Tagged / BURO

What it means to be Open? – Open Research day, 3rd of July

We would like to welcome everybody interested in research to our next Open Research day.

There will be drinks and cake!

When: 3rd of July

Where:

  • BG11 – 9am-12pm – presentation from 10am to 11am
  • FG04 – 1pm-4pm – presentation from 2pm to 3pm

Staff from RKEO and the library will be on hand to answer any enquiries you might have about Open Research.

There will also be a presentation entitled What it means to be Open? with a PechaKucha by members of RKEO and the library team, where we will explain the concept of Open Access, Research Data Management, link with REF2021 and how to deposit your research through BRIAN. Researchers are also going to share why they publish Open Access at Bournemouth University.

You are welcome to dip in and out, no need to stay for the full three hours!!

José

HSS Faculty Librarian

jlopezblanco@bournemouth.ac.uk

Help us choose a name for BU’s new Research Data Repository

We are now in the final stages of developing a repository solution for Bournemouth University research data.  Like its partner BURO (Bournemouth University Research Online), BU’s open access research output repository that shares your BRIAN deposits with the world, the new research data repository will provide a secure yet open access place to archive and showcase all of your research data once your research projects are complete.

Now we really need your help and creativity in suggesting a good name for this new Research Data Repository.

Some keywords to consider, but not exclusively, are Bournemouth University, research, data, repository and archive.  Remember, the name will be something that identifies our data repository and BU’s high quality research for many years to come, so think carefully.  Please note Data McDataface has already been discounted!

Please email your suggestions to rdm@bournemouth.ac.uk by Friday 24th November?

If your suggestion is judged to be the winning entry by the RDM Steering Group you will receive a mystery prize!

Find out more about Research Data Management (RDM) at BU via:

You can sign up to attend a RDM workshop here.

 

Emerald removes embargo period on all journal articles in open access repositories

Emerald has today, 26th September 2017, removed the embargo period on all Green open access. Author accepted manuscripts (AAMs or postprints) of journal articles held in open access repositories such as BURO will now be available on publication. This applies not only from today, but also to any Emerald publications currently under embargo in repositories.

Emerald Group Publishing

This is a huge advance for open access as Emerald had previously extended their embargo periods in response to the RCUK/ Finch statements on embargo periods and green open access.

Brexit and the implications for Open Access

Whilst it’s relatively early to predict what Brexit will mean for Open Access in the UK, JISC recently released a blog post outlining the main issues that will arise from the UK’s decision to leave the EU.

The blog post raises issues around the future of EU OA policy and also funding.

At the present time, it appears the main effect of Brexit will be to create greater reliance on Green OA (usually accepted, peer-reviewed versions of outputs) rather than gold paid open access owing to fluctuating financial markets and uncertainty surrounding future European funding.

Library and Learning Support have recently created a OA support video, looking at the benefits of OA and how you can make your research OA through engaging with BRIAN and BURO.

Please contact the BURO team with any queries you may have and we will be happy to help.

Don’t forget our guide Open Access and Depositing your research

Thinking about the next REF?

153px-Open_Access_logo_PLoS.svgHEFCE’s policy for open access states that all new peer-reviewed journal articles and papers from published conference proceedings (with ISSN) should be deposited in our institutional repository BURO (through BRIAN), in full text form. Full compliance with this policy is now crucial, as HEFCE’s requirements for the next REF include the condition that outputs can only be submitted to the REF if they are published as open access at the point of acceptance.

All researchers need to follow these three steps, to ensure that all your articles can be considered for the next REF.

1. Keep your Authors’ Accepted Manuscript1

  • Keep this version for journal articles and conference proceedings (with an ISSN).  This is not necessary for books, chapters or other output types.
  • This is necessary even if the publisher will make the article Open Access on publication.
  • Whether you are the sole author, a co-author, a postgraduate or a professor, you need to keep this version of your paper.

 

2. Upload the Authors’ Accepted Manuscript to BRIAN as soon as it is accepted for publication2

  • When your publisher sends you an acceptance notification, log into BRIAN to add the basic publication details and upload the document.
  • The Library will ensure compliance with any embargo date.
  • You are now compliant!

 

3. Contact the BRIAN or BURO team for help or advice

All researchers must follow this for their work to be considered for the REF, in line with the HEFCE’s policy for open access. A comprehensive list of FAQs on the policy is available.

RKEO and the Library will be available to provide relevant support during these drop-in sessions:

11 April – 12.30pm to 1.30pm – S117, Studland House

12 April – 12.30pm to 1.30pm – S117, Studland House

13 April – 12.30pm to 1.30pm – S117, Studland House

No booking is necessary, just turn up!

