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Only 4 Weeks to Go! Annual Postgraduate Conference Abstract Deadline.

Doctoral College – 10th Annual Postgraduate Conference

Are you a PGR or do you know a PGR looking for an opportunity to share their research with peers and academic colleagues? If so, then the 10th Annual Postgraduate Conference hosted by the Doctoral College is the opportunity for you.


With only 4 weeks do go The 10th Annual Postgraduate Conference abstract deadline is soon approaching. BU PGRs are invited to submit oral, poster or photography abstract to pgconference@bournemouth.ac.uk by Thursday 4 January 2018 in order to be considered.  

Please ensure you follow the how to apply guidance (pdf 253kb) and you can download the Application Form (docx 545kb) here.


Oral Presentation: 1st Prize £150;   2nd Prize £100;   3rd Prize £75
Poster Presentation: 1st Prize £100;   2nd Prize £75;   3rd Prize £50
Photo Presentation: Winner £50

*All prizes will be in the form of Amazon Vouchers


Successful oral presentations will be supported by a one day masterclass in presentation skills and successful poster presentations will be supported by a masterclass in creating an academic poster.


Registration to attend the conference will open on Monday 8 January 2018.

Brexit

My inaugural lecture on
‘The effects of Brexit on the EU, the UK and Dorset – a migrant’s account’
can be found here:

https://twitter.com/bournemouthuni?lang=en

Posted by Bournemouth University on Wednesday, 18 October 2017

https://ideas.repec.org/s/bam/wpaper.html

CQR Lunchtime Seminar “Poetry as Research” Wed RLH 201 1pm

The Centre for Qualitative Research invites you to its continuing series of lunchtime seminars this Wednesday at 1 pm in RLH 201 for “Poetry as Research” “In Conversation” with Lee-Ann Fenge and Wendy Cutts.

This year’s theme is “LISTEN MAKE SHARE”. Each month two CQR members  present their experiences to the audience ‘in conversation’ with either Narrative Methods (listening to stories), Arts-based Research methods (making stories), or Dissemination methods (sharing stories).

The seminars will involve two conversants and plenty of opportunity for audience participation in listening, making, and sharing. Not lectures, the seminars consist of two presenters ‘In Conversation” about a topic or method. There will be no PPT, but plenty of time for audience interaction and feedback!

Come along and join ‘In Conversation’!

Wed. 1 pm RLH 201 “Poetry as Research” with Lee-Ann Fenge & Wendy Cutts

Comrades and Curators by Professor Julian McDougall

I saw that the lanternist indulges in transformations, in magical transformations and I saw him transforming himself …. the transforming showman. (A Conversation with Bill Douglas, Bridport Film Society, 1987).

 

The research I am working on with The Bill Douglas Museum concerns Bill Douglas’ film Comrades, representing the story of the Tolpuddle Martys, with a magic lanternist character telling the story. My academic ‘angle’ is to trace ‘third spaces’ in and around Comrades, an idea so far not presented, to my knowledge, by either the director, film commentators, or academics.

The place of the Tolpuldde story in British social history has a particular resonance with me, for personal and political reasons. I spend a lot of time in the Dorset region and attend the Tolpuddle Festival every year, which homours the martyrs as the beginnings of the trade union movement in Britain. In my youth I spent time on Miners’ picket lines. I’m now a media adademic. So the film brings together my personal, political and professional ‘selves’ and the role of the lanternist in the narrative adds another layer to this.

When I saw the research stipend advertised, I wondered if my interest in Bill Douglas’ film, Comrades, would be a little peripheral to the museum’s research focus. Whilst the film features a magic lanternist and was directed by the museum’s benefactor, I assumed that researchers specializing in all of his work (and particularly his better known ‘My Childhood’ trilogy) or in the pre-cinema artefacts housed in the Exeter museum, would be more central to the work of the museum and the University. Fortunately the museum is keen to explore all aspects of Bill’s work as well as his copllection and has a full productrion archive on Comrades, which they see as key to his career. So I was thrilled to receive the stipend and, whilst I am still no specialist in optics, spending time with the collection is adding a new dimension to my research, as so often happens.

