Tagged / research process seminars

Research process seminar. From personal experience to theory-building: developing new methods and research directions out of transformative experiences. Tuesday 29th Nov at 2pm on Zoom

You are welcome to join us for this week’s research process seminar. Hosted in FMC but open to all staff and research students.

From personal experience to theory-building: developing new methods and research directions out of transformative experiences – by Prof. Roman Gerodimos

How do personally transformative experiences inform our thinking and inspire our research? How can we design new research agendas and methods based on micro-level (or even autobio) experiences? 

Using my experience of Burning Man and a recent British Academy bid as a case study, I will reflect on the interaction between our ‘real life’ experiences and the ‘big theory’ questions we grapple with in our research, how that can inform method design, and also how the interaction between the individual and the social map onto broader questions in psychosocial studies. The concept of change – when, how and why this happens – is key to this discussion and the self can act as a useful ‘petri dish’ for broader experimentation.

Tuesday 29 November at 2pm on Zoom:

https://bournemouth-ac-uk.zoom.us/j/9292103478?pwd=UzJnNTNQWDdTNldXdjNWUnlTR1cxUT09

Meeting ID: 929 210 3478

Passcode: rps!4fmc

Today’s research process seminar: Quantitative content analysis. Tuesday 24th May at 2pm on Zoom.

You are warmly welcomed to this week’s research process seminar. Hosted in FMC but open to all.

This week we have an external speaker, Dr Sarah Van Leuven, who will speak about quantitative content analysis.

Sarah Van Leuven is associate professor at the Department of Communication Studies at Ghent University. She is the head of the research group Center for Journalism Studies (CJS), head of the Journalism Division of NeFCA (Netherlands-Flanders Communication Association), and editorial board member of the SSCI-ranked journal Digital Journalism. Since 2021 she is a member of the Flemish Council for Journalism (Raad voor de Journalistiek).

She has published work on a broad range of topics, including the role of news media in political communication, sourcing practices, international news, journalist profiles and innovation in newsrooms. Together with prof. dr. Karin Raeymaeckers, she coordinates the five-annual survey of Belgian professional journalists, and she is also principal investigator for Belgium in the Journalistic Role Performance Project.

Details of her talk are below. This will be of use to anyone who is interested in methods of analysing media or other texts as part of a research study.

In this session, I will present a step-by-step toolbox to develop a reliable research design for a content analysis. Specifically, I will discuss how theoretical constructs can be translated into manifest content variables, and how research outcomes can be influenced by sampling decisions. The different steps will be illustrated by means of a content analysis study of “global journalism”.

2pm on 24th May. 

https://bournemouth-ac-uk.zoom.us/j/9292103478?pwd=UzJnNTNQWDdTNldXdjNWUnlTR1cxUT09

Meeting ID: 929 210 3478

Passcode: rps!4fmc

Hope to see you there

Dan and Sae

Research process seminar today. Rhetorical Analysis in Social Science Research. 2pm on Zoom

You are warmly welcomed to join us for today’s research process seminar. Hosted in FMC but open to all staff and research students.

 

Rhetorical Analysis in Social Science Research by Dr Chris Miles (BU)

This session looks at how rhetorical analysis can be used for analysing data in social science/political science research. Rhetorical analysis provides an alternative approach to thematic analysis, discourse analysis, etc. This session will address what makes rhetorical analysis ‘rhetorical’ and also looks at how it provides some interesting perspectives on how interview and focus group respondents try to persuade the researcher.

Tuesday 17th May at 2pm on Zoom.

https://bournemouth-ac-uk.zoom.us/j/9292103478?pwd=UzJnNTNQWDdTNldXdjNWUnlTR1cxUT09

Meeting ID: 929 210 3478

Passcode: rps!4fmc

Hope to see you there

 

Dan and Sae

Research process seminar today, 19th April. Social media analysis – possibilities and pitfalls. 2pm on Zoom

You are warmly welcomed to today’s research process seminar. Hosted in FMC but open to all.

Today’s speaker is Prof. Anders Olof Larsson

Anders is one of the world’s leading researchers of online political communication. He is also a truly interdisciplinary scholar and has mastered the methods of extracting and analysing social media data from all of the major platforms. His talk will reflect on his 10+ years of working on social media platforms, and how the rules and methods of collecting data have changed.

Bio:

Anders Olof Larsson (PhD, Uppsala University, 2012) is Professor at the Department of Communication, Kristiania University College. Larsson was previously a Postdoctoral Fellow working in the Social media and Agenda-Setting in election campaigns project at the Department of Media and Communication, University of Oslo. During his PhD work, which was funded by The Swedish Research School of Management and Information Technology, Larsson took part in the 2011 Oxford Internet Institute Summer Doctoral Programme. His PhD thesis – “Doing Things in Relation to Machines – Studies on Online Interactivity” (pdf) – was awarded the 2012 Börje Langefors award (for best Swedish thesis within the field of Informatics) and the 2012 FSMK Doctoral Dissertation award (for best Swedish thesis within the field of media and communication studies). Anders Olof Larsson’s research interests include the use of online interactivity and social media by societal institutions and their audiences, journalism studies, political communication and methodology, especially quantitative and computational methods. As of January 2021, Larsson’s work has been cited 4147 times, resulting in an h-index of 33 and an i10-index of 57. In June of 2017, Larsson was ranked as among the top 100 most productive researchers in Norway. In October 2020, Larsson was the only communication & media studies scholar with a Norwegian affiliation ranked among the top 2 % in his field worldwide following a ranking from Stanford University

 

The subject of Anders’ session is: Social media analysis – possibilities and pitfalls 

What types of data can we get from different social media platforms, such as Facebook, Instagram or Twitter? I will present the possibilities we currently have, and I will also touch upon some interesting opportunities for analysis of social media data.

April 19th, 2pm on Zoom.

https://bournemouth-ac-uk.zoom.us/j/9292103478?pwd=UzJnNTNQWDdTNldXdjNWUnlTR1cxUT09

Meeting ID: 929 210 3478

Passcode: rps!4fmc

We hope to see you there!

 

Computational Approaches to Online Uncivil Discourse. Research process seminar. 2pm, Tuesday 5th April on Zoom

You are warmly welcomed to join us for this research process seminar presented by Dr Patrícia Rossini, a Derby Fellow of Communication and Media at University of Liverpool. Again, this talk is highly interdisciplinary and should be of interest to staff and research students from across the university.

Computational Approaches to Online Uncivil Discourse – by Dr Patrícia Rossini

This session will focus on the process of using supervised machine learning to develop algorithms to classify large quantities of data, with a focus on complex concepts such as uncivil and intolerant discourse. We will discuss the challenges of scaling up nuanced content analysis work with machine learning, some best practices in generating high-quality data, and the overall advantages and disadvantages of using computational methods to study complex issues. 

Bio:

Dr Patrícia Rossini is a Derby Fellow in the Department of Communication and Media. Prior to joining the University of Liverpool, Dr. Rossini was a postdoctoral research fellow in the School of Information Studies at Syracuse University (USA). She has a Ph.D. in Communication from the Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Broadly speaking, her research is concentrated on the impact of social media in politics and democracy. Specifically, Patrícia studies informal political talk online, with an emphasis on incivility and intolerance, and provides a conceptual framework to identify the extent to which these behaviors are democratically harmful. She is also interested in computational social sciences and is currently working on developing algorithms to measure strategic communication and political discussion online. Other research interests include political campaigns online, political deliberation, and political participation.

Patrícia is currently (co-) principal investigator in five externally funded projects. She is the lead investigator in a grant awarded by Facebook to investigate perceptions of uncivil and intolerant discourse online in four countries, and on a project to study the use of private messaging apps and social media as sources for political misinformation, funded by WhatsApp. She is co-lead investigator on a project funded by Twitter to investigate conversational dynamics and develop metrics to detect polarization, incivility, and intolerance in discussions around contentious and non-contentious topics, co-lead investigator of a comparative research project funded by Facebook to study visual misinformation on social media in eight countries across five continents, and co-lead investigator on a project analyzing political advertising on Facebook in the 2020 elections in the United States, supported by the Knight Foundation.

Tuesday 5th April at 2pm on Zoom

https://bournemouth-ac-uk.zoom.us/j/9292103478?pwd=UzJnNTNQWDdTNldXdjNWUnlTR1cxUT09

Meeting ID: 929 210 3478

Passcode: rps!4fmc

Research process seminar: Computational Approaches to Online Uncivil Discourse. Tues 15 March at 2pm on Zoom

You are warmly invited to join us for this week’s research process seminar. Hosted by FMC but open to all staff and PGR students.

Computational Approaches to Online Uncivil Discourse by Dr. Patrícia Rossini

This session will focus on the process of using supervised machine learning to develop algorithms to classify large quantities of data, with a focus on complex concepts such as uncivil and intolerant discourse. We will discuss the challenges of scaling up nuanced content analysis work with machine learning, some best practices in generating high-quality data, and the overall advantages and disadvantages of using computational methods to study complex issues.

Bio

Dr Patrícia Rossini is a Derby Fellow in the Department of Communication and Media. Prior to joining the University of Liverpool, Dr. Rossini was a postdoctoral research fellow in the School of Information Studies at Syracuse University (USA). She has a Ph.D. in Communication from the Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Broadly speaking, her research is concentrated on the impact of social media in politics and democracy. Specifically, Patrícia studies informal political talk online, with an emphasis on incivility and intolerance, and provides a conceptual framework to identify the extent to which these behaviors are democratically harmful. She is also interested in computational social sciences and is currently working on developing algorithms to measure strategic communication and political discussion online. Other research interests include political campaigns online, political deliberation, and political participation.

Patrícia is currently (co-) principal investigator in five externally funded projects. She is the lead investigator in a grant awarded by Facebook to investigate perceptions of uncivil and intolerant discourse online in four countries, and on a project to study the use of private messaging apps and social media as sources for political misinformation, funded by WhatsApp. She is co-lead investigator on a project funded by Twitter to investigate conversational dynamics and develop metrics to detect polarization, incivility, and intolerance in discussions around contentious and non-contentious topics, co-lead investigator of a comparative research project funded by Facebook to study visual misinformation on social media in eight countries across five continents, and co-lead investigator on a project analyzing political advertising on Facebook in the 2020 elections in the United States, supported by the Knight Foundation.

Tuesday 15 March at 2pm

https://bournemouth-ac-uk.zoom.us/j/9292103478?pwd=UzJnNTNQWDdTNldXdjNWUnlTR1cxUT09

Meeting ID: 929 210 3478

Passcode: rps!4fmc

Research process seminar: Research, Policy Impact and Evidence. Tuesday 8th March at 2pm on Zoom

You are warmly invited to join us for this week’s research process seminar. Hosted in FMC but open to all.

This session is the first of a series of seminars looking at research impact. John will reflect on his impact case study for REF 2021 (submitted for UoA34) and his ongoing role with UK Parliament in giving you practical tips on developing evidence of impact in the policy sphere.

Research, Policy Impact and Evidence – by Prof. John Oliver

This session will provide an outline of how to produce evidence that establishes the policy impact of your research. In particular, it will provide examples of recent policy impacts with both the UK communications regulator Ofcom and UK Parliament. 

Tuesday 8th March at 2pm on Zoom

https://bournemouth-ac-uk.zoom.us/j/9292103478?pwd=UzJnNTNQWDdTNldXdjNWUnlTR1cxUT09

Meeting ID: 929 210 3478

Passcode: rps!4fmc

Hope to see you there