1 Authors’ Accepted Manuscript – this is the final peer-reviewed manuscript, before the proof reading starts for the published version.  It is often a Word document, publisher template, LaTeX file or PDF.

2 This is when the publisher confirms to you that your article has been accepted.

(Post adapted from University of Bath, Library resources)

Open Access Highlights from BURO – December 2015

There has been a massive 269% increase in deposited files for journal articles in January to November 2015 compared with the same period in 2014.

The Mock REF will have accelerated this depositing but we hope that, with the HEFCE deadline of April 2016 fast approaching, researchers will upload their accepted files to BRIAN (for BURO) as soon as they receive the publisher’s email advising them of acceptance.

BU researchers-article deposits: 1 January- 30 November 2015
ARTICLES.DEPOSITS1JAN-30NOV 2015

BU researchers-article deposits: 1 January- 30 November 2014
ARTICLES DEPOSITS 1JAN-30NOV 2014

The Faculty of Science & Technology (SciTech) has been particularly good at uploading files. Witness the increase of 244% on same period last year.

SciTech researchers- all deposits: 1 January – 30 November 2015
SCITECH ALL ITEMS 1JAN-30NOV.V1

SciTech researchers- all deposits: 1 January – 30 November 2014
SCITECH ALL EPOSITS 1JAN2014-30NOV2014.V1

To be eligible for submission in the next REF, journal articles and conference proceedings (with ISSN) accepted for publication after 1 April 2016 must be made open access.
In practice, this means the outputs must be deposited in an institutional repository (BURO) or subject repository within a three-month period from the point of acceptance for publication.
Depositing your manuscript in BRIAN, as soon as it is accepted, ensures that it will be eligible for submission to the next REF. This may mean that manuscripts need to be put online before they are formally published. Items under publisher embargo in BURO are still REF compliant.

We need to maintain the momentum!
So REMEMBER
As soon as you receive the email informing you that your output has been accepted for publication, upload the file to BRIAN.

See our guide Open access and depositing your research

Any queries about depositing please contact the BURO team.

BURO intermittently unavailable

BURO, BU’s open access repository for research, is currently experiencing some intermittent Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks, which means that occasionally it has been temporarily unavailable to our BURO Editorial Team and external users of open access content.  Please note, this does not seem to have affected the uploading files to BURO from BRIAN or the links to open access works embedded in your Staff Profile Pages.  The company that host BURO have been contacted and we hope all will be resolved shortly.

If you have any concerns please report to IT Services.

The guide Open Access and Depositing your Research will help answer some of your questions about open access.

If you have any further questions about depositing your research open access please contact buro@bournemouth.ac.uk

 

BU Research Related Systems

BU has a number of internal systems that enable research activity and outputs.  To find out what the systems are, what they do and how they interact with each other, visit the ‘BU Research Related Systems’ page, which can be found under ‘Research Toolkit’.

The new page contains all you need to know about:

BRIAN (Bournemouth Research Information And Networking) – BU’s publication management system and how it’s linked to the BU staff profile pages.  If you have any problems accessing the system or you have any queries please contact BRIAN@bournemouth.ac.uk and the BRIAN team will be happy to help.

BURO (Bournemouth University Research Online) – BU’s institutional repository. If you require help assessing whether an open access version of your work can be contributed to BURO please contact your Subject Library Team or SAS-BURO@bournemouth.ac.uk.

RED (Research and Enterprise Database) – this is a record of all the research and knowledge exchange activity which takes place at BU.  If you have any problems accessing the system or you have any queries please contact the R&KE Office .

Please note that Shelly Maskell is the new Research Outputs development officer within R&KEO and as part of this role, Shelly now manages BRIAN.

SHERPA/FACT – Funders and Author’s Open Access Compliance Tool

Use the new SHERPA/FACT tool to help you check if a journal’s open access policies complies with the requirements of the open access policies of the research funders that comprise Research Councils UK (RCUK) and the Wellcome Trust. The data on journal policies is drawn from SHERPA/RoMEO and the funders’ policies from SHERPA/JULIET.

The more established SHERPA Romeo website provides details of publisher copyright and archiving policies.  This tool will help you establish whether you can deposit your open access research papers in BURO (BU’s institutional repository), via BRIAN for free.  Contact the BURO Editorial Team or your Library Subject Team for more help and advice around making your research open access in BURO.

 

Celebrate International Open Access Week – the GREEN route!

open access logo, Public Library of ScienceThis week is International Open Access Week.  Now in its 6th year, this global awareness week aims to promote open access as a new norm for scholarship and research.  Research shows that making your research freely available dramatically increases the number of citations and leads to more people downloading the research papers, this increasing the academic and societal impact of your research.

