Tagged / research data

UK Data Service Webinars

We have received notification of the following external webinars:

UK Data Service webinars – April to June 2020

Take a look at our 2020 free online training programme of regular introductory webinars. To help you get the most from the UK Data Service, our series of webinars introduce different aspects of the Service. Join us for:

  • Introduction to the UK Data Service, 7 May
  • Finding and accessing data in the UK Data Service, 14 May
  • Key issues in reusing data, 21 May
  • Data management basics, 28 May
  • Guided walk through ReShare, 4 June

These webinars take place from 15.00 – 16.00.

We also provide more specialised webinars, including:

  • Web-scraping for Social Science Research: Websites as a Source of Data, 23 April, 15.00 – 16.00
  • Web-scraping for Social Science Research: APIs as a Source of Data, 30 April, 15.00 – 16.00
  • Being a Computational Social Scientist, 12 May, 13.00 – 14.00
  • Power Pivot and Dynamic Arrays in Excel, 19 May, 15.00 – 16.00

To book a place visit the UK Data Service events page.

Slides and recordings of UK Data Service webinars are made available on our past events pages and YouTube channel soon after the event has taken place.

This post is for information only. Bournemouth University is not responsible for the content or any other aspects of such external websites.

ESRC have updated their Research Data policy

The ESRC has updated its research data policy .

The key points are:

  • it is the grant holder’s responsibility to incorporate data management as an integral part of the research project, and
  • data must be made available for re-use or archiving with the ESRC data service providers within three months of the end of the grant.

Please click on the link above for further information.

Sharing your research data?

Would you be prepared to share your data with the wider research community or the general public? 

A report published by the Research Information Network has found that UK data centres, which collect, store and supply research data to academics (such as the National Geoscience Data Centre at the British Geological Survey), have boosted research efficiency and improved a “culture of sharing data”.  However, the report adds that work is needed to encourage researchers to submit more data to the centres.

The Royal Society has an ongoing major policy study that looks at the use of scientific information as it affects scientists and society, “Science As a Public Enterprise”.   In theory raw data should be available for validation and further exploration but issues of quality control, appropriate retention policies, and the utility of storage of vast arrays of ‘raw’ data require urgent attention.  The study is primarily focusing on the exchange of information among scientists and other scientifically literate audiences.  A secondary focus of the study is public engagement with scientific information.

The British Academy response to the project is that all data produced through publicly funded research should be made available, provided confidentiality is protected, so that public policy and debate can be based on the best available evidence.  They suggest that opening up data could also have the advantage of aiding interaction between the arts and sciences.