This third space idea comes from several theorists, including Bhabha (1994) and I’ve recently published a book (with John Potter) on digital third spaces in education. It’s quite a simple idea, really – it’s a space in between other spaces. It can be a real place or a way of thinking, but the important thing is that it’s transformative – it sets up new ideas. For this research, I’m combining physical locations (museums) and ways of seeing and thinking about history and politics, through and with film.

So, with this as my theoretical approach, I’m exploring the ‘in between’ relationship between four things (although it’s increasing as I visit the collection and carry out interviews, so it could be more). First, Comrades as a film. Second, the curation of the director’s collection of magic lanterns and other optical artefacts at the museum in Exeter. Third, the role of the magic lanternist character in Comrades as pivotal to the representation of social history in the film. And fourth, the curation of this social history in other museums in Tolpuddle (the Martyrs’ Museum itself) and Dorchester (the Shire Hall living history project).

So my thinking about Comrades in the context of the Bill Douglas collection, the curational narrative of the Tolpuddle Martyr’s Museum (and its annual TUC festival) and the social history project housed in Shire Hall, Dorchester set ups another third space, between politics, film, art and physical objects. When I visit the museum (twice so far), I spend time mainly with the objects and Peter Jewell’s research notes. I’m interested in the contextual archives – press cuttings, shooting scripts, financial records, but for the research itself it’s the interplay of thinking about history – of cinema and of people (in Unions) that I’m immersed in. But the physical objects are also texts, so I see a magic lantern donated by Bill and a pamphlet about the Martyrs that Peter acquired in a shop in London in the same way.

The Lapierre magic lemtern belonging to Bill and Peter’s collection, which was used in Comrades.

Perhaps not being a pre-cinema scholar nor a historian gives me a different way of looking at these things. My project is a media audience study, building on mixed methods approaches I’ve used on work with The Wire and Benefits Street. But my own thinking, as I visit the museum and read the materials in the collection, is progressing from thinking about the lanternist as a narrative device (nothing new there) to understanding the hope (probably unrealized) for cinema to democratize representation ‘for the people’ and the advent of trade unions as being impossible to re-create / curate neutrally. In other words, could these stories be told without politics? 

So far I have made two visits to the museum. The first trip was devoted to exploring the collection and being with the artefacts. The second included interviewing Phil Wickham and Peter Jewell about historical and political narratives in both Comrades and Phil’s curation. Following these visits, I interviewed Tom de Wit, curator of the Tolpuddle Martyrs Museum and I ran a workshop at the Tolpuddle Festival with the Radical Film Network, during which participants drew ‘maps’ of each others’ engagements with films, history and politics in the same way as I’m doing with Comrades. Getting people to draw maps, or other visual representations of the connections they make, helps us understand how our interpretations of films can bring to life history, politics and our own personal life stories.

Workshop at the Tolpuddle Festival

For me, Comrades sits in a space between my own political views and trade unionism, some deeply personal things to do with my late father, my working life and then the connection between all of those in my current geographical location when I’m at work. When I ask people to choose a film with political and historical meaning for them and then think about similar connections, usually they come up with rich, deep and personal stories. I use some ‘distancing’ techniques, putting people together in pairs and then groups, so that by the time they share their stories, they are combined into themes arising from several people. Then, with people’s consent, I photograph the ‘maps’ and use them as data for the research.

Next, I’ll be visiting the Shire Hall in Dorchester and finally bringing the curators from the three museums together for a discussion and another ‘mapping’ exercise back at the Bill Douglas Museum. Following that, I’ll be presenting the findings at conferences and writing up for a journal – whether my findings will be something I can generalize about – ie whether I find something out about films, history, politics and people more broadly, or whether what I discover is more specific to Comrades is, is at moment in time a ‘known unknown’.

