Category / Doctoral College

Research Skills Master Programme from Epigeum

Postgradaute Researchers – did you know you have access to 18 online modules covering topics such as research methods and skills, ethics and career planning?

Epigeum’s Research Skills Master Programme provides postgraduate researchers with a broad range of essential skills.

Access all modules on the Doctoral College: Researcher Development Programme on Brightspace via the online modules tab.

To find out more, watch this short video.

If you have any questions about what is avaiable to you as part of the Researcher Development Programme please contact your Research Skills and Development Officer.

Enter the Innovate UK Funding Zone – by improving your Technical Bid Writing

 

You are invited to a half day technical writing workshop where the art of writing successful grants will be unpacked by a successful bid writer who has won them, spoken with the assessors to learn how to win even more of them, and is almost in daily contact with the funder Innovate UK.

After the workshop attendees will have the opportunity to have a one-to-one session with the bid writer to discuss project ideas and to explore suitable grants.

The workshop is being held on Monday 4th March on the Talbot Campus from 09:30 – 16:30. Booking is essential.

Doctoral Loans

Last month the Doctoral College were in attendance for a UKGCE event. Jamie Chadd – PGR admissions administrator – reports back.

On 28th January I attend a UKGCE workshop at the University of Birmingham focused around the introduction of the new Postgraduate Doctoral Loans offered by the government. The event was well attended considering the forecast of heavy snow in the afternoon, and there was strong representation from a variety of different HEIs.

In attendance were Jon Legg and Charmaine Valente from Student Finance England, which meant the day was a mix of gaining further understanding of the new loans from SFE, alongside providing feedback to them regarding institutional experience of the first academic year the loans had been in place.

I spent the day with staff members from the Universities of East London, Northampton and Kent, and it was interesting to hear their perspective on the loans as well as get a bit of understanding of how they run their PGR services. As you can imagine, the size of the PGR cohorts were all quite different, which meant we had all had varying levels of experience with the loans so far.

The morning covered course and student eligibility for the Doctoral Loans. It was made very clear to us that we should remember that these loans were considered a contribution to costs for PhD students, recognising that £25,000 does not cover the full cost of a doctoral programme. The estimation of take-up for the 2018/19 academic year was 10,300 rising to 12,300 in five years’ time.

We were told in detail the strict eligibility requirements regarding previous levels of study, domicile, and concurrent funding. An important point of clarification was made regarding students who are, or may be, in receipt of Research Council funding – students should only apply for the loan if they have no intention of applying for such funding. If a student should apply for such funding later in their course (after taking out a loan), their eligibility for the loan will cease and they will receive no further payments.

In the afternoon we covered some qualitative research on the impact and perception of the Postgraduate Doctoral loans. Dr Billy Bryan presented some results from his study on how the  loans could change the value of the UK doctorate. This led to some interesting discussions about whether the loans represent an even higher risk for an increasingly risky degree pathway. In groups we also reflected on the aspects of mental health and self-worth for PhD students who were funding themselves via the loan, and if there were potentially undue negative implications post-doctorate for those that loan-funded awards versus those funded via Research Council funding.

Mark Bennet, who is Head of Content at FindAUniversity, presented results from a survey undertaken on the perception of loans, which was run in the summer of 2018 – before the first set of loan-funded students enrolled across the UK. There was a generally positive perception about the loans, with 51% of the 369 respondents predicting the loans would make doctoral study more accessible.

The most distinct trends from the research showed that the most positive perceptions about the loans came from potential part-time students, and from students wanting to study in the Arts & Humanities. This was highly indicative of two things: firstly, the loan was seen to be useful by people who wanted to undertake flexible part-time study, presumably as it also gave them time to work to further assist in funding their doctorate. Secondly – and perhaps unsurprisingly – was the positive response from Humanities students, an area that traditionally offers less in the way of research funding opportunities.

We managed to finish a little early, giving us all time to try and make an earlier train, as the snow was coming thick and fast by now. Reflecting back on the day on the journey home, I’d highlight that it would be difficult to get any real understanding of the impact of the loans until the 2018/19 cohort were in the stage of completing their PhD’s. However, there may be opportunities to ensure we are more transparent and responsible with how we market the loans during the admissions and applications process. There is also a case for tracking how students are funded in greater detail, so that when we produce data on our completion rates or student numbers, we are able to see the impact of the loans more clearly.