The green route to open access is where a version of the paper is self-archived in a repository, such as our institutional repository BURO.  This process relies on researchers uploading their own papers.  Repositories offer a number of benefits.  They increase the availability of some published journal works with restrictions on reprinting or text mining, and may enable work to be propogated across the internet and used for novel applications. Repositories also allow authors to keep track of who is downloading their data.

BU has had an institutional repository since 2007 which contains full-text versions of outputs by BU authors.  This provides an excellent showcase of our research outputs to our students as well as making them freely available to a global audience.  You can upload the full-text of your output via BRIAN:

1. Log into your account and find the paper.

2. One of the tabs is ‘full text’.

3. If you click into this tab you will see a link near the Sherpa-Romeo logo to check your ‘publisher’s policy’.

4. Click on this and you will see the archiving policy for this particular journal, clearly stating which version of the paper can be uploaded.

5. Click ‘back’ and then click on the ‘full text’ tab again and you will see a link (in a blue box) to ‘upload new file for this publication’.

6. Upload the file and follow the onscreen instructions.

7. Your full text will then automatically feed through to BURO and be available open access in the next few days.

Find out about the GOLD route to open access publishing here: Gold route

Open access publishing – common minsunderstandings!

open access logo, Public Library of ScienceReflecting on the experience of our recent mock REF exercise I noted that there were some negative views towards open access publishing that were expressed during the process. This is a little concerning considering the UK government is planning to make all outputs arising from publicly-funded research available via open access outlets by 2014 and considering the open access mandates the major research funders have as part of the terms of their grant funding (including the research councils, the Wellcome Trust and the European Commission).  In addition, the four UK funding councils are currently consulting with the sector regarding their proposal to introduce a requirement for all outputs submitted to the post-2014 REF exercise to be published on an open access basis, wherever the concept of open access is relevant.  As an institution and as individual researchers we need to ensure that we are able to comply with these requirements and that we are able to positively embrace open access publishing.

I did a bit of research and came across an excellent article by Peter Suber, Director of the Harvard Open Access Project.  In the article, Peter addresses the common misunderstandings and misconceptions about open access publishing, many of which we part of the concerns raised during the recent mock REF exercises.  I’ve selected the ones I most frequently hear and provided a summary below, and would urge you to read the article in full here – A Field Guide to Misunderstandings About Open Access.

1. “All open access is gold open access” – not at all! Gold open access refers to open access through journals and green open access is via repositories.  Suber notes that researchers often overlook the existence of green open access or think they will not be permitted by their publisher to deposit a copy of their paper in an open source repository.  At BU we have our own institutional repository, BURO, and BU researchers can add the full-text version of their papers via BRIAN.  Suber notes that between 50-70+% of journal publishers give permission for postprint achiving in repositories.  BRIAN will check the copyright of the publisher for you and let you know which version of your paper can be added to BURO. Easy peasy!

2. “Open access is about bypassing peer review” – not true!  The goal of open access is to remove access barriers, not quality filters.  Open access journals can, and usually do, use the same peer review processes, the same standards, and even the same reviewers as traditional print journals.  Many traditional print journals offer an open access route as part of publishing in their journal (hybrid publishing).

3. “Authors must choose between prestigious publication and open access” – incorrect!  There are two reasons why open access is compatible with prestige:  a gold reason and a green one.  First, a growing number of open access journals have already earned high levels of prestige, and others are earning it.  Do your part to move things along as an editor, referee, reader, and as an author, by submitting your best work to suitable open access journals.  In the meantime consider the second reason.  Most traditional print journals allow open access archiving, such as in an institutional repository.

4. “Open access makes sense for second-rate work, but not for first-rate work” – again, not true!   The idea behind this misunderstanding is this:  the best work generally winds up in the best journals, where it has the best chance of being seen.  At least it should be steered toward the best journals, where it will have the best chance of being seen.  When we add the suggestion that this path doesn’t allow open access, or that open access can’t improve upon it, then an idea that was largely true becomes completely false.  It assumes that the best journals are never open access (not true – Nature, Science and IEEE for example all offer open access options); that only journals can deliver open access (not true – green open access); that the best journals never allow open access archiving (not true – see SherpaRomeo, Science for example permits achiving of post-print of the publisher’s PDF); and that open access archiving can’t increase the visibility and impact of work published in the best journals (not true). 

Suber notes 20 other common misunderstandings about open access and his article is well worth reading!

At Bournemouth University we are committed to supporting the open access movement and have been running the BU Open Access Publishing Fund for two years now and will continue into 2013-14.  For information on accessing the Fund please visit this page – BU OAPF.

