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Doctoral College Newsletter | June 2020

The Doctoral College Newsletter provides termly information and updates to all those involved with postgraduate research at BU. The latest edition is now available to download here. Click on the web-links provided to learn more about the news, events and opportunities that may interest you.

If you would like to make a contribution to future newsletters, please contact the Doctoral College.

PGR Virtual Poster Showcase | Varshini Nandakumar

Center stage this week in the PGR Virtual Poster Showcase:

Varshini Nandakumar, PhD student in the Faculty of Science & Technology with this poster entitled:

‘Design of a functional electrical stimulation device adaptive to walking.’

Click the poster below to enlarge.

Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) is a neuro-rehabilitation technique commonly used to aid walking in individuals suffering from Drop Foot (DF), a condition that limits ankle dorsiflexion leading to drag the foot while walking. FES devices make use of small electrical pulses to generate functional muscle contraction, enabling dorsiflexion to overcome DF. Existing FES devices are aiding mobility significantly, but one limitation in them is the inefficacy to allow the user to walk confidently in different walking scenarios. As reported by users, this is caused due to the inability to lift their foot sufficiently to ambulate on different walking scenarios. Hence this project proposes to overcome this limitation using machine learning algorithms to develop a predictive model to identify steps, ramps, and kerbs. The output of this model will then be used to control the stimulation levels to provide sufficient stimulation to enable the user to overcome the obstacle.


If this research has inspired you and you’d like to explore applying for a research degree please visit the postgraduate research web pages or contact our dedicated admissions team.

Looking through the lens of Covid-19 at student risk management practice in HE

Earlier this year the International Journal for Creative Media Research (IJCMR) published a journal article by Annie East, Deputy Head of Media Production Department at BU, on ways students make meaning of the risk assessment process on their undergraduate filmmaking degree. Based on Annie’s doctoral pilot study findings, this article, whilst written in a pre-covid19 environment, has 5 areas for consideration of health and safety going forward in a Covid-19 student fieldwork context. Below Annie considers how we conceive health, safety and risk before outlining 5 points.

What is safe? The social construction of safety

Safety is a subjective, constructed and socially derived notion. The Health And Safety Executive literature does not define what safety is, leaving companies and organisations to interpret or translate how that applies to their practices. Similarly risks are ‘selected’ and ‘risk is only what people choose to say it is.’ As for health, we follow current advice in how to understand what is ‘good health’.

To give more clarity we could consider the terms ‘health’ and ‘safety’ from within the industrial context in which they are being used. Since my research is about filmmaking (in an HE context), when we refer to safety at work we can consider a film set in a studio; a lighting electrician may fall off a ladder that isn’t secure and this is a result of non-safety, or ‘unsafe-ness’. When we talk about health we can view the same studio where a set designer is carrying heavy props and as a result of that act, potentially, over time, this will create health problems, linked to heavy lifting, for that person. Safety is therefore constructed by us with an immediacy, whether perceived as safe or unsafe, and health is constructed as more removed from the act, alluding to future constructs of ailment/s within the body (or mind).

So with a socially constructed definition of health and safety the linked article can be read, taking into account the added consideration of working practice and Covid19 outlined in 5 points below.

1. VR Elicitation

In the article I propose a new research method; VR elicitation. A two-tier practice of placing a 360-degree camera into fieldwork (in this case a student film shoot) and then viewing it back as a way of deepening reflective and reflexive practice for both educator and student through an immersive environment. In response to innovation around education during Covid-19, VR elicitation could be utilised to enhance, learning for students who may not be able to engage as fully with fieldwork. This would be through remote learning ‘in the round’ with peers and educators taking advantage of the immersive environment. Working with apps that can download onto smartphones and be slotted into a £30 VR visor.

Image 1: Student film shoot

Image 2: Re-immersion back into film shoot; VR elicitation

2. The paradox within HE

The article highlights the paradoxical nature of working in a tripartite environment; education that teaches industry practice whilst complying with HE rules. With the extra layer of Covid-19 risk management incorporated into our health and safety practices, it is worth fully understanding the paradox presented within the article.

