Tagged / EU funding

EU funding opportunities – reminder to register

As previously announced, RKEO will host seminar on EU funding opportunities (FG06, Talbot Campus, Fusion Building) on 10th October 2018. Sessions will be delivered by European Advisor of the UK Research Office Dr Andreas Kontogeorgos.
Please register to allow us to order lunch and refreshments for all attendees this week.

Sessions will commence at 11:30 with an update on Brexit, followed by a networking lunch. In the afternoon there will be a review of future ICT-related calls and more detailed overview of the COST Actions and Marie Curie training networks (MSCA ITN) funding schemes.

Everybody is welcome to choose to attend any of the sessions below:

11:30 – 12:00 – Brexit News, Q&A (to be continued during lunch if necessary)
12:00 – 13:00 – Networking Lunch
13:00 – 14:15 – Cross-disciplinary nature of ICT – forthcoming Horizon 2020 calls and topics under pillars of Industrial Leadership and Societal Challenges
14:15 – 14:30 – Comfort break / over-run time / time for people to come and in and out
14:30 – 15:15 – COST Actions – bottom-up driven networks for expanding European Cooperation in Science and Technology
15:15 – 16:30 – Overview of MSCA ITN funding scheme, followed by Q&A session

P.S. If you were unable to register, (quiet) drop-in to any separate session will be accepted.

TENDER opportunity : Study on energy costs, taxes and the impact of government interventions on investments in the energy sector

The European Commission is currently advertising a tender opportunity on the ‘Study on energy costs, taxes and the impact of government interventions on investments in the energy sector’ with the following aim:

The aim is to collect information on energy generation costs, system and external costs in the energy sector, in parallel with looking at taxes related the use of energy paid to the general budget, and to build up an inventory on government interventions related to energy. The study will cover the 28 Member States of the EU, all major energy sources and beyond the energy sector the main energy consuming branches, such as industry, transport and agriculture. Beyond the EU the study aims at building a database as complete as possible for G20 countries. In order to feed in the initiatives of the Energy Union, the study will identify best practices in the EU Member States to measure subsidies to fossil fuels, and it will analyse the impact of fossil fuel subsidies on decarbonisation objectives of EU policies and investments in climate friendly energy technologies. The next energy prices and costs report and the State of the energy Union report could use the results of the study.

Please see below a summary of this funding opportunity:

Deadline for requests to participate: 24 October 2018

Available funding : EURO 2,000,000 (excluding VAT)

Duration : 18 months

Please see this link for more information on this tender opportunity.

 

 

Introducing Ainar Blaudums: Research Facilitator – International at RKEO Funding Development Team

Dear colleagues,

My name is Ainar Blaudums; in the beginning of July 2018 I have joined Funding Development Team of the Research and Knowledge Exchange Office to perform duties of Research Facilitator for EU and International bids. I work across all faculties Tuesday to Friday, replacing my colleague Emily while she is seconded to perform duties of Research & Knowledge Exchange Development Framework Facilitator. My responsibilities include scanning strategic agendas of EU and international research funders, supporting principal investigators in strengthening their applications, ensuring the proposal meets the funder’s strategic aims and supporting the FD Officers with my expertise of EU and international funding.

I am involved in advising academics on international funding opportunities and implementation of EU funded projects from 2005 (some may recall that it was Framework Programme 6 at that time). Before coming over to Bournemouth, about four years I was engaged with universities in Scotland – University of Glasgow and University of Stirling (Institute of Aquaculture).

Before that, about eight years I used to work for government in Latvia and more than a decade worked within IT industry where I got my very first experience of research support. I have been involved in legal and financial advising, risk & incident management, implementation of organisational change and even sales of IT services and new markets development (and I have really enjoyed all of those). My background is a combination of engineering, finance and law (formalised as MEng & MSc), which has been complemented with extensive research support, project management and contracts specialist experience. Hopefully, all this will help me to better understand your ideas and adding value to your grant applications.