Young Life Scientists’ symposium: Frontiers in Musculoskeletal Health, Ageing and Disease

The past Saturday I was given the opportunity to present my pilot study titled “The influence of inspiratory muscle training on balance and functional mobility in healthy older adults” at the Young Life Scientists Symposium (YLS) held in Derby (see related poster).

 

Purpose of the pilot was to gain an understanding of the effect of 8 weeks inspiratory muscle training upon balance and functional mobility outcomes (including Five-Sit-To-Stand, Time Up and Go, Mini-Best test and others) in older adults (65 and over). The results have led to a double-blind random control trial which will be completed by the beginning of 2018.

The YLS is organised by PhD students and Post-Doc’s for other PhD students and early career researchers it aims to give the opportunity to network and discuss research matters via poster and oral communication in a positive and constructive environment.
This year symposium was focusing on three major sections: nutrition, exercises for ageing and metabolic disease in ageing. Speakers from all the UK discussed their works, and I had the chance to collect feedbacks explaining my methods and methodology.

I would like to thank Bournemouth University and my supervisors who helped me to achieve this opportunity.

Thank you for reading.
Francesco.

 

Research Staff Association coffee morning 29/11/17 – theme career pathways

The next BU Research Staff Association coffee morning will take place on the 29th November, 10-11 am in F105, Fusion, Talbot Campus. The focus is on career pathways for researchers within and outside of academia. These coffee morning are open to all staff at BU, and we particularly welcome those on research specific contracts including PGRs.

We are delighted to welcome guest speaker Penny Ballyntyne, Careers Adviser, BU Careers Service to share her knowledge and experience in this area.

We look forward to seeing you there.

BU Research Staff Association

 

ADRC present INSCCOPe project poster at BAPEN 2017 Annual Conference

ADRC Post-doctoral Research Fellow Dr. Mike Bracher presents INSCCOPe baseline findings at the 2017 BAPEN Annual Conference Poster session.

The Ageing and Dementia Research Centre (ADRC)’s Dr. Mike Bracher presented initial findings from baseline data collection for the INSCCOPe (Implementing Nutrition Screening in Community Care for Older People) project, at the poster session of the 2017 BAPEN Annual Conference (22nd November 2017).

Led by ADRC co-lead Professor Jane Murphy, the project aims to improve screening and treatment of malnutrition for older people in the community, by exploring how best to implement service improvements for nutrition screening and treatment for malnutrition in older people.

The aim is to maximise scalability and cost effectiveness of a new procedure for screening and treatment of malnutrition in the community, by providing an evidence base to support implementation across wider settings within the health service.

ADRC co-lead Prof. Jane Murphy (left), Wessex AHSN Senior Programme Manager Kathy Wallis (centre), and Wessex AHSN Teaching and Research Fellow Dr. Emma Parsons (right) showcase INSCCOPe and other projects within the AHSN’s Nutrition in Older People Programme at the 2017 BAPEN Annual Conference.

At baseline (T0), the project (using a combination of questionnaires and telephone interviews) demonstrated:

  • strong support for, and value placed upon, nutrition screening and treatment activity by participants;
  • ambivalence / doubt with respect to current logistical and organisational support for screening and treatment related activity.

Work is currently underway to implement suggested changes to implementation of the procedure identified from data collected at T1 (two months following implementation of the new procedure through training sessions with staff).

Following this, the third and final data collection point (T2 – 8 months following completion of training) will take place, after which the project will be evaluated. If successful, findings from the INSCCOPe project will inform rollout of the new procedure across Southern Health NHS Foundation Trust.

