Tagged / Science and Technology

Challenge Led Applied Systems Programme (CLASP) DEADLINE: 7/11/17

The Science & Technology Facilities Council (STFC) External Innovations are running a Challenge Led Applied Systems Programme (CLASP) to aid with the commercialisation of STFC research in key global challenge areas within the healthcare sector.

Key Priority areas include:

  • Informatics and Computing for Physical and Mental Health
  • Early diagnosis and disease detection
  • Remote patient monitoring
  • Cancer Treatment

Applicants will need to demonstrate that they are working closely with industry and clinicians as well as prepare a full business plan.  Please note, lead applicants must be employed within a Research Organisation group previously or currently funded by the STFC core Science Programme.

The closing date for outline applications will be at 16:00 on 7 November 2017.

For those wishing to prepare an application to this funding call please contact your relevant faculty Funding Development Officer.

 

 

The ceremonial landscapes and funerary monuments of southern Britain

Following a successful application to the Fusion Investment Fund I have been awarded a period of Study Leave, to move on a body of research to publication. Under the umbrella title of ‘ The ceremonial landscapes and funerary monuments of southern Britain’ I will be bringing together material from seven seasons of archaeological field work focussed upon the later Neolithic and Early Bronze Age monuments found in the Allen Valley on Cranborne Chase in east Dorset. The cluster of henge monuments at Knowlton and a dense concentration of round barrows associated with them have been an important factor associated with my research interests since 1994. This grouping of broadly contemporary archaeological monuments has up until recently been under explored even though the importance of the group it can be argued is on a par with better known ceremonial complexes such as  those at Stonehenge, Avebury and Orkney.

Amongst the discoveries made during the fieldwork was the discovery of a late Neolithic house, one of the most complete examples thus far discovered in the UK and an unusual mortuary complex which offers important and exciting new insights into the burial ritual and practices at the beginning of the 2nd millennia BC.

The study leave period will be starting in the late summer and I am very much looking forward to the dedicated space and time so necessay to bring together this large body of work.

Excavations at High Lea Farm 2007 ( Early Bronze Age Barrow and later Saxon cemetery)