Throughout my career, I have been involved both in pre- and post-award activities, starting from identifying funding sources, and proposal management up to project coordination and delivery. As a professional I prefer funding schemes with clear funding rules and offer of significant grant amounts, for example Horizon 2020. I cover all sorts of international funding schemes; however, my favourites are Marie Skłodowska-Curie actions and European Research Council grants. I believe my ability to translate funders’ rules into recommendations for proposal writers may significantly improve chances to win any of Horizon 2020 collaborative and other funders’ grants.

Very shortly about me as a person – I enjoy travelling overseas, gardening and appreciate all the nice and simple things what life offers.

I will appreciate your every initiative contacting me in a case you have in mind an excellent research project idea where EU or international funding may be an option to give it a go. You already know from my colleagues what a role of research facilitator generally is. I am adding to this an international component – feel free to mention to Alex, Rachel or Ehren that you may need an advice on international funding. In a due course, I hope to be in touch with many of you.

Erasmus+ 2018 Call and Programme Guide Published

If you are planning to apply for funding in 2018 through Erasmus+, the European Union’s programme for education, training, youth and sport, you can start to prepare your grant application now. The Erasmus+ Programme Guide, which provides detailed information on how to apply, is available here.

This year’s budget has increased by €200 million since 2017, representing an increase of 8%.

The major changes since 2017 include:

  • Additional opportunities for Erasmus+ higher education students to carry out traineeships aimed at gaining digital skills;
  • The ErasmusPro initiative under VET mobility projects to boost long term mobility for VET learners;
  • A new “Schools Exchange Partnerships” format under Strategic Partnerships to help schools better finding their way into cooperation projects;
  • The action “Sector Skills Alliances” has been reintroduced to this Programme Guide;
  • The funding rules for most actions have been fine-tuned;

As in 2016 and 2017, the 2018 Programme Guide places a special focus on encouraging projects supporting social inclusion (notably of refugees and migrants), as well as preventing radicalisation.

The call deadlines for all three Key Actions can be found here. A few Key Action 2 deadlines to be aware of are;

Knowledge Alliances 28th February 2018

Strategic partnerships in the field of education and training 21st March 2018

Capacity building in the field of higher education 8th February 2018

If you are interested in applying to any of the calls then please contact your RKEO Funding Development Officer, in the first instance.

 

Cross-Border Event on Natural and Cultural Heritage – post event report

On Wednesday 11th October, BU were pleased to welcome the Interreg France (Channel) England (FCE) team and their guests for their cross-border event, considering Specific Objective 3.1: Natural and Cultural Heritage:

3.1- Realise the potential of the common natural and cultural assets to deliver innovative and sustainable growth 

The focus of this Specific Objective is to develop the economic potential of the Programme’s natural and cultural heritage. By investing in this Specific Objective the Programme aims to improve the economic, environmental and social sustainability of the Programme’s cultural and natural heritage, and to support economic growth through developing a more competitive tourism offer.

This has the aim of increasing not only the regions appeal to visitors, but making it a more appealing place to live and work with the intention of attracting businesses and therefore jobs to the area.

With over 70 attendees from across the area of eligibility, the day gave all attendees the opportunity to find out more about the programme, explore areas of common interest, meet with like-minded potential project partners and consider how their own disciplines may contribute to the delivery of innovative and sustainable economic activities which enhance common cultural and natural assets.

The day began with a welcome from Carolyn Reid (FCE Programme Manager) and Prof Michael Wilmore (Executive Dean, BU’s Faculty of Media and Communication). Following presentations outlining the scheme, attendees found out more about two funded projects – VISTA-AR and GO TRADE. Following a panel discussion with heritage experts from both France and the UK, the afternoon consisted of themed breakout sessions (Natural Heritage, Built Heritage, Intangible Tourism and Events and Trails) plus surgeries with FCE facilitators.

The day concluded with project pitches and recognition that the event had been a fruitful experience for all those in attendance.

If BU staff are considering applying for this or any other Interreg scheme, please contact Emily Cieciura, RKEO’s Research Facilitator: EU & International Funding.

Interreg: Cross-Border Event on Natural & Cultural Heritage on 11th October 2017

Don’t miss out – some places are still available at this event:

BU is proud to announce that the The Interreg France (Channel) England Programme is holding their cross-border event, to support applicants who are interested in applying for EU funding under the Programme’s specific objective 3.1 on natural and cultural heritage, at Bournemouth University. This event will take place in BU’s Executive Business Centre on Wednesday, 11th October 2017. Booking is essential.

The event is a fantastic opportunity to:

  • Understand how to apply for EU funding under the Programme’s specific objective on natural and cultural heritage
  • Hear from experts working in the heritage industry
  • Find out what heritage needs and priorities have been identified in the Channel area
  • Hear from heritage projects already approved by the Programme
  • Network with applicants and project partners from both France and the UK

We look forward to welcoming guests from both France and the UK at this event.

Interreg: Cross-Border Event on Natural & Cultural Heritage on 11th October 2017

BU is proud to announce that the The Interreg France (Channel) England Programme is holding their cross-border event, to support applicants who are interested in applying for EU funding under the Programme’s specific objective 3.1 on natural and cultural heritage, at Bournemouth University. This event will take place in BU’s Executive Business Centre on 11th October 2017. Booking is essential.

The event is a fantastic opportunity to:

  • Understand how to apply for EU funding under the Programme’s specific objective on natural and cultural heritage
  • Hear from experts working in the heritage industry
  • Find out what heritage needs and priorities have been identified in the Channel area
  • Hear from heritage projects already approved by the Programme
  • Network with applicants and project partners from both France and the UK

Find out more and reserve your place.

Policy and political scene this week: 25 May 2017

Welcome to this week’s political scene within research. Here is a summary of the week’s generic policy reports and releases, alongside new niche consultations and inquiries.

The role of EU funding in UK research and innovation

This week the role of EU funding in UK research and innovation has hit the headlines. Its an analysis of the academic disciplines most reliant on EU research and innovation funding at a granular level.

Jointly commissioned by Technopolis and the UK’s four national academies (Medical Sciences, British Academy, Engineering and Royal Society) it highlights that of the 15 disciplines most dependent on EU funding 13 are within the arts, humanities and social science sphere.

Most reliant on the EU funding as a proportion of their total research funding are Archaeology (38% of funding), Classics (33%) and IT (30%).

The full report dissects the information further considering the funding across disciplines, institutions, industrial sectors, company sizes and UK regions. It differentiates between the absolute value of the research grant income from EU government bodies, and the relative value of research grant income from EU government bodies with respect to research grant income from all sources, including how the EU funding interacts with other funding sources.

There are also 11 focal case studies, including archaeology and ICT. Here’s an excerpt from the archaeology case study considering the risks associated with Brexit and the UK’s industrial strategy:

As archaeologists are heavily dependent on EU funding, a break away from EU funding sources puts the discipline in a vulnerable position. This is exacerbated by the fact that the UK is short of archaeologists and/or skilled workers active in the field of Archaeology because of the surge in large scale infrastructure projects (e.g. HS2, Crossrail, and the A14), which drives away many archaeologists from research positions.” Source

See the full report page 25 for particular detail on ICT and digital sector, and page 39 for archaeology. For press coverage see the Financial Times article.

Bathing Water Quality

The European Environment Agency published European Bathing Water Quality in 2016. It sees the UK as second to bottom in the league table for quality of bathing water. While 96.4% of British beaches were found safe to swim in last year 20 sites failed the annual assessment. Only Ireland had a higher percentage of poor quality bathing waters at 4%.

Report link: https://www.eea.europa.eu/publications/european-bathing-water-quality-in-2016

How and when to submit evidence to policy makers

This week Research Professional ran a succinct article encouraging researchers to think more about when and how they submit evidence to policy makers. Timing is key, policy makers often want information instantaneously and the article urges researchers to be responsive but pragmatic, including a pro-active approach of gently keeping key policy makers informed of new developments.

Researchers wanting to have a political impact may consider attending a UK Parliament Outreach and Engagement Service events.

 

Consultations and Inquiries

Responding to a select committee call for evidence is a great way for academics to influence UK policy. If you respond to a consultation or inquiry as a BU member of staff please let us know of your interest by emailing policy@bournemouth.ac.uk at least one week before you submit your response.