Click here to view/download the poster

or

Click here to go to the INSCCOPe project page

 

Migration research at BU: New migrant workers’ paper published

Two days ago saw the publication of the latest paper on migration research here at Bournemouth University. The journal Health Prospect published ‘Risky work: Accidents among Nepalese migrant workers in Malaysia, Qatar and Saudi’ [1]. This new paper is based on the PhD research project conducted by Dr. Pratik Adhikary. Health Prospect is a peer-reviewed Open Access journal, part of Nepal Journals Online (NepJOL) which offers free access to research on and/or from Nepal. The paper is co-authored by former FHSS staff Dr. Zoe Sheppard and Dr. Steve Keen as well as Prof. Edwin van Teijlingen of the Centre for Midwifery, Maternal & Perinatal Health (CMMPH).

Previous academic papers by BU scholars included, amongst others, work on migrant workers from Nepal [2-6], relatives of migrant workers [7], migrant health workers [8-9], migration and tourism [10-11], migrant workers from Eastern Europe [11-13], migration and the media [14] as well as migration in the past [15]. The various strands of work link very well to BU’s application for Leverhulme Doctoral Scholarships.

 

References:

  1. Adhikary, P., Sheppard, Z., Keen, S., van Teijlingen, E. (2017) Risky work: Accidents among Nepalese migrant workers in Malaysia, Qatar and Saudi, Health Prospect 16(2): 3-10.
  2. Adhikary, P., Simkhada, P.P., van Teijlingen E., Raja, AE. (2008) Health & Lifestyle of Nepalese Migrants in the UK BMC International Health & Human Rights 8(6). Web address: www.biomedcentral.com/1472-698X/8/6.
  3. van Teijlingen E, Simkhada, P., Adhikary, P. (2009) Alcohol use among the Nepalese in the UK BMJ Rapid Response: www.bmj.com/cgi/eletters/339/oct20_1/b4028#223451
  4. Adhikary P., Keen S., van Teijlingen, E. (2011) Health Issues among Nepalese migrant workers in Middle East. Health Science Journal 5: 169-175. www.hsj.gr/volume5/issue3/532.pdf
  5. Aryal, N., Regmi, PR., van Teijlingen, E., Simkhada, P., Adhikary, P., Bhatta, YKD., Mann, S. (2016) Injury and Mortality in Young Nepalese Migrant Workers: A Call for Public Health Action. Asian-Pacific Journal of Public Health 28(8): 703-705.
  6. Simkhada, PP., Regmi, PR., van Teijlingen, E., Aryal, N. (2017) Identifying the gaps in Nepalese migrant workers’ health & well-being: A review of the literature, Journal of Travel Medicine 24 (4): 1-9.
  7. Aryal, N., Regmi, PR., van Teijlingen, E., Dhungel, D., Ghale, G., Bhatta, GK. (2016) Knowing is not enough: Migrant workers’ spouses vulnerability to HIV SAARC Journal of Tuberculosis, Lung Diseases & HIV/AIDS 8(1):9-15.
  8. Scammell, J., 2016. Nurse migration and the EU: how are UK nurses prepared? British Journal of Nursing, 25 (13), p. 764.
  9. Sapkota, T., Simkhada, P., van Teijlingen, E. (2014) Nepalese health workers’ migration to United Kingdom: A qualitative study. Health Science Journal 8(1):57-74.
  10. Dwyer, L., Seetaram, N., Forsyth, P., Brian, K. (2014) Is the Migration-Tourism Relationship only about VFR? Annals of Tourism Research, 46: 130-143.
  11. Filimonau, V., Mika, M. (2017) Return labour migration: an exploratory study of Polish migrant workers from the UK hospitality industry. Current Issues in Tourism, 1-22.
  12. Janta, H., Ladkin, A., Brown, L., Lugosi, P., 2011. Employment experiences of Polish migrant workers in the UK hospitality sector. Tourism Management, 32 (5): 1006-1019.
  13. Mai, N., Schwandner-Sievers, S. (2003) Albanian migration and new transnationalisms, Journal of Ethnic & Migration Studies 29(6): 939-948.
  14. Marino, S., Dawes, S., 2016. Fortress Europe: Media, Migration and Borders. Networking Knowledge, 9 (4).
  15. Parker Pearson, M., Richards, C., Allen, M., Payne, A. & Welham, K. (2004) The Stonehenge Riverside project Research design and initial results Journal of Nordic Archaeological Science 14: 45–60

