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Symposium on Sexual Harassment in HEIs

Wednesday 29th May 10.00am-1.30pm (includes lunch and open to all)

Create Lecture Theatre, Fusion Building. Talbot Campus

This symposium, organised by BU Women’s Academic Network, brings to the fore research to challenge sexual harassment and gender-based violence on campus. Relatively recently, key institutions within the UK are making positive moves to put in place procedures to change cultures of acceptable conduct within Higher Education e.g.,  https://news.gov.scot/news/tackling-sexual-violence-and-harassment-on-campus. Following this shift to confront sexual harassment, this symposium offers a research-informed forum to raise awareness; it extends BU 2025 values of inclusivity and responsibility to an topic that is often ignored.

The morning will consist of the following presentations:

Speakers: Eva Tutchell and John Edmonds ‘Unsafe Spaces: Ending sexual abuse in Universities’

Eva started her career as a secondary school teacher and then worked for many years as an education adviser working with all age groups on gender issues. Her book Dolls and Dungarees is recommended reading for primary school teachers. She has researched attitudes of teenage boys and published guidance for schools and colleges on disordered eating.

John was General Secretary of the GMB trade union for 17 years where he increased the representation of women throughout the union. He also served as TUC President. He is a Visiting Fellow of Kings College London and a Visiting Professor at Durham University Business School.

Eva and John have been commissioned by Emerald Publishing to write about sexual misconduct and abuse in Institutes of Higher Education.

Speaker: Professor Heather Savigny ‘Gendered reflection on the impact of the REF as ‘cultural sexism’

Heather is Professor of Gender, Media and Politics at Leicester Media School, De Montfort University

Offering a feminist and intersectional (Crenshaw, 1991) analysis using survey and interview data, this paper explores the impact of social media engagement on female academics themselves, in order to understand the ways in which women experience ‘cultural sexism’ alongside ‘symbolic violence’ in the mediated public sphere. Fundamentally, ethically, this paper asks political questions about the nature of power in a policy agenda, shored up through social media usage, which fails to acknowledge the mediated embedding of masculinized knowledge and cultural sexism, as features which can serve to silence (Beard, 2017), ‘discipline and punish’ a diversity of academic women.

Speaker: Dr Peter Hills Sexual assault and acquaintance rape

Peter is Head of the Psychology Department at Bournemouth University

Peter’s research explores a number of areas of misogyny, sexual violence, and acquaintance rape. In this theme, his work has been around exploring the public’s attitudes to misogyny (both online and offline) and acquaintance rape and ways to reduce both. The work he will present concerns an evaluation of a recent campaign that has been run at Bournemouth University aimed to raise awareness of sexual assault and acquaintance rape. In particular, Peter will explore how attitudes in the University have been modified by this campaign and use the lessons learnt to inform best practice in reducing such behaviours.

For further information contact Lorraine Brown, Jayne Caudwell and Sara Ashencean Crabtree.

Photo of the week

The photo of the week series is a weekly series featuring photos taken by our academics and students for our Research Photography Competition, which provides a snapshot of some of the incredible research undertaken across the BU community.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This week’s photo of the week, ‘Happy Place,’ is by Chloe Casey, a PGR student from the faculty of Health and Social Sciences.

This photograph represents my ‘happy place’ where I escape my all-consuming doctoral research. The PhD experience is said to be difficult, autonomous and characterised by high workloads and pressure, so it is important that postgraduate researchers are encouraged to prioritise their own well-being throughout the journey. There has been much interest in the mental health of undergraduate students but there is limited research exploring factors underpinning the mental well-being of postgraduate research students specifically. However, preliminary results suggest a high risk of stress, anxiety and burnout in this population. It is documented that the organisational stressors that doctoral students experience can impact academic performance and attrition, but these require further exploration. Postgraduate researchers are often part of wider research teams and their output provides scientific advancement, societal and institutional benefits therefore programme attrition can pose significant personal and financial costs. Our research is concerned with exploring and understanding the promotion of well-being in doctoral students and developing methods to promote their mental health and resilience so they are best supported to thrive academically, achieve their personal goals and successfully complete their planned research.