This week there are three new inquiries and consultations that may be of interest to BU academics.

Sports

A Scottish Parliament inquiry is seeking individual’s views on community-based approaches to removing barriers to participation in grassroots sport and physical activity, including how to promote volunteering. The committee is asking for views and examples on a range of questions, including:

  • Examples where a community based approach has been successful in removing barriers to participation in sport and physical activity?
  • Approaches that were particularly successful in increasing participation among certain social groups, like women, ethnic minorities, certain age-groups?
  • The barriers facing volunteers and how can they be overcome? The aim is to inform how Scotland might increase participation rates across all groups and sectors of society, respondents can select to answer only the most relevant questions.

The call for evidence closes on 30 June.

Body Image

The British Youth Council has opened an inquiry into body image and how the growth of social media and communications platforms has encouraged attitudes that entrench poor body image. Included among the inquiry questions are:

  • Has the growing use of social media and communications platforms amongst young people encouraged practices and attitudes that entrench poor body image? What is the link between “sexting” and body dissatisfaction?
  • Do internet companies, social media platforms or other platforms have a responsibility to tackle trends which entrench poor body image? What are they already doing in this area? What more should they be doing?
  • Are particular groups of young people particularly prone to poor body image, or less likely to seek help? What causes these trends?
  • In relation to young men and boys, minority ethnic groups, and those who self-identify as transgender: what are the specific challenges facing young people in these groups? How effective is existing support?
  • To what extent is dissatisfaction with body image contributing to the increase in mental health problems amongst children and young people?

The call for evidence closes on 16 June.

Drainage & Flooding

The Welsh government has opened a consultation on the implementation of sustainable drainage systems on new developments (schedule 3 of the Flood and Water Management Act 2010).

The consultation closes on 11 August.

 

HE Policy Update

You can also sign up to receive BU’s separate weekly HE policy update delivered direct to your inbox each Friday by emailing policy@bournemouth.ac.uk

 

Sarah Carter

Policy & Public Affairs Officer

Latest Funding Opportunities

euro-cash

The following funding opportunities have been announced. Please follow the links for more information.

 

Surrey Archaeological Society, Archaeology and History Grants

Surrey Archaeological Society welcomes applications which will assist archaeological and historical research within the county. Applicants will be expected to demonstrate in what ways the proposed research will further understanding of the County’s archaeology and history. It is anticipated that some form of Project Design will be submitted (as long or short as the occasion demands, but essentially to say what the project is about, why it should be done, how it will be done, by whom, how much it will cost, and when and how it will be archived, written up and the results disseminated.)

Deadline- none

Amount of grant- £2000

 

Society for the study of Addiction_ Bursary Scheme

The aim of the Bursary scheme is to facilitate training in the addictions field for individuals experiencing difficulty in funding a course of study.

The Society’s Trustees make SSA funds available to individuals who:

  • have been offered a place on a UK University-validated, UK-based programme in specialist addiction studies;
  • have a demonstrable commitment to working in the addictions field;
  • have not participated in a substantial event of this nature in the one year prior to that for which they have applied (unless the latter is a follow-up course for which they cannot obtain funding).

Amount of bursary: £1000 per annum standard award (or less if the fees are below this amount) for an individual course of study in any one financial year; or a maximum of £1,500 when taking courses consisting of more than a single module.

Deadline- none

 

The Wellcome Trust

This scheme is for small-scale humanities and social science research projects, scoping exercises or meetings in any area of human or animal health, including projects relating to research resources.

The normal maximum that can be applied for is £5,000. If funding is intended for international meetings, or to attract international speakers, up to £10,000 may be requested.

Amount: £5000 and if funding is intended for international meetings: £10000

Deadline: none

 

Royal Society Wolfson Research Merit Award

The scheme provides universities with additional support to enable them to recruit or retain respected scientists of outstanding achievement and potential to the UK. It provides a salary enhancement which is paid by the university in addition to the basic salary.

The scheme covers all areas of the life and physical sciences, including engineering, but excluding clinical medicine.

The scheme is jointly funded by the Wolfson Foundation and the Royal Society.

Applicants can be of any nationality and must hold a permanent post at a university in the UK or have received a firm offer to take effect from the start of the award as well as having their basic salary wholly funded by the university.

The eligibility of the application must be discussed between the Vice Chancellor of the university or their elected representative (e.g. Head of Department) and the Royal Society Grants Office before an application can be made.

Interested applicants must let RKEO know at first instance and we will contact the Funder about this scheme, after which a security code can be obtained for the nominated researcher to begin the application on e-GAP.

Before applying, please ensure that you meet all the eligibility requirements, which are explained in the scheme notes.

The scheme provides up to 5 years’ funding after which the award holder continues with the permanent post at the host university.

The focus of the award is a salary enhancement, usually in the range of £10,000 to £30,000 per annum.

It is the responsibility of the host university to pay the basic salary. It is also the responsibility of the host university to meet the employer’s contributions towards pensions and National Insurance for both the basic salary and salary enhancement.

Deadline for applications: 4th July 2016

 

Innovate UK- Funding competition: manufacturing and materials

Innovate UK is to invest up to £15 million in innovation projects in manufacturing and/or materials. These projects will focus on identified technical or commercial challenges. It will fund projects that aim to lead to increased UK SME productivity, competitiveness and growth.

Projects need to be led by a business and must involve at least one SME. They can be carried out by an SME working alone or in collaboration with other organisations. Projects with costs of £100,000 or more must involve working with other partners

The funder is looking for projects which focus on any of the technical feasibility, industrial research or experimental development research categories.

Projects should last between 6 months and 3 years. They should range from total costs of £50,000 to £2 million.

Deadline for registrations by noon: 6th July2016

Deadline for applications by noon: 13th July 2016

 

Innovate UK_ Connected digital additive manufacturing

Innovate UK is investing up to £4.5 million in collaborative industrial research projects that stimulate innovation in additive manufacturing, also known as 3D printing.

The aim of this competition is to help companies overcome barriers to business growth in additive manufacturing. It will also encourage them to explore and develop their wider digital manufacturing capability. This will help them secure a more productive and competitive business proposition in the future.

Projects must range in size from total costs of £500,000 to £1.5 million.

A business must lead this project. You must collaborate with at least one other business. You can invite research organisations to work with you on this project.

Deadline for registrations before noon: 20 July 2016.

Deadline for applications before noon: 27 July 2016.

 

BBSRC_Foundation Awards for Global Agriculture and Food Systems

The Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF) is a new 5-year £1.5Bn resource funding stream, announced as part of the 2015 spending review, to ensure that UK research takes a leading role in addressing the problems faced by developing countries. The GCRF will deploy the UK’s world-class research capability to address the challenges faced by the developing world. The funding is protected science spend and the Research Councils are primary delivery partners. The GCRF is also part of the UK Government’s pledge to allocate 0.7% of Gross National Income to Official Development Assistance, promoting the welfare and economic development of developing countries. With the GCRF focus on global challenges, research investments are expected to span disciplines including the biological sciences, environmental sciences, medicine, engineering and physical sciences, the social sciences and the arts and humanities.

BBSRC, MRC, ESRC, AHRC and NERC are working in a co-funding partnership to support multidisciplinary Foundation Awards for Global Agriculture and Food Systems. Foundation awards aim to be flexible, moderately sized, short to medium-term investments targeted towards novel research objectives – that address the challenges faced by the developing world. Up to £16.3M is available based on the quality of proposals received. BBSRC is leading and manging the call on behalf of the other funders with an anticipated BBSRC budget in the region of £12M and funding support from MRC, ESRC, AHRC and NERC.

This BBSRC-led call complements the MRC-led Foundation Awards strategies in Global Health Science – Beyond Infections, and Global Infections – Vision and Strategy; these other calls are also being co-funded substantially by BBSRC, and also by ESRC, AHRC and NERC.

Applications must be submitted by UK Research Organisations that are eligible to receive funding from BBSRC. Information about eligible organisations is available on the RCUK website (see external links). Non-eligible partners (including those from overseas organisations) may be included, as described in section two of our grants guide, under ‘Collaborative Research Grants’.