3. Risk as imagined, risk as performed

Following David Borys, I conceived the risk assessment in two steps; risk as imagined (the writing of a risk assessment) and risk as performed (the performance of the risk assessment in action). The literature acknowledges a lack of emphasis on risk as performed in scholarly research discoveries or, if it does, it discovers performance as being different to that as imagined.

4. Working beyond bureaucracy in risk management

The article posits holistic ways to approach risk management that involves engaging HE students more thoroughly. Moving us away from purely bureaucratic tick box exercises of writing a risk assessment towards a shared ownership of risk management strategy or otherwise referred to as ‘institutional magic’ by Patrick Brown. This holism is essential now that we are dealing with an invisible risk.

5. VR elicitation study findings

The pilot study teases out some of the ways students inherently keep themselves safe and are examples of where the imagined is very different to the performance. This reminds us of the importance of developing shared ownership of managing risk rather than staying purely with top-down implementation that is tied to institutional and legal power structures.

Moving forward it will be interesting to see if the increased scrutiny on Covid-19 health & safety risk management within HE results in safer student practice on a film location (or other generic fieldwork) or whether increased scrutiny on Covid-19 results in a lowering of the other health & safety practice principles.

Full linked article here.

Contact: Annie East, Deputy Head Media Production Department, Faculty of Media and Communication. aeast@bournemouth.ac.uk

Doctorate via Centre of Excellence for Media Practice (CEMP).

 

New additions to the Research Skills Toolkit – Starring BU Academics

Research Skills Toolkit for PGRs

Postgraduate researchers have access to a suite of online modules as part of the Research Skills Toolkit developed by Epigeum.

I am please to announce we have now added an updated version of the Literature Review Programme, now named Undertaking a Literature Review and the BRAND NEW Principles of Research Methods, starring Dr Sally Reynolds and Professor Edwin van Teijlingen both of whom also deliver workshops as part of the Doctoral College Researcher Development Programme.

Postgraduate researchers can access these modules via the Researcher Development Programme unit on Brightspace following the instructions for creating an account on Epigeum. On here you will also have access to extensive modules covering:

  • Introduction to Research Skills
  • Research Methods
  • Principles of Research Methods
  • Research Ethics
  • Transferable Skills
  • Entrepreneurship in the Research Context

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to get in touch – Natalie Stewart (Research Skills & Development Officer). 

 

 

 

 

PGR Virtual Poster Showcase | Chris Williams

Still plenty to share in this PGR Virtual Poster Showcase:

Chris Williams, PhD student in the Faculty of Management with this poster entitled:

‘Accreditation of higher education in the UK: The rise of PSRBs & potential influence.’

Click the poster below to enlarge.

This poster will provide a graphical illustration and analysis of data collected as part of my PhD. The data collected identifies when Professional, Statutory and Regulatory Bodies (PSRB’s) that accredit UK undergraduate degrees began their accreditation programmes. PSRB’s were identified from data held by the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) and contacted individually to establish when they began accrediting, leading to the collation of a unique set of figures. HESA’s data is used as part of the Key Information Set (KIS) that HE institutions display on their web pages and other printed material. The information is also held by the Office for Students (OfS), the independent regulator of HE in the UK. Further, the poster identifies key events impacting the UK HE sector and provides a brief analysis of any correlation with the commencement of the accreditation schemes that responded.

 


If this research has inspired you and you’d like to explore applying for a research degree please visit the postgraduate research web pages or contact our dedicated admissions team.

[NEW] Sector Resource Guide to Online Supervision: A Guide for Research Supervisors

Guide to Online Supervision

As part of the UK Council for Graduate Education’s continued support for research supervisors during the covid-19 pandemic, they have published a Guide to Online Supervision.

The guide shares the benefits of online supervising, outlines the issues and challenges for supervisors and postgraduate researchers, and suggests strategies and practices for supervisors to consider when working with postgraduate researchers engaged in research at a distance.

Webinar: Effective Practices in Supervising Doctoral Candidates at a Distance 

In case you missed the hugely popular UKCGE webinar [56:10 mins] sharing good practices in remote supervision the recording can be found on their YouTube channel.

We hope these resources prove helpful to you.

PGR Virtual Poster Showcase | Hina Tariq

Next up in the PGR Virtual Poster Showcase:

Hina Tariq, PhD student in the Faculty of Health & Social Sciences with this poster entitled:

‘Validation of contracture assessment screening tool.’

Click the poster below to enlarge.

Contractures are a debilitating consequence of prolonged immobility potentially leading to physical impairments, limited functional mobility, decreased independence with everyday activities, and reduced social participation. There is no standard assessment tool available to assess the risk of contracture development or progression. The Contracture Assessment Screening Tool (CAST) was developed by Dorset Health Care University NHS Foundation Trust to address this gap. This project aims to establish the 1) CAST validity and 2) CAST effectiveness in reducing contracture development and progression. Timely identification of those at risk of contracture development or progression may help facilitate contracture prevention and the associated negative sequelae.  To evaluate CAST, a mixed methods approach is being utilised including realist review and evaluation.  Merging different methodologies and a realist approach will provide a unique perspective on CAST validation and use. This project is ongoing and the poster will present the overall methodology and significance of the project.


If this research has inspired you and you’d like to explore applying for a research degree please visit the postgraduate research web pages or contact our dedicated admissions team.

Online Researcher Development Resources for PGRs

As we enter June still in lockdown, I wanted to share some of the online researcher development resources freely available to PGRs.

Virtual Workshops – many of the scheduled RDP sessions are being delivered virtually. In June we have the following virtual sessions taking place:

  • Publishing my research
  • Academic writing
  • Milestone preparation: Viva Voce examination
  • Social media for researchers.

Spaces are available, booking via the Researcher Development Programme. 

Research Skills Toolkit – an online Research Skills Toolkit covering topics such as:

  • Becoming a Researcher
  • Research Methods
  • Disseminating your Research
  • Beyond Research
  • Research Ethics

You will need to set up an account on Epigeum, steps to follow to access the toolkit can be found on the Researcher Development Programme – Online Modules.

Video Arts – Comedy based videos and e-learning covering a range of personal and professional development topics. Personal wellbeing is a topic of huge importance but it is being particularly tested during this pandemic. Video Arts have complied a Micro-Series of content from their Wellbeing Essentials, selecting particularly relevant videos and supporting them with podcasts and other extras. It contains a mixture of videos, e-learning courses, podcasts, trailers and infographics.
Tip: Use the navigation within the e-learning, Brightspace navigation  will take you to the next module. 

Plus much more – you can also access a wider range of external resources via the ‘online content‘ tab on the RDP on Brightspace.

If you have any questions please contact Natalie (Research Skills & Development Officer).

PGR Virtual Poster Showcase | Juliette Hecquet

Taking us into the sixth week of the PGR Virtual Poster Showcase:

Juliette Hecquet, PhD student in the Faculty of Management with this poster entitled:

Exploring yoga as a flow experience: A phenomenological study of contemporary communities.’

Click the poster below to enlarge.

The definition of yoga remains fluid and controversial, creating an oxymoron between the philosophical roots of yoga and physical practice. The majority of published academic research is in medicalised fields; however researchers agree yoga has vast positive outcomes with the potential to be valuable in society.  A lack of clarity exists on what the yoga experience now is, with sparse evidence of, non-medical, qualitative research.  The flow experience and the practice of yoga continue to draws parallel’s from a philosophical standpoint.   Yoga can be regarded as one of the oldest and most systematic methods of producing flow experience but has yet to be researched as one. This interpretative phenomenological research aims to explore the lived yoga experience and the potential flow experience, across contemporary yoga communities.  Videos (vlogs) and in-depth semi-structured interviews will explore the research questions; how yoga participants explain their lived yoga experience and the potential flow experience.


If this research has inspired you and you’d like to explore applying for a research degree please visit the postgraduate research web pages or contact our dedicated admissions team.

PGR Virtual Poster Showcase | Helen Slater

This weeks highlight in the PGR Virtual Poster Showcase:

Helen Slater, PhD student in the Faculty of Science & Technology with this poster from her live exhibition entitled:

‘LEAP voices in the jungle: remote monitoring of forest biodiversity.’

Click the poster below to enlarge.

A major challenge in wildlife conservation is the difficulty of collecting and maintaining robust records of abundance and distribution. Sumatra contains a diverse array of unique animal sounds, since many forest animals use acoustic signals for long range communication; these signals can tell us a great deal about wildlife populations and behaviour. A forest soundscape was recorded in secondary forest in Sumatra, Indonesia, as a tool for rapid biodiversity assessment and to begin building a database of vocal signals for long term monitoring of apes and elephants. A network of custom-built acoustic recorders were deployed, covering both protected secondary forest and smallholder plantations at the forest edge. These data are valuable for biodiversity and population monitoring, as well as hugely effective tools for conservation education. In addition to wildlife research, materials collected from this project are being incorporated into an interactive exhibition to engage young children with nature and conservation.


If this research has inspired you and you’d like to explore applying for a research degree please visit the postgraduate research web pages or contact our dedicated admissions team.

PGR Virtual Poster Showcase | Lara Christ

Fourth in this PGR Virtual Poster Showcase: 

Lara Christ, visiting PhD student in the Faculty of Management with this poster entitled:

‘Nonprofit brand orientation in emerging countries: Antecedents, barriers and outcomes’

Click the poster below to enlarge.

Considering the importance of the nonprofit organizations in emerging countries, the research aims to develop the elements that constitute the nonprofit brand orientation in emerging countries and identify the antecedents, barriers and outcomes of nonprofit brand orientation.  In this way, the recent literature about the concept was analysed and a theoretical model is going to be proposed. The research is going to be realized in four steps: generation of indicators from an exploratory research, grouping of the indicators in factors, confirmation of the factors and test of the proposed model. We expect to produce a measurement scale of nonprofit brand orientation, antecedents, barriers and outcomes in emerging countries. In addition to the theoretical relevance of a new scale of a concept that has not been approached yet in the marketing literature, the project can contribute to the management of social organizations bringing benefits to society as a whole.


If this research has inspired you and you’d like to explore applying for a research degree please visit the postgraduate research web pages or contact our dedicated admissions team.

PGR Virtual Poster Showcase | Francesca Dean

Entering week 3 of the PGR Virtual Poster Showcase

Francesca Dean PhD student in the Faculty of Health & Social Sciences with this poster entitled:

‘Exploring the experiences of sport psychologists working within elite youth football in England.’

Click the poster below to enlarge.

Successful performance in sport requires the execution of advanced psychological skills in both training and competition. Although the importance of sport psychology is now widely acknowledged, there is a need for greater clarity regarding (a) what is actually delivered under the banner of sport psychology, and (b) the needs of those receiving psychological support. One sport which is increasingly focusing on the role of psychological development is football—this is occurring via the English Premier League’s Elite Player Performance Plan. As the first stage of a PhD programme, this study aims to examine the current knowledge and provision of sport psychology services delivered to youth performers within professional football academies in England. Semi-structured interviews will be conducted with six sport psychology practitioners working within professional academies in order to gain insight into their understanding of their role, their perception of (sport) psychology, and their experience of delivering psychology services at the academy level.


If this research has inspired you and you’d like to explore applying for a research degree please visit the postgraduate research web pages or contact our dedicated admissions team.

Research Skills Toolkit for PGRs

Research Skills Masters

PGRs, you have access to an extensive online Research Skills Toolkit covering topics such as:

  • Becoming a Researcher
  • Research Methods
  • Disseminating your Research
  • Beyond Research

You will need to set up an account on the Epigeum system to access, steps to follow to access the courses can be found on the Researcher Development Programme – Online Modules.

If you have any questions please contact Natalie or Enrica – pgrskillsdevelopment@bournemouth.ac.uk. 

Doctoral Supervisors – Free UKCGE Webinar – Friday 1 May, 2pm

Effective Practices in Supervising Doctoral Candidates at a Distance

Online— 2pm Friday 1st May 2020.


As we continue working remotely, UKCGE thought you may appreciate the opportunity to hear from, and put your questions to, experienced research supervisors and an academic developer sharing effective practices in research supervision at a distance.