If you’ve got any questions about applying for a postgraduate research degree at BU, please email PGRadmissions@bournemouth.ac.uk

Image result for UKCGE IMAGES

 

Living on a low-income during pregnancy – women’s experiences, in high income countries”: scoping review protocol

In conjunction with her supervisory team, led by Professor Ann Hemingway – Prof of Public Health & Wellbeing, Charlotte Clayton, PGR in HSS, has published her literature review protocol, ‘A scoping review exploring the pregnancy, postnatal and maternity care experiences of women from low-income backgrounds, living in high-income countries’, on the Open Science Framework (OSF) website. The OSF is an online, open access platform which gives researchers the opportunity to share their research activities, and provides a platform for the publication of reviews, like scoping reviews, in order to generate open discussion about research and establish wider networking possibilities.

The review protocol is available at: https://osf.io/yb3zq/

The completed review will be submitted to a peer-reviewed midwifery journal, in the spring of 2019 & forms part of her PhD research – which is looking at the pregnancy and postnatal experiences of women from low-income backgrounds and the role of midwifery-led continuity of care in the reduction of maternal health inequalities.

For further information, email: claytonc@bournemouth.ac.uk or @femmidwife on Twitter

(Clayton, C., Hemingway, A., Rawnson, S., and Hughes, M., 2019. A scoping review exploring the pregnancy, postnatal and maternity care experiences of women from low-income backgrounds, living in high-income countries. [online]. Available from: osf.io/yb3zq).

 

 

Another free workshop for postgraduate researchers (presentation skills)

Presentation Skills Workshop

Facilitated by Dr Margaret Collins (Training for Universities)

Date: Tuesday 29 January              Date: Friday 29 March

Time: 09:30 – 16:30                        Time: 09:30 – 16:30

Register Here                                    Register Here

Surveys regularly reveal that public speaking is the most feared business activity and is dreaded even more than death!

Almost every research degree requires you to present your work to colleagues, at meetings, in seminars or at specialist conferences. At conferences, it can also be important to understand how these skills apply to the “business networking” opportunities that present themselves or to have and to use skills to chair a session effectively.

This workshop will begin by exploring the basic components of communication including listening skills, the power of body language, how to make an impact and strategies to hold the attention of your audience.

Participants are invited to deliver a short presentation and to receive coaching and feedback within the supportive workshop environment.

As a result of this workshop participants will:

  •     Understand the contributions of words, voice and body language
  •     Know four essential questions to answer when planning for a meeting
  •     Have structures to plan the content of a presentation
  •     Be clear about strategies to hold the attention of your audience
  •     Be prepared for dealing with questions
  •     Have effective strategies to deal with “presentation stress”

This workshop will be delivered to meet your specific needs.

To see comments from previous participants please visit: https://trainingforuniversities.com/workshops/presentation-skills.

This workshop is part of the wider Doctoral College: Researcher Development Programme.

Free workshop for postgraduate researchers (creative thinking and problem solving)

Creative Thinking and Problem Solving

Facilitated by Dr Margaret Collins (Training for Universities)

Date: Monday 28 January              Date: Thursday 28 March

Time: 13:30 – 16:30                        Time: 13:30 – 16:30

Register Here                                    Register Here

Significant keys to success in research include being able to ask the right question, to interpret the data, to see new patterns, to make links between the not-so-obvious associations. These are skills that are developed to provide new and creative answers to your research challenges.

During this workshop we will develop your ability to ask questions, to think outside the box, to see things differently and generate a wider range of possibilities.

We will use a range of techniques including group discussion, group activities and targeted exercises to develop your creative thinking and problem solving skills.

Do come ready to work on your own research ideas, problems or challenges and be prepared to develop some surprising possibilities.

As a result of this workshop participants will

  • Know the first step to solving a problem is to ask the right question
  • Be able to use a range of techniques for stimulating creative processes
  • Understand how learning styles and behaviour influence creative activity
  • Have techniques to generate ideas and select solutions
  • Access resources for creative thinking, problem solving and decision making

This workshop is part of the wider Doctoral College: Researcher Development Programme.

