Category / Impact

Ways of Seeing Sport Coaching Violence – a unique interactive installation

On Monday 4th November 2019, as part of the ESRC festival of social science, Dr Emma Kavanagh and Dr Adi Adams (Faculty of Management) alongside final year sport student Terri Harvey, curated and hosted an arts based installation to showcase their research on inter-personal violence in sport. The event adopted an innovative, immersive, sensory art-based method not traditionally utilised in sport coach education (but widely used in other ‘caring’ professions) to bring their research knowledge to life and allow coaches and other practitioners to engage with data in a dynamic manner. This was achieved through re-presenting research data collected by the BU academics in audio and visual forms.

Abuse, intimidation and violence in sport and coaching remains a significant global problem. In 2017 the British Government published the Duty of Care in Sport Review, sharing the findings of a critical inquiry into the culture and climate of elite sport in the United Kingdom. High performance sport came under significant scrutiny linked to a number of high profile accounts in the media that raised serious questions concerning the safety of elite sporting spaces and the threats they can pose to athlete welfare. Allegations of bullying, racial, sexual and gender abuse alongside other forms of discrimination have been made across Olympic and Paralympic sports. This ESRC event provided an opportunity to engage practitioners in debates surrounding the safety of sporting spaces as a way of promoting the duty of care in practice.

The event brought to life qualitative social science research data, currently available to academics through peer-reviewed journal articles through the production of an immersive arts-based installation. The data was used to enable those who attended to see/hear/feel and confront the contemporary issue of inter-personal violence in the world of sport coaching, from the perspective of ‘others’. The event aimed to bring sport coaches (and other practitioners) together around a shared concern/problem in the sport industry, with the aim of inspiring awareness, understanding, empathy, care and practical solutions to reducing interpersonal-violence. An arts and media-based approach is often adopted in the education of other ‘caring’ professions engaged in complex, difficult, ‘social’ and emotional work (e.g. nurses, medical practitioners, social workers, palliative care workers), yet has gained limited application in the sporting profession.

 

The event attracted significant attention from external practitioners, students and local organisations. Participants moved around and shared the immersive space with others, experiencing the ‘felt difficulty’ (Trevelyan et al., 2014) of ‘what it feels like’ to experience violence and intimidation as a participant in sport. It is anticipated that experiencing this ‘felt difficulty’, provoked by engaging with material that is ‘perplexing’ or ‘disorientating’ has the potential to provide a platform for coaches to reflect authentically on and transform their own practice. The impact of attending the installation is currently the topic of Terri’s dissertation and the team are excited to understand more about how participants experienced the event.

The event would not have been a success without the support of the ESRC team and, in particular, Adam Morris who helped drive the installation forward. In addition, thanks goes to the sport students who volunteered on the evening and actively engaged in the project through ‘becoming voices’. All of these people shared one passion; making sport a safer space for all those who participate in it.

The Research Impact Fund is open for applications

Demonstrating impact is becoming an increasingly normal part of academic life, with changes in the external environment underpinning the need to show how research is making a difference beyond academia. As well as forming a significant part of a university’s REF submission, impact pathways are often included as a routine part of funding applications.

In order to support impact development at Bournemouth University, an impact fund was established in spring 2019, overseen by the Research Impact Funding Panel.

For 2019/20, the Research Impact Fund has been split into three strands with a total of £50,000 available:

  • Strand 1: To support the development of new research partnerships and networks, to lay the groundwork for future research projects
  • Strand 2: To provide support for emerging impact from existing underpinning research
  • Strand 3: For the development of impact case studies for REF2021 – now closed

We are pleased to announce another open call for applications for strands 1 and 2.

The first call for applications for strands 1 and 2 resulted in eight successful awards, which are currently underway.  The outcomes of the second call for applications for strand 3 are due to be announced soon.

Eligibility

Strand 1: To support the development of new research partnerships and networks, to lay the groundwork for future research projects
This strand is aimed at those who are new to research (academic staff who have not published an academic output, or received internal or external funding for research) such as Early Career Researchers (those who are within 7 years of completing their doctorate, or equivalent experience, and are not Associate Professors / Professors). The funding aims to support colleagues to engage with key stakeholders at the very beginning of the research process, to establish partnerships and networks to support the co-creation of research questions.

There is £11,000 available in total for this funding strand.  From this £11,000, the panel hope to fund multiple projects and would particularly welcome applications for smaller projects up to £2,500.  

Strand 2: To provide support for emerging impact from existing underpinning research
This strand is aimed at academic staff who have evidence of existing underpinning research which has the potential for impact, or is starting to result in impact.  The funding aims to support the development of research impact across BU and begin to identify potential case studies for post-REF2021 exercises.

There is £5,000 available in total for this funding strand.  From this £5,000 the panel hope to fund multiple projects and would particularly welcome applications for smaller projects up to £2,500.  

Application process

To apply, please read the policy, application form and guidance. Applications must be submitted to researchimpact@bournemouth.ac.uk by 5pm on Thursday 12 December.

 If you have any questions about your application please email either Rachel Bowen (for HSS or FM queries) or Genna del Rosa (for FMC or SciTech queries).

Support for applicants

The Panel strongly recommends that applicants speak with their Faculty Impact Officer and/or relevant Unit of Assessment leads / impact champions prior to applying.  If you are unsure who this is, please contact your Faculty Impact Officer in the first instance:

You can also seek advice from the following RDS colleagues when developing your application:

The Panel members will also be available to answer any queries and discuss ideas at a series of lunch time surgery sessions:

Tuesday 19 November Lansdowne Campus – B224 12:30 – 13:30
Thursday 21 November Talbot Campus – P402 12:30 – 13:30
Monday 25 November Talbot Campus – P411 12:00 – 13:00
Wednesday 27 November Lansdowne Campus – B202 12:00 – 13:00
Monday 2 December Lansdowne Campus – EB303 12:30 – 13:30
Thursday 5 December Talbot Campus – F206 12:30 – 13:30
Tuesday 10 December Talbot Campus – F304 12:30 – 13:30
Wednesday 11 December Lansdowne Campus – TBC 12:00 – 13:00

 


BU’s Research Principles

Putting the Research Impact Fund into strategic context, under BU2025, the following funding panels operate to prioritise applications for funding and make recommendations to the Research Performance and Management Committee (RPMC).

There are eight funding panels:

  1. HEIF Funding Panel
  2. GCRF Funding Panel
  3. Research Impact Funding Panel
  4. Doctoral Studentship Funding Panel
  5. ACORN Funding Panel
  6. Research Fellowships Funding Panel
  7. Charity Support Funding Panel
  8. SIA Funding panel

Please see further announcements regarding each initiative.

These panels align with the BU2025 focus on research, including BU’s Research Principles.  Specifically, but not exclusively, regarding the Research Impact Funding Panel, please refer to:

  • Principle 5 – which sets of the context for such funding panels,
  • Principle 6 and Outcome 9 – which recognises the need for interdisciplinarity and the importance of social science and humanities (SSH).

 

Gamechangers with a heart: Women Entrepreneurs in India

Dr Mili Shrivastava based on her research in Women Entrepreneurs in UK and India published an article on Indian women Entrepreneurs in The Conversation. The article outlined how women entrepreneurs are creating businesses based on environmental problems while creating opportunities for sections of society.

The article has reached far and wide across continents and was widely shared on social media.

World Economic forum reprinted the article.

