidence-based Midwifery 17(2): 47-52.
  2. Luce, A., Cash, M., Hundley, V., Cheyne, H., van Teijlingen, E., Angell, C. (2016) “Is it realistic?” the portrayal of pregnancy and childbirth in the media BMC Pregnancy & Childbirth 16: 40 http://bmcpregnancychildbirth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12884-016-0827-x
  3. van Teijlingen, E., Simkhada, P., Luce, A., Hundley, V. (2016) Media, Health & Health Promotion in Nepal, Journal of Manmohan Memorial Institute of Health Sciences 2(1): 70-75. http://www.nepjol.info/index.php/JMMIHS/article/view/15799/12744
  4. Luce, A., Hundley, V., van Teijlingen, E. (Eds.) (2017) Midwifery, Childbirth and the Media, London: Palgrave Macmillan.
  5. Hundley, V., Duff, E., Dewberry, J., Luce, A., van Teijlingen, E. (2014) Fear in childbirth: are the media responsible? MIDIRS Midwifery Digest 24(4): 444-447.
  6. Hundley, V., Luce, A., van Teijlingen, E. (2015) Do midwives need to be more media savvy? MIDIRS Midwifery Digest 25(1):5-10.
  7. van Teijlingen, E., De Vries, R., Luce, A., Hundley, V. (2017) Meer bemoeien met media (In Dutch: more engagement with media). Tijdschrift voor Verloskundigen (in Dutch: Journal for Midwives), 41 (6):28-29.

Challenging paper by Prof. Pritchard and colleagues

Congratulations to Bournemouth University’s Professor Colin Pritchard, Honorary Doctor of Science Anne Silk and their Southampton colleague Lars Hansen who recently published the paper ‘Are rises in Electro-Magnetic Field in the human environment, interacting with multiple environmental pollutions, the tripping point for increases in neurological deaths in the Western World?’  This paper in Medical Hypotheses (published by Elsevier) is a worrying analysis of the effects of (recent) technological progress on our health.  If this paper does not make you worry , at least remember one message: “No mobile phones in trouser pockets or under your pillow as you’re being bathed in 450Mhz.”

Well done!

Prof. Edwin van Teijlingen

CMMPH

 

Reference:

Pritchard, C., Silk, A., Hansen, L. (2019) Are rises in Electro-Magnetic Field in the human environment, interacting with multiple environmental pollutions, the tripping point for increases in neurological deaths in the Western World? Medical Hypotheses 127: 76-83.

 

Centre for Qualitative Research Update

CQR’s webpages have now migrated to the new Centres and Institutes pages of the Bournemouth University website.  We are in the progress of refreshing and updating the new pages, but you can still connect to the old CQR webpages, at least for the time-being. It is here that you can find links to many of the specialisations of members including

Humanising Health and Social Care

Novel and Innovative Research Methodologies;  

Performative Social Science and Arts-led Research;

Narrative and Biographic Research

CQR News

Humanisation Conference

Humanising Care, Health & Wellbeing
13-14th June 2019

The Humanisation approach is supported by working practices which encourage connection to personal experience and research approaches which privilege subjective experience and knowing. Organised and led by CQR’s Deputy Director, Caroline Ellis-Hill.

CQR Members presenting at the Conference include: Camila Devis-Rozental, Caroline Ellis-Hill, Chantel Cox, Clare Gordon, Karen Rees, Lee Ann Fenge, Liz Norton, and Sally Lee.

Publications

CQR Members, Associates, and Doctoral Students are also busy writing. Below, just a taster from a range of members’ recent wide variety of methods and subject matter, now in press or about to be. CQR members come from across FHSS departments and several other BU Faculties. CQR and CEL have particular synergies around creativity in research and education. Many faculty claim membership in both Centres!

Assoc. Member Lee-Ann Fenge:

Fenge, L., Oakley, L., Taylor, B. and Beer, S. (in press) The impact of sensitive research on the researcher: preparedness and positionality, International Journal of Qualitative Methods

Fenge, L., Melacca, D, Lee, S. and Rosenorn-Lanng, E. (in press) Older peoples’ preferences and challenges when using digital technology: a systematic review with particular reference to digital games, International Journal of Education and Ageing

Fenge, L. Cutts, W. and Seagrave, J. 2018. Understanding homelessness through poetic inquiry: looking into the shadows, Social Work and Social Sciences Review, 19 (3), 119-133

BU Visiting Prof Catherine Hennessy:

Hennessy, C.H. and Means, R. (2018). “Connectivity of Older People in Rural Areas”, Chapter 8 in A. Walker (ed.) The New Dynamics of Ageing, Bristol: Policy Press.