2019 BU PhD Studentship Competition – Application Deadline Monday 28 January 2019

Call for submission of up to 46 matched funded Postgraduate Research Projects now OPEN

The Doctoral College is delighted to announce the launch of the 2019 BU PhD Studentship Competition, with up to 46 matched funded projects available.

At this stage, Academic Staff are invited to submit proposals for matched funded studentship projects which, if successful, will be advertised to recruit PhD candidates for a September 2019 start.

Full details can be found on the Doctoral College Staff Intranet where the following information can be found:

  • BU PhD Studentship 2019 Allocative Process
  • Studentship Proposal Form
  • Studentship Due Diligence Form
  • Template Matched Funding Guarantee Letter
  • Information leaflet for matched funders

Submission Deadline:

Applications should be submitted to the Doctoral College via email to phdstudentshipcompetition@bournemouth.ac.uk no later than 9am on Monday 28 January 2019.

The Doctoral College will manage the recruitment process along the following timetable:

Doctoral College: Researcher Development Programme

Happy New Year!

The Doctoral College: Researcher Development Programme would like to present its first monthly update of 2019. The RDP is still here for all PGRs and we have over 80 expertly facilitated workshops coming up between now and August to support your research journey and future career endeavours.

As part of this I am still offering RDP Brightspace training to support navigation around the unit to allow you to optimise its offerings.

As part of the RDP PGRs also have access to the UEA webinar series and the brand new Video Arts videos and e-learning courses.

 

If you are a PGR or PGR Supervisor and do not have access to the Researcher Development Programme please contact me and I will add you.

 

To stay up-to-date with regular announcements:

  • Download the free ‘Brightspace Pulse’ app.
  • Subscribe to notifications on the RDP Brightspace.
  • Like the Doctoral College Facebook page for regular news and information.
  • Look out for the Monthly Update for Researcher Development in your inboxes at the beginning of each month.

2019 Good Clinical Practice training dates

Good Clinical Practice, or ‘GCP’, is a requirement for those wishing to work on clinical research projects in a healthcare setting.

GCP is the international ethical, scientific and practical standard to which all clinical research is conducted. By undertaking GCP, you’re able to demonstrate the rights, safety and wellbeing of your research participants are protected, and that the data collected are reliable.

The local dates for the 2019 Good Clinical Practice full day and half day refresher training are now on the Clinical Governance blog!

Get in touch with Research Ethics to find out how to book.

Health Research Authority releases eLearning for student researchers

The HRA have improved the information provided on their website for student researchers and those who support them, in planning to conduct research within the NHS.

The organisation has provided three bite size eLearning modules with a focus on the following topics:

  • Sponsors’ and supervisors’ role in educational research
  • Applying for HRA and HCRW (Health and Care Research Wales) Approval
  • Setting up research sites in England and Wales.

You can see the update here, and access the modules here.

Remember that support is on offer at BU if you are thinking of introducing your research ideas into the NHS – email the Research Ethics mailbox, and take a look at the Clinical Governance blog.

TODAY: PGR Live Exhibition – All Welcome

Wednesday 5 December | 13:00 – 16:00 | K103 Kimmeridge House | Talbot Campus

Drop-in to discover this unique display of research being undertaken by our postgraduate researchers. Interact with live displays, listen to recordings and explore a wealth of research posters and photographs.

What’s on display?

The Doctoral College look forward to seeing you there.

#PGRLE18

 

2019 BU PhD Studentship Competition

Call for submission of up to 46 matched funded Postgraduate Research Projects now OPEN

The Doctoral College is delighted to announce the launch of the 2019 BU PhD Studentship Competition, with up to 46 matched funded projects available.

At this stage, Academic Staff are invited to submit proposals for matched funded studentship projects which, if successful, will be advertised to recruit PhD candidates for a September 2019 start.

Full details can be found on the Doctoral College Staff Intranet where the following information can be found:

  • BU PhD Studentship 2019 Allocative Process
  • Studentship Proposal Form
  • Studentship Due Diligence Form
  • Template Matched Funding Guarantee Letter
  • Information leaflet for matched funders

Submission Deadline:

Applications should be submitted to the Doctoral College via email to phdstudentshipcompetition@bournemouth.ac.uk no later than 9am on Monday 28 January 2019.

The Doctoral College will manage the recruitment process along the following timetable: