Tagged / PGRs

4th Annual PGR Conference – Thursday 28 June 2012

A Celebration of BU PGR Research

This annual conference is designed to showcase the best of BU’s postgraduate research and to provide a unique opportunity for PGRs to present their work within a learning environment. Our multi-disciplinary conference will allow for cross-school interaction as well as opportunities for collaboration, where appropriate.

The 2012 conference will build on the great success of the previous PGR Conferences in 2008, 2009 and 2011.

Call for Abstracts

We are inviting abstracts for oral and poster presentations from Post Graduate Research students at any stage of their research degree. Presentations may focus on:

  • Research area
  • Specific methodological approach
  • Initial findings
  • Experience of your research journey e.g. transfer

There will be prizes for the best poster and oral presentations. Please be aware that the sessions for oral presentations are fully subscribed now but we continue to welcome abstracts for poster presentations before the extended deadline (see below).

We are also looking for volunteers to help organise the conference and chair sessions. If you are interested please email the Graduate School.

How to Register

All conference attendees, including contributors, will need to complete the booking form (Conference booking form (Word doc 83 Kb)) and send via email to:graduateschool@bournemouth.ac.uk

Deadlines

For submitting abstracts for poster presentations: Thursday 7 June
For attending the conference: Monday 14 June

Further details on presentation formats and programmes from previous conferences are available here.

BU Researcher Development Programme from May to June 2012

Updated sessions for the BU Researcher Development Programme from May to June 2012 are below. Booking is essential as places are limited – details of how to book are listed under each session.

Statistics Surgeries: Individual statistics advice with Dr John Beavis

 Public Engagement Workshop

  • Outline:  The workshop will look at What Public Engagement is; Why does it matter?; How to do it: Engagement in practice; Internal support for creating a supportive environment for engagement
  • Date: Wednesday 23 May 2012
  • Time: 9.30 am – 11.30 am
  • Room: PG22
  • Facilitator: Dr Rebecca Edwards
  • Booking: graduateschool@bournemouth.ac.uk

Practice-Led Research

  • Outline: What are the fundamentals of practice-led research?
  • Date: Wednesday 23 May 2012
  • Time: 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm
  • Room: PG22 Poole House, Talbot Campus
  • Facilitator: Dr Stephen Bell and Associate Professor Neal White
  • Booking: graduateschool@bournemouth.ac.uk

Intellectual Property & Copyright

  • Outline: Understanding IPR and Copyright in relation to your research
  • Date: Wednesday 30 May 2012
  • Time: 15:00 pm –17:00 pm
  • Room: PG22 Poole House, Talbot Campus
  • Facilitator: Dr Sukhpreet Singh
  • Booking: graduateschool@bournemouth.ac.uk

Academic Writing Skills Course

  • Outline: This workshop covers essential good practice in writing, editing techniques and methods of improving organisation
  • Date: Monday 18 June 2012
  • Time: 09.30 am – 4.30 pm (lunch will be provided)
  • Room: P401, Poole House, Talbot Campus
  • Facilitator: Sue Mitchell (external visitor)
  • Booking: graduateschool@bournemouth.ac.uk  FULLY BOOKED – places still available for the same workshop on 19 June (see below)

Academic Writing Skills Course

  • Outline: This workshop covers essential good practice in writing, editing techniques and methods of improving organisation
  • Date: Tuesday 19 June 2012
  • Time: 09.30 am – 4.30 pm (lunch will be provided)
  • Room: EBC704, Executive Business Centre, Lansdowne Campus
  • Facilitator: Sue Mitchell (external visitor)
  • Booking: graduateschool@bournemouth.ac.uk There are limited places available for this workshop, so book early to avoid disappointment!

Postgraduate Research Conference

  • Outline: This annual conference is designed to showcase the best of BU’s postgraduate research and to provide a unique opportunity for PGRs to present their work within a learning environment. Our multi-disciplinary conference will allow for cross-school interaction as well as opportunities for collaboration, where appropriate. Full details can be found here
  • Date: Thursday 28 June 2012
  • Time: 09.30 am – 4.30 pm (lunch will be provided)
  • Room: Thomas Hardy Suite
  • Booking: graduateschool@bournemouth.ac.uk  

Details of further workshops coming soon!

Details will be published on the BU Research Blog, so subscribe today to the BU Research Blog to keep in touch with current events to avoid the disappointment of missing out!

BU Researcher Development Programme – May/June 2012

Sessions for the BU Researcher Development Programme from May to June 2012 are below. Booking is essential as places are limited – details of how to book are listed under each session.

Statistics Surgeries: Individual statistics advice with Dr John Beavis

 Preparing for your Viva

  • Outline: Getting yourself prepared for your viva voce?
  • Date: Wednesday 16 May 2012
  • Time: 10:00 am – 12:00 pm **NOTE REVISED TIME
  • Room: PG22 Poole House, Talbot Campus
  • Facilitator: Dr Heather Hartwell
  • Booking: graduateschool@bournemouth.ac.uk

Public Engagement Workshop

  • Outline:  The workshop will look at What Public Engagement is; Why does it matter?; How to do it: Engagement in practice; Internal support for creating a supportive environment for engagement
  • Date: Wednesday 23 May 2012
  • Time: 9.30 am – 11.30 am
  • Room: PG22
  • Facilitator: Dr Rebecca Edwards
  • Booking: graduateschool@bournemouth.ac.uk

Practice-Led Research

  • Outline: What are the fundamentals of practice-led research?
  • Date: Wednesday 23 May 2012
  • Time: 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm
  • Room: PG22 Poole House, Talbot Campus
  • Facilitator: Dr Stephen Bell and Associate Professor Neal White
  • Booking: graduateschool@bournemouth.ac.uk

 Academic Writing Skills Course

  • Outline: This workshop covers essential good practice in writing, editing techniques and methods of improving organisation
  • Date: Monday 18 June 2012
  • Time: 09.30 am – 4.30 pm (lunch will be provided)
  • Room: P401, Poole House, Talbot Campus
  • Facilitator: Sue Mitchell (external visitor)
  • Booking: graduateschool@bournemouth.ac.uk  There are limited places available for this workshop, so book early to avoid disappointment!

Academic Writing Skills Course

  • Outline: This workshop covers essential good practice in writing, editing techniques and methods of improving organisation
  • Date: Tuesday 19 June 2012
  • Time: 09.30 am – 4.30 pm (lunch will be provided)
  • Room: EBC704, Executive Business Centre, Lansdowne Campus
  • Facilitator: Sue Mitchell (external visitor)
  • Booking: graduateschool@bournemouth.ac.uk There are limited places available for this workshop, so book early to avoid disappointment!

Postgraduate Research Conference

  • Outline: This annual conference is designed to showcase the best of BU’s postgraduate research and to provide a unique opportunity for PGRs to present their work within a learning environment. Our multi-disciplinary conference will allow for cross-school interaction as well as opportunities for collaboration, where appropriate. Full details can be found here
  • Date: Thursday 28 June 2012
  • Time: 09.30 am – 4.30 pm (lunch will be provided)
  • Room: Thomas Hardy Suite
  • Booking: graduateschool@bournemouth.ac.uk  

Details of further workshops coming soon!

Details will be published on the BU Research Blog, so subscribe today to the BU Research Blog to keep in touch with current events to avoid the disappointment of missing out!

PGR students – sign up to the BU Research Themes!

The BU Research Themes were launched in December at the first of the BU-wide Fusion events. The Themes are societally-led, encourage cross-School working and collaboration, and will be the main vehicle through which BU research is presented externally in future.

We’re now encouraging postgraduate research students to sign up to one or more of the Themes! This is a great way to get involved in the BU research environment and to meet other academics and students from across the University.

There are eight BU Research Themes:

  • Creative & Digital Economies
  • Culture & Society
  • Entrepreneurship & Economic Growth
  • Environmental Change & Biodiversity
  • Green Economy & Sustainability
  • Health, Wellbeing & Aging
  • Leisure & Recreation
  • Technology & Design

If you would like to join one or more of the Themes, then complete the form below and I will add you to the list.

Your Name (required)

Your Email (required)

Your School / Professional Service (required)

Staff or PGR student? (required)
StaffPGR

Please select the themes that you are interested in (required)

Colleague supervision – and maximising research opportunities

This blog post considers two aspects of research – supervision and publication. The two came together in article of mine recently been published online by the Journal of Further & Higher Education (JFHE) http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0309877X.2011.644774.

In 2008/09, I undertook the PGCert Research Degree Supervision to further develop supervision skills. For the second assignment, I made a study of colleague supervision – the supervision of staff doctoral students by their colleagues and, sometimes, managers. From it, an academic paper was developed and later submitted to JFHE. The article was an opportunity to maximise the outcomes of my study of research supervision and to create insights (possibly “new knowledge”) into a sometimes contentious and little researched area.