To that end, they have set up a free-of-charge, 1-hour webinar taking place at 2pm on Friday 1st May 2020.


Register for the Webinar
The webinar will take place online via Zoom. Places are strictly limited – Register your free place here:

https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/


Send them your Questions
If you have any specific questions you would like answering during the webinar, please email them.


If you can’t make it at on the 1st, you can watch the recording of the webinar on YouTube or the UKCGE website.

 

PGR Virtual Poster Showcase | Kelsie Fletcher

Next up in the PGR Virtual Poster Showcase:

Kelsie Fletcher, PhD student in the Faculty of Health & Social Sciences with this poster entitled:

‘The momentum of grounded theory: Nursing research and new perspectives in disaster management’.

Click the poster below to enlarge.

The purpose of this poster is to explore the background of Grounded Theory evolution to its application in disaster management and nursing theoretical development. It will examine why Grounded theory remains popular and useful in developing professional knowledge in healthcare research and, most importantly, why it is the methodology of choice for understanding the experiences of nurses working in a disaster region. Explicit links will be made to offer clarity of its appropriateness in this field of research and this will be enhanced by reflections of the researcher.  Nurses possess a unique opportunity to develop understanding of emergency management, public health and planning, to enhance potential responses to a disaster. Grounded theory aims to support research in subjects with little or no literature available (Charmaz 2014; Birks and Mills 2015). Due to the researcher’s personal experience in disaster management provision, constructivist grounded theory is considered to be the most appropriate.


If this research has inspired you and you’d like to explore applying for a research degree please visit the postgraduate research web pages or contact our dedicated admissions team.

Virtual Workshops for PGRs

As part of the Doctoral College Researcher Development Programme and our commitment to provide ongoing support to our Postgraduate Researchers numerous workshops scheduled for April-May will now be delivered virtually, with a huge thanks to our incredible facilitators.

If you were already booked to attend the face-to-face workshop you do not need to rebook, this has been automatically transferred to the online session.

Sessions include:

Research Data Management

Focus Groups

Developing a Search Strategy & Using Researcher Tools

Developing Research Networks and Collaborations

Managing my Research Project

Interviewing in Semi-Structured Interviews

EndNote for Managing References

Surveys & Questionnaires

Originality & Plagiarism


Details and booking links can be found on the new Virtual Workshops page of the RDP on Brightspace.


If you have any questions please do not hesitate to get in touch. More sessions are also being planned.

 

 

 

 

PGR Virtual Poster Showcase | Festus Adedoyin

Kicking off the PGR Virtual Poster Showcase:

Festus Adedoyin, PhD student in the Faculty of Management with this poster entitled:

Energy consumption, CO2 emissions, and tourist arrivals to small island economies dependent on tourism.’

Click the poster below to enlarge.

In less than two decades, the global tourism industry has overtaken the construction industry as one of the bigger polluters, accounting for up to 8% of global greenhouse gas emissions. Consequently, research into the causal link between emissions and the tourism industry have increased significantly focusing extensively on top earners from the industry. However, few studies have thoroughly assessed this relationship for small island economies dependent on tourism. Hence, this paper aims to investigate the causal relationship between CO2 emissions, real GDP per capita, and the tourism industry. The long-run relationship is investigated using Pooled Mean Group ARDL Model. Prior to this, we conduct the Pedroni and Kao cointegration tests, the ADF-Fisher and Im, Perasan Shin unit root tests. We also examine causality using the Dumitrescu and Hurlin (2012) Panel causality tests. Our study seeks to contribute to the energy-growth-tourism debate as well as the feedback mechanism among the variables.

 


If this research has inspired you and you’d like to explore applying for a research degree please visit the postgraduate research web pages or contact our dedicated admissions team.

COVID-19 funding and research

To support the response to COVID-19 the Research Design Service South West (RDS SW) has put together a useful resource page to help researchers. This includes relevant funding calls as well as more general information about the pandemic.

Don’t forget, your local branch of the NIHR RDS is based within the BU Clinical Research Unit (BUCRU)

The BUCRU/RDS office is currently closed due to Coronavirus.  Staff are still working and able to offer research advice remotely, call us on 01202 961939 or send us an email.