Can VR reveal a hidden skill?

Emteq launch public research study at London Science Museum 

 

Ifigeneia Mavridou, Research Engineer at Bournemouth University’s Centre for Digital Entertainment, will conduct a live experiment with help from members of the public at the London Science Museum for the next six weeks.

Ifigeneia is currently on a three year industrial placement with Emteq – A technology company developing novel sensors to provide new insights into how we interact with the virtual world.

Emteq – a Brighton based start-up – is helping researchers to unpick the factors that influence how we respond to new experiences.  Built into a virtual reality headset, their sensors will be able to provide feedback on the user’s emotional state as they respond to different scenarios.

The research project will be conducted in collaboration with Bournemouth University and is expected to be the largest ever study with VR using physiological sensors. Visitors to the Science Museum will have an opportunity to contribute to the new field of research that may revolutionise the treatment of mental health conditions.

While exact details of the experiment are being kept under wraps, it will explore the capabilities of VR to uncover the skills, capabilities and competencies of users as they explore virtual scenes.

Dr Charles Nduka, research lead and co-founder of Emteq, said: “Developing new treatments requires an understanding of the range of “normal’ responses to interventions, particularly for important healthcare issues such as anxiety and depression. In the past, members of the public contributed to the human genome project, which in turn has enabled many new treatments to be developed. We hope that over the next six weeks, with the help of the public, we will begin the process of understanding the range of behavioral responses that will act as a baseline for future research and treatments of mental health conditions.”

Dr Ellen Seiss Deputy Head of Research at the Department of Psychology, Bournemouth University, said: “Virtual reality offers an opportunity to have a virtual laboratory to study human behaviours. There is promising evidence that VR could be very useful to study the interaction between emotion and cognition.  This could help treatment several mental health disorders with emotional regulation deficits such as anxiety related disorders. This research will begin that process of discovery.”

 

This live event will be taking place at the London Science Museum, in the “Who Am I” exhibit, Level 1 from 8th May – 16th June.

Dr. Miguel Moital joins editorial boards of two journals

Dr. Miguel Moital, Principal Academic in the Department of Events & Leisure, was appointed to the Editorial Boards of the leading Portuguese (European Journal of Tourism, Hospitality and Recreation) and Brazilian (Revista Brasileira de Turismo (RBTUR) tourism Journals.

The European Journal of Tourism, Hospitality and Recreation (EJTHR) is an international, open access, peer-reviewed journal published by De Gruyter. EJTHR  is the official Journal of CITUR – Centre for Tourism Research, Development and Innovation, a research consortium of 17 Portuguese Polytechnic institutions to which more than 200 researchers are affiliated.

RBTUR is the official journal of the Brazilian association for research and post graduate studies in tourism (ANPTUR – Associação Nacional de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação em Turismo) and is the highest ranked Brazilian tourism journal in QUALIS, the official journal rankings in Brazil.

Pint of Science 2019

 

 

 

As a student, I attended my first Pint of Science in Cambridge in 2015. It was fun, engaging and I learnt about areas that I was curious about and got to connect with some very interesting people who were curious about science and learning. As I started my academic journey in Bournemouth as a lecturer, I was surprised that we did not have the PoS here.

In 2017, we launched the first Pint of Science festival @Bournemouth and it was hosted in 3 local pubs. Since then this has been an annual event.

Want to know more! Get you tickets here: https://pintofscience.co.uk/events/bournemouth and come along to talk about science with pint in your hand!

Hope you come along and share the Pint of Science at Bournemouth!

Shanti Shanker
My PoS Hat: City Cordinator, Pint of Science
My BU Hat: Lecturer in Psychology, Bournemouth University

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What is Pint of Science? Pint of Science is a non-profit organisation which invites science researchers (and clinical experts) to share what they do and why they do it with the public. A science festival to take excellent research findings and scientists to connect with the local community.  Speakers usually give a short talk or a presentation (about 15-30 minutes) and then the audience will have the opportunity to ask questions and have a chat with the scientists during the breaks.

When does it happen? This festival is happens over three days in May each year.

Does it happen in Bournemouth? Yes, Bournemouth has been hosting the event since 2017. This year it will be hosted in two Pubs: 1) The Four Hoursemen and 2) Chaplain’s and the Cellar Bar. The Department of Psychology has been organising this as it’s public enagement event. The Local Pubs have been brilliant in supporting us and Ojo Rojo is where we run our special rounds of PoS quizes the week the tickets are released.

Who runs the show in Bournemouth? We have a team of team of Event Managers and  Cordinators who are staff and students at Bournemouth University. The City cordinator for Bournemouth is Dr Shanti Shanker. We have some excellent run of speakers from the University each year!

Where can I buy mytickets: https://pintofscience.co.uk/events/bournemouth

How do I know when the event happens annualy? Sign up to the mailing list here: https://pintofscience.co.uk/

Why do I have to pay for the tickets? Pint of Science is a grassrootnon-profit organisation, started by a handful of friends who wanted to share interesting discoveries. Today the event is hosted in over 32 cities. Pint of Science has grown (massively) from volunteers who help the festival spread. The festival relies on the ticket money, donations, sponserorsand the universities and institutions who help PoS run annually!

 

 

 

BU papers on academic writing are getting read

Yesterday ResearchGate announced that the paper ‘Academic authorship: who, why and in what order?’ [1] has been read 1000 times.  The paper addresses two related issues in academic writing: (a) authorship; and (b) order of authors. The issue of authorship centres on the notion of who can be an author, who should be an author and who definitely should not be an author.  The paper reminds the reader that this is partly discipline specific. The second issue, the order of authors, is usually dictated by the academic tradition from which the work comes. One can immediately envisage disagreements within a multi-disciplinary team of researchers where members of the team may have different approaches to authorship order.   Prof. Vanora Hundley is the lead author and the paper is co-authored with Prof. Edwin van Teijlingen, both in the Centre for Midwifery, Maternal & Perinatal Health (CMMPH), and BU Visiting Professor Padam Simkhada.  Padam is Professor of International Public Health in the Public Health Institute at Liverpool John Moores University.

Authorship differs between disciplines

Paper by Hundley et al. published 2013

This paper is part of a larger set of papers by academic in the Faculty of Health & Social Sciences addressing various aspects of academic writing and publishing.  Many of these papers are in Open Access journals, hence easily available across the globe for anybody with an internet connection.  The series has covered papers on selecting an appropriate title for an academic paper, the role of the journal editor, the publication process and many more [2-9].

 

 

References

  1. Hundley, V, van Teijlingen, E, Simkhada, P (2013) Academic authorship: who, why and in what order? Health Renaissance 11(2):98-101 www.healthrenaissance.org.np/uploads/Download/vol-11-2/Page_99_101_Editorial.pdf
  2. Pitchforth, E, Porter M, Teijlingen van E, Keenan Forrest, K.. (2005) Writing up & presenting qualitative research in family planning & reproductive health care, J Fam Plann Reprod Health Care 31(2): 132-135.
  3. Hall, J., Hundley, V., van Teijlingen, E. (2015) The journal editor: friend or foe? Women & Birth 28(2): e26-e29.
  4. Simkhada P, van Teijlingen E, Hundley V. (2013) Writing an academic paper for publication, Health Renaissance 11(1):1-5. www.healthrenaissance.org.np/uploads/Pp_1_5_Guest_Editorial.pdf
  5. van Teijlingen, E., Ireland, J., Hundley, V., Simkhada, P., Sathian, B. (2014) Finding the right title for your article: Advice for academic authors, Nepal J Epidemiol 4(1): 344-347.
  6. van Teijlingen E., Hundley, V., Bick, D. (2014) Who should be an author on your academic paper? Midwifery 30: 385-386.
  7. van Teijlingen, E, Simkhada, PP, Rizyal A (2012) Submitting a paper to an academic peer-reviewed journal, where to start? (Guest Editorial) Health Renaissance 10(1): 1-4.
  8. van Teijlingen, E, Simkhada. PP, Simkhada, B, Ireland J. (2012) The long & winding road to publication, Nepal J Epidemiol 2(4): 213-215 http://nepjol.info/index.php/NJE/article/view/7093/6388
  9. Pradhan, AK, van Teijlingen, ER. (2017) Predatory publishing: a great concern for authors, Med Sci 5(4): 43.