The starting point was a claim by Pam Denicolo (2004) that colleague supervision was “a role relationship that has been largely ignored or undervalued by [university] administration” (p. 693) and colleague students and supervisors “felt more vulnerable” than other students/supervisors (p. 706). At the time, I was Deputy Dean (Education) in the Media School and had, at BU and a previous university, observed colleague students often struggling to manage the roles of teacher, researcher, colleague and administrator. So the aim of my qualitative study amongst students and supervisors was to gain greater insight into the colleague students’ research journey and to consider how their working lives could be better structured.

Broadly, the indications from this small-scale study were:

  • The students and supervisors did not feel they were “ignored”, “undervalued” or “vulnerable.” There were some advantages of easy access to supervisors that other PGRs don’t have;
  • More effort is needed on the research training of colleague students. Those coming into doctoral studies from professional backgrounds said that they often learnt “on the hoof”;
  • Some students, in 2009 interviews, feared for their jobs without achievement of a doctoral qualification. Others saw it as an essential part of their development of academic research and professional skills;
  • Although Denicolo posited “vulnerability” as a power imbalance between supervisors and staff, the general attitude was that their supervisor was a “friendly facilitator” and supportive;
  • Confidentiality of performance on doctoral studies was expected by students as part of their relationship with the colleague supervision;
  • The use of group supervision by HSC to support students was seen as very beneficial in aiding cohort progress and reducing the loneliness of the doctoral student’s research journey.

This was a small-scale study (six students and five supervisors) and thus there are limitations of its generalisability, but it indicates that colleague supervision needs to be considered as a special case and not just part of the academic “day job”.

Prof Tom Watson, The Media School

Article:  Watson, T., 2011. Colleague supervision – ‘ignored and undervalued’? The views of students and supervisors in a new university. Journal of Further & Higher Education. DOI: 10.1080/0309877X.2011.644774.

Reference: Denicolo, P., 2004. Doctoral supervision of colleagues: Peeling off the veneer of satisfaction and competence. Studies in Higher Education, 29 (6), 693-707.

PGR Workshops: January 2012

Sessions for the BU Researcher Development Programme in  January 2012 are below.  Booking is essential as places are limited, details of how to book are listed under each session.

PGR Induction Dr Fiona Knight

Introduction to BU’s academic and professional support for your research degree

Can social media enhance my research profile? Susan Dowdle

Using Twitter, blogs, social citation to raise your research profile.  Discussion on how to use Web 2.0 technologies professionally and some top tips on making connections and raising your profile.

Introduction to Education Practice: for Postgraduate Research Students (PGRs) Linda Byles

This 3 day event is designed to prepare Post-Graduate Research students to undertake their teaching responsibilities

Grant Writing Workshop for Early Career Researchers Martin Pickard (external)

This workshop is aimed at early career researchers and phd students in the mid to late stages of their phd, starting to think about grant writing.  More details on the event can be found in this blog post.

  • Date: 26 January
  • Time: 9:30 – 17:00
  • Room: K103, Kimmeridge House
  • Booking:  All bookings for this event are via Susan Dowdle

Introduction to Mixed Methods Research Dr Carol Bond

These sessions are primarily aimed at new PGRs however all PGRs and ECRs are welcome.

Getting Out There

When I finished my PhD here at BU in 2006, all I had to show for it was…a PhD. There is nothing wrong with that, but my research career only really began when I had completed my doctoral studies; I presented my first international conference paper the following year, and my first journal article finally appeared a year after that.

Now I’m a supervisor of PhD students, and most are already submitting their work to conferences and writing journal articles. This provides a corollary to my own advice and support, and in many ways it also holds me to account. In June, the Times Higher Education reported that:

 “For those hoping to progress to a more stable academic career, the figures make for depressing reading. The NSF estimates that only 26 per cent of recent PhD recipients in the US will secure a tenure-track position. UK postdocs appear to have even more reason for pessimism” (Jump, 2011).

This is rather a bleak assessment, but even so, it is clear that a PhD is no longer the ‘entry level’ route into a research career it once was. At BU, we want our PGRs to be competitive, so it is imperative that our PGRs have a clutch of conference papers, a publication-or-two and a bit of teaching experience behind them on exiting their doctoral research.

This workload must of course be carefully managed, but there is nothing to stop full-time BU PGRs undertaking our P/G Cert in Education Practice. As for publications, there are now hundreds of open access journals online, and even some of the most prestigious ones have themed issues and room for smaller ‘research reports’ on work in progress. All supervisors need to be aware of these places and not leave it for their students to find them.

