Category / Research communication

Another free workshop for postgraduate researchers (presentation skills)

Presentation Skills Workshop

Facilitated by Dr Margaret Collins (Training for Universities)

Date: Tuesday 29 January              Date: Friday 29 March

Time: 09:30 – 16:30                        Time: 09:30 – 16:30

Register Here                                    Register Here

Surveys regularly reveal that public speaking is the most feared business activity and is dreaded even more than death!

Almost every research degree requires you to present your work to colleagues, at meetings, in seminars or at specialist conferences. At conferences, it can also be important to understand how these skills apply to the “business networking” opportunities that present themselves or to have and to use skills to chair a session effectively.

This workshop will begin by exploring the basic components of communication including listening skills, the power of body language, how to make an impact and strategies to hold the attention of your audience.

Participants are invited to deliver a short presentation and to receive coaching and feedback within the supportive workshop environment.

As a result of this workshop participants will:

  •     Understand the contributions of words, voice and body language
  •     Know four essential questions to answer when planning for a meeting
  •     Have structures to plan the content of a presentation
  •     Be clear about strategies to hold the attention of your audience
  •     Be prepared for dealing with questions
  •     Have effective strategies to deal with “presentation stress”

This workshop will be delivered to meet your specific needs.

To see comments from previous participants please visit: https://trainingforuniversities.com/workshops/presentation-skills.

This workshop is part of the wider Doctoral College: Researcher Development Programme.

Free workshop for postgraduate researchers (creative thinking and problem solving)

Creative Thinking and Problem Solving

Facilitated by Dr Margaret Collins (Training for Universities)

Date: Monday 28 January              Date: Thursday 28 March

Time: 13:30 – 16:30                        Time: 13:30 – 16:30

Register Here                                    Register Here

Significant keys to success in research include being able to ask the right question, to interpret the data, to see new patterns, to make links between the not-so-obvious associations. These are skills that are developed to provide new and creative answers to your research challenges.

During this workshop we will develop your ability to ask questions, to think outside the box, to see things differently and generate a wider range of possibilities.

We will use a range of techniques including group discussion, group activities and targeted exercises to develop your creative thinking and problem solving skills.

Do come ready to work on your own research ideas, problems or challenges and be prepared to develop some surprising possibilities.

As a result of this workshop participants will

  • Know the first step to solving a problem is to ask the right question
  • Be able to use a range of techniques for stimulating creative processes
  • Understand how learning styles and behaviour influence creative activity
  • Have techniques to generate ideas and select solutions
  • Access resources for creative thinking, problem solving and decision making

This workshop is part of the wider Doctoral College: Researcher Development Programme.

Building Evidence for REF Impact Case Studies

MONDAY 11th February

A new workshop has been arranged for researchers who are building an impact case and are looking for guidance or reassurance about developing evidence.

Through this workshop researchers will see how expectations regarding evidence relate to their own impact cases, and will improve their understanding of what is needed to make sure the evidence is strong and what activities are required to put in place all the pieces before submission.

The workshop will be held on the Talbot Campus. More details can be found here.

Dr Elvira Bolat featured in BBC World Service documentary

In December 2018 BBC World Service has broadcasted its new documentary titled “When you tire of tech”. The documentary is presented by Ana Matronic who explored dangers associated with tech addiction and what is done currently to minimise our over-reliance on tech.

The documentary features the interview with Dr Elvira Bolat, who comments on intimate relationships tech users have with their devices and social media. This interview is underpinned by various studies Dr Bolat has carried out to understand the usage of mobile tech and social media by consumers and businesses. It is also reflecting on the latest research discoveries around social media influencing and the dark side of relationships between social media leaders and followers – work co-authored with Dr Parisa Gilani and BA (Hons) Business Studies with Marketing graduate, Cladia Wilkin.

Do listen to the podcast and tune in to discover what Dr Bolat has said [12:35].

CRN Wessex Awards – shortlist revealed

Huge congratulations to our colleagues at neighbouring NHS Trusts, who have been shortlisted for a CRN Wessex Award!