Royal Academy of Engineering to Visit BU

Engineering matters. It underpins our daily lives, drives economic growth, plays a critical role in addressing major societal challenges and helps ensure our readiness for the future, from providing a sustainable supply of food, water and clean energy, to advancing healthcare, and keeping us safe and secure.

As the UK’s national academy for engineering and technology, the Royal Academy of Engineering brings together the most talented and successful engineers – our Fellows – to advance and promote excellence in engineering for the benefit of society.

We are excited that Research Programme Managers from the Royal Academy of Engineering will be visiting BU on Wednesday 15th May to provide an overview of:

  • Who they are
  • Their remit
  • Types of funding offered
  • Their decision-making processes
  • Time frames and planning a Royal Academy of Engineering application.

This will help our academics to learn more about the Royal Academy of Engineering, its remit and the type of funding offered, and will help them determine whether or not the Royal Academy of Engineering is an appropriate funder for their research projects.

To attend the presentation and lunch, please book here.

Please contact Alex Pekalski or Theresa McManus if you have any queries.

Floods and PTSD in India

Cover of NJE Yesterday the Nepal Journal of Epidemiology published its latest issue which included the paper on ‘Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder among the Flood Affected Population in Indian Subcontinent’ [1].  This Short Communication is co-authored by Prof. Edwin van Teijlingen and two members of the Visiting Faculty in our Faculty of Health & Social Sciences, namely: Prof. Padam Simkhada and Dr. Brijesh Sathian.  The Nepal Journal of Epidemiology is an Open Access journal hence this paper is freely available for anybody with internet access to read.

  Reference:

  1. Asim, M., Mekkodathil, A., Sathian, B., Elayedath, R., N, R., Simkhada, P., & van Teijlingen, E. (2019). Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder among the Flood Affected Population in Indian Subcontinent. Nepal Journal of Epidemiology, 9(1), 755-758. https://doi.org/10.3126/nje.v9i1.24003

Photo of the week

Our Photo of the Week series has returned and we’re kicking things off with Dr Anya Chapman.

The weekly series features photos taken by our academics and students for our Research Photography Competition, which provides a snapshot of some of the incredible research undertaken across the BU community.

This week’s photo of the week, ‘Pier Watch Day,’ is by Dr Anya Chapman, a senior lecturer in tourism management.

In October 2017 Blackpool’s three piers were awarded ‘Watch Status’ by international conservation organisation The World Monuments Fund. Research conducted by Anya Chapman into pier regeneration and the challenges of climate change faced by seaside piers underpinned Blackpool Council’s bid for the piers’ addition to the Watch List.

Anya was involved in the organisation of the ‘Big Pier Watch Day’ event which took place in June 2018 on Blackpool’s North Pier to raise awareness of the pier’s history and seaside heritage. The photograph was taken at the start of the day before 6000 people visited the pier to participate in guided tours, rides on the Victorian carousel, viewed the exhibition on pier development and design, and tried their luck at the traditional coconut shy.

Blackpool is the only place in the world with three seaside piers and in 2019, as part of the Watch Status, the resort will host ‘Sea Change’ an international conference on seaside heritage and climate change in conjunction with Bournemouth University.​

We are looking forward to hearing Anya present her work at tonight’s Cafe Scientifique at Cafe Boscanova in Boscombe. More information regarding the talk, ‘Pier review: what does the future hold for British seaside piers’ can be found here: https://research.bournemouth.ac.uk/cafe-scientifique/

Top ten cited paper in MIDWIFERY

Looking at the SCOPUS data for 5 May 2019 on the International Day of the Midwife showed that the theoretical paper ‘Risk, Theory, Social & Medical Models: critical analysis of the concept of risk in maternity care’ [1] is in the top ten mosted quoted articles in Midwifery.  Now in its 35th year, Midwifery is an international  journal published by Elsevier.  Since its inception in 1985 it has published 2,626 papers, and our paper ”Risk, Theory, Social & Medical Models’ has now been cited by 108 papers, making it the eight most cited article.