BU has a postgraduate conference each year, which is an excellent nursery for presenting at national and international conferences later. Most subject areas now have established conferences; the Media, Communication and Cultural Studies Association has both a national conference and a dedicated postgraduate one – which BU hosted this year. Just last week I met an eminent broadcasting history scholar who praised a BU PGR she had seen at a recent symposium in Winchester. This can only reflect well on us and validates the students’ work.

So if our PhD students finished with…just a PhD, then to an extent we have failed them. Part of being a good PhD supervisor is not just to help bring the project to completion, but to also nurture the beginnings of a research career; the dialogue with ‘outside’ scholarship needs to get going as soon as possible.

 

Richard Berger – Associate Prof & Head of Postgraduate Research, The Media School.

BU Santander Scholarships 2011-12 round 2 – apply now!

Santander is offering four x £5,000 research and travel grants to BU staff and research students

After the success of the Santander Scholarship competition a couple of months ago, Santander have offered BU staff and research students the opportunity to apply for further scholarships in a second round of funding.

The funds must be used for a specific project to build on or develop links with at least one university from the Santander overseas network. Awards will be announced in January 2012, and funds must be spent before the end of July 2012. Preference will be given to applications received from postgraduate research students and early career researchers.

Funds can only be used to cover direct costs (i.e. not salary costs or overheads).

To apply complete the Santander application form and submit it by email to Susan Dowdle: sdowdle@bournemouth.ac.uk

Successful applicants will be expected to participate in general PR activities about their research. This may involve attending events and promoting the benefits of the funding.

The closing date for applications is Friday 9 December 2011.

Unsuccessful submissions from the last round of the Santander Scholarship funding cannot be resubmitted to this round.

Good luck 🙂

BU Santander Scholarships 2011-12 – apply now!!

Santander is offering five x £5,000 research and travel grants to BU staff and students

The funds must be used for a specific project to build on or develop links with at least one university from the Santander overseas network. Trips must be taken before February 2012.

Preference will be given to applications received from postgraduate research students and early career researchers.

Funds can only be used to cover direct costs (i.e. not salary costs or overheads).

To apply complete the Santander application form and submit it by email to: researchunit@bournemouth.ac.uk.

The closing date for applications is Friday 16 September 2011.

Good luck 🙂

BU Santander Scholarships 2011-12 – apply now!!

Santander is offering five x £5,000 research and travel grants to BU staff and students

The funds must be used for a specific project to build on or develop links with at least one university from the Santander overseas network. Trips must be taken before February 2012.

Preference will be given to applications received from postgraduate research students and early career researchers.

Funds can only be used to cover direct costs (i.e. not salary costs or overheads).

To apply complete the Santander application form and submit it by email to: researchunit@bournemouth.ac.uk.

The closing date for applications is Friday 16 September 2011.

Good luck 🙂

Thoughts on writing recommendations for a research thesis

Prof Edwin van Teijlingen (HSC) examined a PhD candidate last year whose recommendations were only Prof Edwin van Teijlingenvaguely related to the work presented in the thesis. Since then he has examined several PhD theses which had an interesting range of recommendations not directly related to the student’s study findings. Listed below are his ideas about ‘appropriate’ recommendations:

Many postgraduate students make recommendations that are too broad, too generic, or not directly related to the exact topic of their research. These recommendations are not wrong; they are simply not specific / relevant enough. Examiners like to see some more mundane recommendations that come specifically from the thesis / research work.

First, you should not really recommend anything that you have not previously discussed in the Discussion. The rule ‘no new material’ in your Conclusion is also applicable to your ‘Recommendations’.University of Olomouc thesis from 1713 with motif of Ottoman Wars

Secondly, recommendations are not the same as conclusions. Consider recommendations go one step further than conculsions as (a) ‘something’; (b) ‘someone’; and (c) ‘needs to do’.

Furthermore, there may be different levels within your set of Recommendations, with recommendations for (a) academic (i.e. more research is needed into…), (b) for policy-makers (e.g. data protection act needs to change to accommodate…); for (c) practitioners (e.e. managers in local government need to consider the mental well-bing of their staff); or recommendation for (d) training / education (e.g. health promotion officers employed in inner-city Birmingham need to be trained in being culturally sensitive to several large ethnic minority communities to help them fulfil their role better in the community).

We’re interested to know your thoughts on this and to hear your experiences of advising postgraduate students when writing their recommendations. Let us know what you think by adding a comment.