We’re interested to hear your thoughts on open access publishing!  Have you tried it, are your sceptical, are you a supporter?

BRIAN – Depositing Full Text Articles

Full Text Articles should be uploaded through BRIAN to comply with Bournemouth University Academic Publications Policy on Open Access.

As most publishers allow the Accepted Version of journal articles to be made available this is the version we recommend authors deposit via BRIAN. The Accepted Version is the author-created final version that incorporates referee comments and is accepted for publication. It should not have the publisher’s typesetting or logo applied.

Supplementary files of various file formats can also be deposited as files or as zipped folders.  A listing of publishers, their journals and policy on archiving in BURO is provided by theSHERPA/RoMEO project; see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo.php.  BURO staff will liaise with the copyright holder regarding the inclusion of full text for other publication types.

Depositing files step by step

When in BRIAN, click on ‘my publications’ to see your full list of publications.  Each record will show a summary screen and below the title of each record you will see a set of six tabs. Click on the ‘Full text’ tab (the second tab from the right).

  

Click on the link ‘Manage full text’ where it says ‘Manage full text for this publication’.  The File management box will open. Browse and select the file(s) you wish to deposit. Click on Upload’. As indicated above, please include your final version in the first instance.

Books are rarely allowed, although some publishers will permit the use of a sample chapter.  BURO staff can liaise with the publishers on your behalf to check permissions.

Click on ‘Grant’   to confirm you are depositing the file(s) for possible dissemination via BURO. This process does not transfer copyright to BURO.  When you have deposited the files you wish to transfer to BURO click on ‘Home’ in the top left hand corner of the screen to return to your BRIAN profile home page.

If you have any queries about BRIAN, please contact BRIAN@bournemouth.ac.uk/.  If you require help assessing whether an open access version of your work can be contributed to BURO please contact your Subject Library Team or SAS-BURO@bournemouth.ac.uk.

Definitions of BRIAN and BURO

Clarification is required of what BRIAN is and what BURO now does.

BRIAN

BRIAN (Bournemouth Research Information And Networking) is BU’s publication management system.  Staff can manage their research outputs on BRIAN, as well as other information such as biography, academic group, memberships, website and social media links, plus many more options.  Information input to BRIAN will be displayed in the BU staff profile web pages.  BRIAN enables a single point of data entry which will enable research information to be used in multiple places.  It will also enable BU to meet Research Excellence Framework (REF) requirements by improving administrative efficiency and data accuracy.  All academic staff automatically have a login and you can access it with your normal university username and password (you don’t need to add staff\ in front of your username).  Help and guidance can be found on the system and via the documents below.  If you have any problems accessing the system or you have any queries please contact BRIAN@bournemouth.ac.uk

If you require any help with BRIAN, please contact BRIAN@bournemouth.ac.uk

BURO

Bournemouth University Research Online [BURO] is the University’s Institutional Repository. BURO is supported by Eprints software. It gives access to academic outputs created by Bournemouth University staff and researchers. Where available BURO contains open access full text of unpublished works (pre-prints) and the author’s version of published works (post-prints).  BURO is located at http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk – it has a well-designed interface and is easy to use. BURO is open to anyone to search, however, only Bournemouth University staff and researchers can contribute material.  Material is contributed to BURO via BRIAN.  BURO contains records of outputs with full-text attached – a full list of outputs can be viewed in the BU staff profile web pages http://staffprofiles.bournemouth.ac.uk/.

If you require help assessing whether an open access version of your work can be contributed to BURO please contact your Subject Library Team or SAS-BURO@bournemouth.ac.uk .

I will shortly be updating the FAQ’s for BRIAN and so watch this space.

BURO Stats – who’s downloading your open access research?

What’s your impact?  Did you know that you can access statistics for your open access research outputs in BURO?

Simply go to BURO, browse your items by author and view a variety of statistics about your individual full text research outputs, including:-

  • Number of full text downloads (daily and monthly)
  • Top ten search terms that led people to your research
  • Number of unique visitors

To run a variety of other searches on your research outputs use the BURO IRStats Dashboard

Remember – to add your full text items to BURO you need to submit them via BRIAN.

 

 

BRIAN – Full Text items in BURO now accessible

All full text articles in BURO can now be accessed via BRIAN.  You can view these via the ‘Full Text’ tab within your BRIAN publications screen.  Where there is a full text article for a publication, a number will appear on the tab, i.e. ‘Full Text (1)’.

In order to comply with BU’s Academic Publications Policy on Open Access, academics are responsible for uploading their research outputs, including full text articles. See page 5 of BRIAN – Quick Start Guide v1 to see how to deposit full text articles into BURO via BRIAN.  For further information on the publications policy, please contact the BURO staff.