 

There is a two stage application and assessment process: outline and full proposals.

BBSRC is leading on the administration of this call, on behalf of all the funders. Applicants should refer to the BBSRC grants guide and Je-S help text for further information.

Deadline for outline applications via Je-S by 4pm: 22 June 2016

 

Technical and scientific support in relation to the implementation of the 92/43/EEC Habitats and 2009/147/EC Birds Directives

The Directorate-General for Education and Culture has opened a call for tenders, to provide technical and scientific input to the Commission in 3 areas which are of key importance for the implementation of EU nature legislation (Birds Directive 2009/147/EC and Habitats Directive 92/43/EEC): analysis of legal cases or EU-funded projects and programmes to verify conformity with the requirements of EU nature legislation; drafting of guidance documents and technical notes to promote coherent implementation of the Directives; and evaluation of information submitted by Member States under reporting obligations of the Directives.

The contract is worth €1.8 million over 36 months.

Deadline for receipt of tender 16:00: 22 June 2016.

ESRC_Tackling antimicrobial resistance: behaviour within and beyond the healthcare setting

The ESRC, in partnership with the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), the Medical Research Council (MRC), the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) and the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) are pleased to invite applications for cross disciplinary proposals on the topic of behaviour relating to antimicrobial resistance (AMR).

This call will address theme 4 of the cross-Research Council initiative (MRC website) on AMR: ‘Behaviour within and beyond the health care setting’. Through this call, we aim to expand understanding of how the behaviour of public, professionals and organisations impacts on AMR: how it can enhance or control the spread of AMR; how it is affected by social, psychological and organisational context, cultures and history; and how it can be influenced to create different future scenarios.

The funder will accept two types of proposal:

  • Small scale pump priming grants – maximum of £250,000 at 100 per cent FEC for up to 24 months. These grants will be primarily for research relevant to the needs of Low and Middle Income Countries (LMICs).
  • Large scale collaborative grants – maximum of £2 million at 100 per cent FEC for up to 48 months. These grants will be open to proposals focusing on the UK or global settings.

All proposals should be highly collaborative and have a strong focus on real world impact. Research proposals relevant to humans or animals are welcomed. This call includes a significant proportion of funding from the Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF). GCRF forms part of the UK’s Official Development Assistance commitment, and will be awarded in a manner that fits with Official ODA guidelines.

Deadlines:

Pump priming proposals: 16.00 on 20 July 2016

Collaborative grants: 16.00 on 8 September 2016

If planning to apply for a large scale collaborative grant submit an expression of interest (EoI), using the short online form by 27 July 2016. 

ESRC_GCRF Secondary Data Analysis Initiative highlight notice

Expected to open by the 10th June, ESRC is planning to announce a Secondary Data Analysis Initiative (SDAI) highlight call as part of its contribution to the new Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF). GCRF is a £1.5 billion fund to support cutting-edge research which addresses the challenges faced by developing countries. The fund will address global challenges through disciplinary and interdisciplinary research and will strengthen capability for research and innovation within both UK and developing countries, providing an agile response to emergencies where there is an urgent research need.

The aims of this highlight notice will be to:

  • utilise existing data resources to produce high-quality, impactful research on developing countries
  • improve the capacity and methods for secondary data research in and on developing countries
  • co-produce substantive and innovative data research in readiness for future GCRF calls
  • provide insight into existing data resources which can be used to conduct research on developing countries
  • Thematically, the highlight will encourage focus on the five core areas ESRC has initially identified in its GCRF contribution:
  • Building effective institutions in conflict-affected and fragile states
  • Migration, mobility and development
  • Dynamics of inequalities
  • Innovation and inclusive economic growth
  • Shocks, security, risks and resilience

All proposals will have to make a clear case for how they comply with Official Development Assistance (ODA) guidelines.

All projects will be required to commence by January 2017. The funder aims to fund around seven projects, with a total budget of £1 million allocated to this call.