Member Camilla Devis-Rozental:

Devis-Rozental.C. (2018). Developing Socio-Emotional Intelligence in Higher Education Scholars. London: Palgrave Macmillan.

Member Jo Thurston:

Thurston, J., 2020. Opening a Door to a Private World: Using Auto/biographical Methodology to Explore Health Experience. SAGE Methods Cases.

Assoc. Member Carly Stewart:

Sparkes, A. C. & Stewart, C. 2019. Stories as actors causing trouble in lives: a dialogical narrative analysis of a competitive cyclist and the fall from grace of Lance Armstrong. Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health

Stewart, C., Woodward, M. and Gough, R., 2019. ‘I’ve drawn, like, someone who was the world’: drawings as embodied gestures of lived yoga experience. Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health.

CQR Director Kip Jones, Member Jo Thurston, Assoc. Member Louise Oliver

Thurston and Oliver prepare for the interview

Jones was invited by Sage Publications’ MethodSpace to write a blog article for their June/July Special Issue on Creativity. Kip transcribed his interview on biographic research conducted by CQR members, Joanna Thurston and Louise Oliver. The pair interviewed Jones, along with several other academics, for their film, “It’s not research, it’s just stories!”  The film was screened at the British Sociological Association Auto/Biography Study Group Conference in December 2018. Kip Jones discusses “Biography, Auto-biography, and Creativity” in the MethodSpace blog piece.

Assoc. Member Lorraine Brown:

Kichuk, A; Brown, L; Ladkin, A 2019 Talent pool exclusion: the hotel employee perspective International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management

Member Jenny Hall:

Crowther, A. Stephen & J. Hall (2019) Association of psychosocial–spiritual experiences around childbirth and subsequent perinatal mental health outcomes: an integrated review, Journal of Reproductive and Infant Psychology.

Assoc. Members Janet Scammell, Vanessa Heaslip, Karen Cooper

Rosser, E., Scammell, J., Heaslip, V., White, S., Phillips, J., Cooper, K., Donaldson, I., Hemingway, A., (2019). Caring values in undergraduate nurse students: a qualitative longitudinal study. Nurse Education Today.

Member Michele Board, Associate Member Vanessa Heaslip

Board, M., Pigott, L., Olive, H. and Heaslip, V., 2019. Better Together – A Day Hospital’s move towards Integrated care. International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation.

CQR Members Presenting and Video Conferencing

Kip Jones held a successful video session for the recent Social Fiction Conference at the Morgan Centre for Research into Everyday Lives at the University of Manchester. He will be conducting another session via video link with postgrad students at Nazarbayev University Graduate School of Education in Kazakhstan in a few weeks’ time. Both sessions centre around the award-winning short film, RUFUS STONE and Jones’ part in creating it.

CQR Deputy Director Caroline Ellis-Hill:

Ellis-Hill C, Lamont –Robinson C & Galvin K (2019) Sustaining wellbeing after a stroke: reflections on humanising lifeworld processes within an Arts and Health group – HeART of stroke EACS conference – Sustainable Caring for Health and Wellbeing Oct 1st -3rd 2019 Åbo Akademi University, Vaasa, Finland

Paglioni M, Ellis-Hill C, Board M and Branney, J and Valentine J (2019) Exploring the experience of older people who attend a hospital …  The British Society of Gerontology 48th Annual Conference:  University of Liverpool 10 -12 July 2019.

Doctoral student, Charlotte Clayton, has a poster accepted for presentation about her PhD research fort the University of Southampton conference, ‘Pregnancy, Maternity and the Self’ 21st June.

Assoc. Member Trevor Hearing presented:

“The Scholarly Studio: The Application of the Television Studio as a Performative Research Tool” at: Creative Practice Research in the Age of NeoLiberal Hopelessness 10-12 May 2018 University of Bedfordshire. 

CQR members Lee-Ann Fenge, Kip Jones, Vanessa Heaslip Took part in the Charity Research Showcase at Bournemouth U.

Participants discussed their research with the charity sector and a wide range of charity partners.

Ideas, Ideas, Ideas!

Following on from yet another successful year of CQR Lunchtime Seminars, it is time now for CQR members, Associate Members and Doctoral Associates, to be thinking of ideas for seminars for the next academic year. The theme for the year will be: “Methods to Our Madness!”  Informal talks followed by interactive discussions are the order of the day!

There certainly will NOT be time to explain a whole research method!  Instead, presenters are asked to informally talk about how they decided on a method for a piece of research, and perhaps how that worked out (or not!) for them.  CQR audiences are particularly interested in what we might call the application of ‘Creative Methods” in research! 

CQR members are asked to submit ideas now as it takes time to organise the calendar for these ahead of time. Please send your thoughts via email to Kip.