The article can be found here:https://theconversation.com/how-women-entrepreneurs-are-changing-indian-society-122352

 

Invisible barriers to policy and media impact

Last week we shared a blog exploring academic engagement with the media. It can serve as a vehicle to raising professional visibility and contribute to the national expertise in the specialist research area. We recognised that a media presence can be both essential and daunting. This week Wonkhe have another interesting blog – Invisible barriers keep many academics from the media – by Liz Gloyn from Royal Holloway. It’s another great (and quick read) highlighting how breaking into the media (or policy world) can seem an impossible task. It focuses on the difficulties in making connections and specifically getting on the journalist’s (or parliamentary staff’s) radar.

Excerpts:

There is a large group of early career academics and mid-career scholars who would love to be doing more media work and to be building better connections with journalists, particularly women and people of colour. Yet invisible barriers get in the way..

When journalists want a comment on a story, they often want it very quickly, and they need to know it will be fit for purpose. Their instinctive choice will be to look through their list of pre-existing contacts and reach out to somebody they already know – which is precisely how academics with a high profile in the media maintain it.

Media appearances also breed media appearances: previous engagements make it more likely for other journalists to add you to their list of contacts. Getting on the radar of media people working in your field, or becoming “discoverable”, is a common piece of advice to people wanting to engage with the media, but in practice it is incredibly difficult to do.

It doesn’t help that the focus of a lot of media training available to academics focuses on what to do once you are in the interview seat, not how to get there in the first place. An informal call for experiences on Twitter brought out lots of responses from people whose media training had focused on how to be interviewed and what pitfalls to avoid – there was very little evidence that people were being given guidance on how to be proactive about publicising their expertise.

Fortunately here at BU we do support colleagues and focus on how to build your external profile through a range of sources. If you are looking for your research to create a policy impact then get in touch. We’d love to hear about your work and support your journey to parliamentary influence.

ADRC wins the Nutrition Resource of the Year at the 2019 Complete Nutrition Awards

The Nutrition Resource of the Year is made up of four resources called Nutrition and Dementia Care: A toolkit for health and care staff. The toolkit is to provide freely available resources to deliver person-centred nutritional care in the area of dementia. The toolkit has been used all over the UK and overseas, as far afield as Australia and is the WINNER of the 2019 CN Award for Nutrition Resource of the Year!

Both Professor Jane Murphy and Gill Hooper represented the team by attending the 2019 CN Award ceremony last Thursday 29th September in London.

In the photo: Gill Hooper (Research Assistant) and Professor Jane Murphy (Professor of Nutrition and Co-Director of ADRC)

The team that produced the toolkit includes Professor Jane Murphy, Gill Hooper (linked with the Greater Manchester Nutrition and Hydration programme), Dr Joanne Holmes and Caroline Jones.

 

In the photo: Caroline Jones, Dr Joanne Holmes and Professor Jane Murphy

 

 

 

 

 

 

The toolkit comprises:

  1. Eating and Drinking Well: Supporting People Living with Dementia workbook
  2. Eating and Drinking Well Training Video
  3. Eating and Drinking Well Nutrition leaflet
  4. Eating and Drinking Well with Dementia: A Guide for Care Staff

It is available to download for free on our specific ADRC training page, please visit: https://www.bournemouth.ac.uk/research/centres-institutes/ageing-dementia-research-centre/eating-drinking-well-dementia-toolkit.

Just launched!

We have just launched our new Eating and Drinking Well with Dementia: A Guide for Family Carers and Friends which will be available to download from the ADRC training page soon.

 Please visit our training page and spread the word of our training resources.

 

 

The CN Awards* provide the chance for all readers, advertisers and contributors of CN
Magazines to come together to recognise the achievements of those whose great work
has made a significant difference within the nutrition industry – whether an individual,
group or organisation. For further information about the CN Awards, visit: nutrition2me.com/cn-awards

*The annual CN Awards were launched in 2010 by Complete Media & Marketing Ltd. (CM2) – the publishers of Complete Nutrition (CN)
Magazines. CM2 do not endorse any particular individual’s, group’s, organisation’s or company’s products, services, resources, views or
opinions. For further details on the CN Awards, visit: nutrition2me.com/cn-awards