Deadline for proposals: 11 July 2016

 

EC_2016 Call for proposals for LIFE Grants

The LIFE (the Financial Instrument for the Environment) Regulation, which was published on 20 December 2013, sets a budget for the next funding period, 2014–2020, of €3.4 billion in current prices.

Current traditional open calls span from Climate Change Action, Environment and resource Efficiency, Nature and Biodiversity and Environmental Governance and Information.

Deadlines: 7-15 September 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

European Research Council- Starting Grant and Consolidator Grant figures

ercHave you thought about applying to the European Research Council (ERC) for funding?  Although the funding calls are not yet open, it may be worth starting on your proposal now as calls are published every year.

Starting Grants: For 2015, a combined total of €429 million was given to 291 early-career researchers, with the greatest number (48) being awarded the UK and an overall success rate of 12%. For 2016, the ERC received 2935 applications (an increase of (+0.5%).  The highest number of applications were from Physical Sciences and Engineering (1299), followed by Life Sciences (854, a decrease of -3%), and Social Science and Humanities (782, an increase of +3%).

Starting Grants are for researchers who have 2-7 years of experience since the completion of a PhD and a track record of excellence, you may be eligible for up to €1.5 million for projects lasting up to five years.

Consolidator Grant: For 2015, the ERC gave a combined €585 million to 302 successful applicants for an overall sucess rate of 15%.  For 2016, the number of applicants increase by 12% from the previous call with the highest number of applications was submitted from Physical Sciences and Engineering (1075), followed by Life Sciences (713), and Social Science and Humanities (516).

The Consolidator Grant is a fund with up to €2 million available for researchers with 7-12 years of experience since the completion of a PhD who also have a demonstrable record showing scientific talent and excellence.

As part of the first phase of a two phase application process, evaluators will first judge the synopsis and CV of the applicant to see if the work is ground-breaking in nature, ambitious and feasible.  The evaluators will also judge the track record of the applicant to see if they have the proven intellectual capacity (through publication), creativity (novelty) and commitment (through a track record of managing previous projects).

If you are interested in applying to these funds, please contact Emily Cieciura, the Research Facilitator for EU & International funding or your relevant faculty Funding Development Officer.

COST Actions – supporting high-risk, innovative and emerging research themes

COST Actions are a flexible, fast, effective and efficient networking instrument for researchers, engineers and scholars to cooperate and coordinate nationally funded research activities. COST Actions allow European researchers to jointly develop their own ideas in any science and technology field. COST Actions are bottom-up  science and technology networks, open to researchers and stakeholders  with a duration of four years. They are active through a range of  networking tools , such as workshops, conferences, training schools, short-term scientific missions (STSMs), and dissemination activities.  COST does not fund research itself.

COST prides in its support for high-risk, innovative and emerging research themes. Importantly, COST does not set any research priorities. cost

Currently on the COST website is a report on Collecting research data to counter femicide worldwide

Femicide across Europe is the first pan-European research network investigating the causes and risk factors of a phenomenon killing thousands of women every year, worldwide.

Femicide refers to the killing of women and girls because of their gender. European researchers studying the  cultural, societal and psychological   causes  and  risks factors  behind femicide set up the network to fight the phenomenon through advocacy and research. One idea is to create a  European Femicide Observatory  gathering and comparing data from each of the 30 countries involved, of which half are Inclusiveness Target Countries . The goal is to come up with  new guidelines  and shape new EU public policies countering killings.

Specialists have been studying quantitative and qualitative data and ways to reduce discrepancies in country records. Such discrepancies are often due to the different definitions of femicide, which is sometimes seen as gender-based violence.

When our COST Action was first proposed, the term femicide was not widely used. Everyone knew of homicide, but few had given thought to the fact that some women, particularly those involved in intimate relationships, were murdered simply because they were women. Today, two years within the COST Action, ‘femicide’ has become a buzzword, Action Chair Dr Shalva Weil explains.

Network members have also been advocating for a more straightforward approach to lowering femicide rates in Europe. They have already addressed the Portuguese Parliament and the Parliament of Aragon in Spain. The network also took part in two United Nations sessions in Bangkok (November 2014) and New York (October 2015).