The Wessex Awards comprises seven categories which celebrate those who have made outstanding contributions to the delivery of NIHR CRN portfolio studies. The categories are:

– Rising star
– Excellence in the delivery of commercial research studies
– Outstanding research professional
– Excellence in patient & public involvement & engagement
– Outstanding collaborative working
– Outstanding clinical trial support
– Outstanding research leaders

You can see the shortlist here.

Great to see those we work with closely being appreciated for their hard work. Congratulations again!

NHS Research – Twitter pages to follow!

There is a huge amount of research being conducted across the county by our neighbouring NHS Trusts – you can follow them all on Twitter on the links below.

It’s a great way to keep up to date with developments, news and upcoming events. as well as interesting articles related to healthcare research:

Follow Dorset County Hospital Research & Innovation’s page here;
Follow Royal Bournemouth Hospital’s Research page here:
Follow Dorset HealthCare Research & Development’s page here;
Follow Poole Hospital’s page here.

Happy tweeting!

Remember that support is on offer at BU if you are thinking of introducing your research ideas into the NHS – email the Research Ethics mailbox, and take a look at the Clinical Governance blog.

First CQR “Go Create!” Seminar of the New Year Wed 9 Jan 1 pm RLH 409

Pleased to let you know that the year is kicking off for CQR with an intriguing seminar led by

Kathleen Vandenberghe

“Expressing research findings with an artist”

RLH 409 Wed 9 Jan at 1pm.

All are welcome!

Kathleen’s work involves:

  1. the experience of expressing research findings with an artist who is not a co-researcher

  2. the experience of aiming for an expressing of research findings while holding the view that understanding is relational and positioned and consequently not static

  3. exploration whether the artistic input generates new understandings of the research findings

We are sure that her work will inspire an interesting discussion on Wednesday.
Come along, bring you lunch in you’d like …

even better, bring a friend!

Introduction to Good Clinical Practice – 17th January 2019

Are you interested in running your own research project within the NHS? Good Clinical Practice, or ‘GCP’, is a requirement for those wishing to work on clinical research projects in a healthcare setting.

GCP is the international ethical, scientific and practical standard to which all clinical research is conducted. By undertaking GCP, you’re able to demonstrate the rights, safety and wellbeing of your research participants are protected, and that the data collected are reliable.

The next GCP full day session is scheduled for Thursday 17th January, at Bournemouth University, Lansdowne Campus (Executive Business Centre) – 8:45am – 4:30pm.

The day will comprise of the following sessions:

  • Introduction to research and the GCP standards;
  • Preparing to deliver your study;
  • Identifying and recruiting participants – eligibility and informed consent;
  • Data collection and ongoing study delivery;
  • Safety reporting;
  • Study closure.

If you’re interested in booking a place, please contact Research Ethics.

Remember that support is on offer at BU if you are thinking of introducing your research ideas into the NHS – email the Research Ethics mailbox, and take a look at the Clinical Governance blog.

First publication of 2019

Having had the pleasure of announcing the last BU publication yesterday, today we received an email that our paper ‘Design errors in vital sign charts used in consultant-led maternity units in the United Kingdom’ has been accepted by the International Journal of Obstetric Anesthesia.  This paper is led by FHSS Visiting Faculty Gary Smith and Richard Isaac and has as co-authors Vanora Hundley, Lisa Gale-Andrews and Edwin van Teijlingen as well as two further BU Visiting Professors: Mike Wee and Debra Bick.

CHAIN – Contact, Help, Advice and Information Network

CHAIN is an online mutual support network for people working in health and social care. It gives people a simple and informal way of contacting each other to exchange ideas and share knowledge.

Members use CHAIN in all sorts of ways, from highly proactive networking to more passive ‘horizon-scanning’.
CHAIN also provides a simple mechanism for ideas which emerge in one context to be shared with fellow-members across boundaries of organisations, professions, and territories which makes the network unique.

Joining is free, and open to anyone working in these areas. You can see recent examples of feedback here, as well as a snapshot report here, of the network’s reach.

Follow CHAIN updates on Twitter; @CHAIN_Network ; Find them on Facebook; Connect with CHAIN on LinkedIn.

Congratulations to Dr. Mariam Vahdaninia

Congratulations to Dr. Vahdaninia in FHSS on the publication of her PhD paper ‘ω-3 LCPUFA supplementation during pregnancy and risk of allergic outcomes or sensitisation in offspring: a systematic review and meta-analysis’ which has been accepted by the Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. This journal is published by Elsevier and has an Impact factor of 2.6.

This paper addresses the increasing global trend in allergic diseases over the past last two decades with children suffering the highest burden. The increasing burden of allergic conditions is an important public health concern and understanding how to prevent the development of allergic diseases is a vital area of research. In this paper, the authors have assessed the effectiveness of omega-3 fatty acids in randomised controlled trials that have supplemented pregnant women during pregnancy for prevention of allergic diseases in children. Their results have shown that intake of omega-3 fatty acids during pregnancy can reduce the risk of sensitisation to egg and peanut in children. These findings have important implications in research since food allergies are common in children and are a key risk factor for developing sensitisation to aero-allergens and allergic respiratory diseases later in life.

The publication is available online at: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anai.2018.12.008

Congratulations!

Prof. Edwin van Teijlingen

Transparency in research: Health Research Authority survey results

The HRA recently carried out a survey which aimed to establish some of the current obstacles to transparency, and to identify future opportunities to improve practices.
The survey was advertised to researchers, researcher managers, sponsors and funders in order to collate views surrounding research transparency.

You can see the results here on the HRA website.

It’s vital that research participants are informed about the results of research, and in the beginning they are told about the research and implications, in a transparent fashion.

BU has access to the ClinicalTrials.gov system so get in touch if you would like access. This is a great opportunity to register your study and study results in the public domain.
Despite the name, the system may be used for other clinical research projects.

Health Research Authority releases eLearning for student researchers

The HRA have improved the information provided on their website for student researchers and those who support them, in planning to conduct research within the NHS.

The organisation has provided three bite size eLearning modules with a focus on the following topics:

  • Sponsors’ and supervisors’ role in educational research
  • Applying for HRA and HCRW (Health and Care Research Wales) Approval
  • Setting up research sites in England and Wales.

You can see the update here, and access the modules here.

Remember that support is on offer at BU if you are thinking of introducing your research ideas into the NHS – email the Research Ethics mailbox, and take a look at the Clinical Governance blog.

phinder – connecting researchers with public health professionals

The NIHR Public Health Research (PHR) Programme has supported the development of a new portal called phinder, which connects public health practice and research. The aim of the portal is to publicise new and forthcoming UK interventions that may have an impact on population health.

phinder helps connect researchers with public health professionals so that discussion can take place surrounding research possibilities. You can tell phinder about your own intervention and they will display on the portal. Alternatively you can take a look yourself to see whether you would be interested in evaluating any of the listed interventions.

UK hits milestone of sequencing 100,000 whole genomes in the NHS

Yesterday it was announced that the 100,000 Genomes Project, led by Genomics England in partnership with the NHS, has reached its goal of sequencing 100,000 whole genomes from NHS patients.

The project was launched in 2012 by former Prime Minister David Cameron. BU is on board with this project and has access to the data collected, providing great opportunities for research.

You can read the NIHR article here.

Two-day Workshop in Creative Writing for Academics now open!

Creative Writing for Academics

Workshop with Kip Jones

11 & 12 January 2019

Friday (10- 3) and Saturday (10-2),

11th and 12th January in EBC.

FREE! But you must register 

(email: kipworld@gmail.com)

and commit to participating for the two full days.

All are very welcome: students, staff & academics.

Places are limited and will fill up quickly.

  • By engaging in creative writing, it becomes possible for all to write more clearly, more simply, even more creatively, when writing for academic publication.

  • The workshop will present opportunities to work with new and creative levels through interfaces with techniques from the arts and humanities—fiction, poetry, auto-ethnography and biography, scriptwriting, techniques from filmmaking, including tags and loglines.

  • These intellectual exchanges encourage joint exploration of how authors can engage with principles and tools from the arts in order to expand and extend the possibilities of reaching wider audiences.

Read all about an earlier experience with the Creative Writing Workshop