Fake conferences are not fake news: beware predatory conferences

Introduction

Academic have been warned for a decade about predatory Open Access publishers (van Teijlingen 2014). These are commercial organisations charging academics a publication fee on submission of their manuscripts with a promise to publish their work quickly online. The problem is twofold: first, these commercial organisations don’t offer proper peer-review and editorial quality assurance; and secondly, academic are being tricked into believing the journal is a legitimate scientific publication.  The second author receives on average six to eight invitations a week to publish in this kind of predatory journals – see below for examples. The first author, who despite having not worked in an academic institution for over three years, still receives such invitations to publish in ‘Journal X’.

Predatory conferences

A similar phenomenon to predatory journals is the predatory conference (Moital 2014; Nobes 2017; Grove 2017). These are pretend academic conferences of questionable value, established first and foremost to make money, not for the greater good of the academic discipline.

Both authors have received bogus and legitimate invitations to attend conferences. A predicament with such an invitation, which 99% of time arrives by email, is that it is not easy to distinguish between fake and real offers. For example, the first author recently received an offer (at short notice), to attend a conference in Miami in November 2017 (see below). This was on the back of an editorial he had published couple of months earlier. For a career researcher going from contract to contract, the appeal of being invited to present a keynote at a conference can be flattering, far less an honour and a boost for one’s career. Therefore, while the idea that if it seems too good to be true, is a prudent one to hold; there is also a temptation to follow through.

The author replied to the request quizzing the reason for the invite out of the blue. The answer was less than convincing, and a swift email by the author saying “Don’t tell me… You are offering me a keynote with travel and accommodation… Lol!!” called their bluff and ended correspondence.

But digging a little deeper he found there was a webpage dedicated to taking payments to attend the conference. In the digital world, a fool can be easily and quickly separated from his or her money.

Of course, it may have been a real conference at a real venue, and they really wanted him to speak. But discerning this is not easy at first…

Some of the warning signs/What to look out for

  • The conference email invitation looks very convincing (if not don’t even read it!).
  • The venue is good location as Nobes (2017) highlighted, “the organizers are more interested in marketing the tourist destination rather than the academic value of the conference”.
  • The conference covers too many different aspects or topics, as if the advert is designed to catch the eye of many people as possible who are vaguely connected to the discipline.
  • Mentions on associated predatory journals and ‘important’ organisations in the discipline.
  • Email and bank accounts that don’t look professional/ official.
  • Little mention of attendance fees, but after acceptance emails demanding a high conference fee and other charges.
  • Conference organisers are not academics, or unknown names.
  • Conference does not peer-review submission/ not provide proper editorial control over presentations
  • Signs of copying of names of existing academic conferences or scientific organisation and even copying of their webpages
  • Even more advertising than normal at a scientific conference.

Furthermore, Andy Nobes (2017) offered some helpful advice on quality of the conference websites in the list below. Andy is based at AuthorAID, a global network providing support, mentoring, resources and training for researchers in developing countries.

Who is at risk of falling for predatory conferences?

Academics need to be aware of money-making conferences and meetings without a true commitment to science. But some academics might be more at risk than others. Young researchers, PhD students and fledgling academics, living from contract to contract may feel any conference attendance is a potential career boost. Thus, such an invitation might seem flattering and an opportunity to good to miss. A way to show that he or she is a capable and independent academic.