Professor Edwin van Teijlingen

Centre for Midwifery, Maternal & Perinatal Health (CMMPH)

 

Reference:

  1. MacKenzie Bryers H., van Teijlingen, E. (2010) Risk, Theory, Social & Medical Models: critical analysis of the concept of risk in maternity care, Midwifery 26(5): 488-496.

We’re open for business!

Exams are near; demand for support with mathematics and statistics courses (and appropriate research methods and techniques for dissertations) are all on the increase.

Visit us at the Math and Stat Clinic. No bookings required!

Kindly share with your students!

Classes and Timetables

AXA Fellowship campaign

The AXA Research Fund announced new AXA Fellowship campaign. It will remain open until May 20, 2019 at 04:00 pm (Paris, France time).

The AXA Fellowship is a funding scheme aiming at supporting young promising researchers on a priority topic aligned with AXA and the Society – ‘Towards an Improved and Better Supported Mental Health’.

The campaign is dedicated to young Post-Doctoral Fellows – candidates should be maximum PhD+ 5 years with proven scientific excellence and high potential for innovation, transformation and dissemination. Selected projects will be supported for an amount of 125.000€ over 2 years (selection rate in 2018 was 20%). More details can be found on AXA website.

Each institution is eligible to submit maximum ONE expression of interest per call. To avoid more than one expressions of interest (what will lead to disqualification), submission process will be coordinated by RDS.

If you are interested to apply, please contact your research facilitator by 6 May 2019. In case of multiple expressions of interest internal competition will be organised.

BU undergraduates showcase their research in South Wales, at the British Conference of Undergraduate Research 2019.

Following the success of SURE 2019 at BU on the 20th March, over 16 undergraduate students across all faculties were offered the support to showcase their research at BCUR 2019.

Presentation topics ranged from implications of Augmented Reality (AR) as location-based technology for a mixing tool in music production, to merits of the Peer Assisted Learning (PAL) programme on diverse backgrounds, to concepts of brand personification and shared values as antecedents of customer engagement in brand research on Jimmy’s Iced Coffee.

George Caton-Coult, an FMC student studying BA (Hons) for scriptwriting and television was one of the funded students attending and presenting at the conference and presented ‘Theorising a relationship between soundtrack and antihero engagement in Peaky Blinders.’ He said; ‘Really great 2 days, really great to come somewhere there are so many ideas and presentations s very good for presentation skills, for your future career, everything. If you are passionate about your work and have a desire to share it anyway, even if you are the kind of person that doesn’t talk a lot, it’s completely worth doing.  SURE in particular really helped me prepare for BCUR, it worked really nicely as a kind of way to build up to this.  The SURE conference was great for that.  I would advise anyone who is passionate about their work and know they’ve done good work to push the boat out and give this a try, it’s been really great’

Daisy Woodall, an Events Management student presented on Internal political efficiency as a motive for mobile millennials to attend people’s vote and The Independent’s March for the Future. She said ‘If not for anything else, it is something you should do even if it just for getting an in depth understanding of what you are researching and practicing your presentation skills, that alone is really good.  And after that, networking, meeting other people and you never know who you are going to meet and what they are going to think about your work and you might get more insights that you wouldn’t have otherwise thought about’

Matthew Dray, a Computing student from the faculty of Science and Technology presented his work on Efficient and scalable landslide monitoring via internet of things and data analytics. ‘It’s a great opportunity to hone professional skills, seeing other people and how they present their research and take that away with you, and learn and adapt from that as well.’

The involvement of BU undergraduate research at the national BCUR event along with a presence at their annual precursor event, Posters in Parliament, has been possible with key support and involvement from CEL and key contributors across all faculties.  It is an opportunity for students to engage with the research process and make real world connections to the impact of their work.  For future opportunities in these initiatives, contact Mary Beth Gouthro mgouthro@bournemouth.ac.uk or Fiona Cownie fcownie@bournemouth.ac.uk.