Final thoughts

Most academics go to conferences for a combination of presenting their work to get critical feedback, making new contacts, sharing ideas and to be inspired. With such broad combination of motivating factors, the exact purpose of conferences is difficult to ascertain because there is no a priori agreed role and value of conferences (Nicolson, 2017a). However, there is evidence that academic conferences function to facilitate commodity transactions, be that knowledge, tools, skills, reputations, or connections, which reflects the neoliberal ethos in the modern academy (Nicolson 2017b). The predatory conference can be viewed in this light, where academia is more and more focused on generating revenue. It is at best scurrilous, and worst, criminal, for organisations to make money using such a confidence trick.  Always check which conferences are organised and advertised by recognised scholarly organisations in your own discipline. If uncertain ask a more experienced academic, a senior colleague or mentor.

 

 

Donald J. Nicolson

(Health Services Researcher, NHS Fife, and Independent Scholar; twitter @_mopster )

Edwin R. van Teijlingen

(Centre Midwifery, Maternal & Perinatal Health)

 

References:

Moital, M. (2014) Ten Signs of a Bogus/Fake Conference.

Grove, J. (2017) Predatory conferences ‘now outnumber official scholarly events’  (26th Oct.)

Nicolson, D.J. (2017a) Do conference presentations impact beyond the conference venue? Journal of Research in Nursing. 22(5), pp.422-425.

Nicolson, D.J. (2017b) Academic Conferences as Neoliberal Commodities, Palgrave Macmillan

Nobes, A. (2017) What are ‘predatory’ conferences and how can I avoid them?

van Teijlingen, E. (2014) Beware of rogue journals.

 

New paper by BU’s Lecturer in International Health

Congratulations to Dr. Pramod Regmi on the publication of his latest article ‘Local elections and community health care in Nepal’.[1]  Pramod is our newly appointed Lecturer in International Health, who started this post exactly a month ago.  The editorial, co-authored with BU Visiting Faculty Prof. Padam Simkhada (based at Liverpool John Moores University), Nirmal Aryal (based at the University of Otago, New Zealand) and CMMPH’s Prof. Edwin van Teijlingen, highlights the important link between local democracy and health in Nepal.

The paper argues that elected local governments are critical for public accountability on the operationalization of the SDGs (Sustainable Development Goals) at local level.  Furthermore, having elected leaders in communities after such a long gap will certainly give Nepalese people rights and hopefully improve provision and access to health care services they are entitled to. Thus the role of civil society, community-based non-governmental organisation, development partners and the mass-media is critical in both advocacy for, and the effective monitoring and implementation of, local activities.

The paper appeared today in Health Prospect an Open Access journal published in English in Nepal as part of the Nepal Journals Online (NepJOL) service .

 

Reference

  1. Regmi, P., van Teijlingen, E., Simkhada, P., Aryal, N. (2017) Local elections and community health care in Nepal, Health Prospect: Journal of Public Health, 16(2):1-2.

Handbook of Arts-based Research

Pleased to announce that a copy of the Handbook of Arts-based Research, Patricia Leavy, Editor, is now available at Bournemouth University’s Lansdowne Library, but also available electronically online.  The compendium includes a Chapter, “Research as Film, Film as Research” by FMC’s Trevor Hearing and FHSS’ Kip Jones.

Bringing together interdisciplinary leaders in methodology and arts-based research (ABR), this comprehensive handbook explores the synergies between artistic and research practices and addresses issues in designing, implementing, evaluating, and publishing ABR studies.
This is a welcome addition for faculty and students with an interest in the use of the arts in research and/or dissemination.

Brightspace focus group

If your students have been using Brightspace this academic year, then BU’s Marketing & Communications Department would like to hear from them to find out what’s been good, what hasn’t, how it can be made better.

A discussion group is taking place at 12pm on Tuesday 28 November on Talbot Campus for an hour and as a thank you, students will be treated to some pizza.

All students at BU will be moving from myBU to Brightspace next September so their feedback will be really useful in making sure Brightspace meets the needs of our students. Responses will be kept anonymous.

If any of your students would like to take part, please email the project team with their course name and year of study, and they’ll be in touch with more details.