By participating in the network’s training schools and scientific exchanges, young researchers are also given the chance to better understand the phenomenon EU-wide. One outstanding result of the Action’s work is a  comparison of national statistics from 10 European countries .

The Action’s next annual meeting will take place in Ljubljana, Slovenia, in May 2016.

Why not take a look at the COST Action database to see if there is a current Action relating to your research? You can then consider joining an existing Action or submitting your own proposal.

Click on the tag COST Action (below) to see other BU posts on this topic, including  Edwin van Teijlingen’s report on his recent publication and his experience of attending a COST Action Training School.

If you are interested in applying for COST, please contact Emily Cieciura, Research Facilitator: EU & International of you Faculty’s Funding Development Officer.

Creative, Digital & Design Business Briefing – September 2015

theme - creative-digitalThis is a monthly publication that provides a digest of useful information about funding, financing, support and events to assist creative, digital and design businesses with their innovation and growth strategies.

Highlights include:

European Funding Guide – Creative Industries

A short KTN guide to help you submit a proposal for the Horizon 2020 funding programme (H2020) & other European funding sources. It provides a brief overview of support, how to apply and useful links.

More information »

Internet of Things Cites Demonstrator

Up to £10 million funding competition to demonstrate the capability of the Internet of Things in a city region. Projects should involve at least one local authority, one local enterprise partnership and several businesses.

More information »

Digital forensics – up to £300K phase 1

The challenge from the Home Office, is to improve the speed, efficiency and effectiveness of recovering and automatically analysing data from the seized digital devices of suspects under investigation. Maximum value of £40K per project.

More information »

Potential Changes to Horizon 2020 Priorities

The European Commission intends to introduce three major funding streams into Horizon 2020 and ditch six others, a draft plan obtained by Research Europe says.

The new focus areas for the 2016 and 2017 work programmes will be the Internet of Things, automated road transport and an approach to sustainable industrial production called “the circular economy”, according to the draft plan.

Work programmes for 2014-15 were built around 12 priorities, but only six of these—digital security, smart cities, energy efficiency, low-carbon energy, blue growth and food security—will remain for the next phase of the programme.

The six surviving priorities and three new ones will form the backbone for calls for proposals in pillars two and three, covering industrial leadership and the societal challenges. The document also promises a stronger role for the social sciences in 2016 and 2017.

The six areas to be downgraded are personalised healthcare, waste, water, mobility, disaster protection and tackling the financial crisis. They will no longer be considered as overarching focus areas, according to the plan. Instead, they are likely to be tackled through individual Horizon 2020 calls.

The 12-page draft has been developed on the basis of recommendations from about 20 advisory groups, as well as public consultations. It is still subject to alteration, but has been passed to member states’ representatives on the Horizon 2020 programme committee.

According to the document, the selected nine focus areas offer the best chance for Horizon 2020 to support EU policy goals, including economic growth and employment, the development of a digital single market and improved energy supply. They will also help the EU to raise its manufacturing success by developing emerging industries such as cyber-physical systems and 3-D printing, it says.

On the social sciences and humanities, the document says the Commission will include the disciplines as an “integral part in the conceptual design” of calls this time round. This follows a recommendation from the European Forum on Forward Looking Activities, or Effla, that non-technical solutions to problems should be given more emphasis. “A lot of the societal challenges are driven heavily by human behaviour, and that didn’t seem to be coming out sufficiently [in the last work programmes],” says advisory member Luke Georghiou, the vice-president for research and innovation at the University of Manchester.

The document also indicates that 2016-17 work programmes will more actively seek non-EU participation, as was recommended by member states. “Many topics will be flagged as being specifically relevant for international cooperation,” the document says, and specific funding will be offered “to ensure the right international partners are attracted”.

Other areas considered more important than before include public procurement to fund commercial R&D, the use of challenge prizes to solve particular problems, and gender studies. Measures will be taken to raise the participation of female researchers, it says.

The document is accompanied by 17 annexes setting out plans for each of the societal challenges and the enabling technologies for 2016-17, as well as the Future and Emerging Technologies, Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions and research infrastructures from the first pillar. These documents are the basis for the work programmes, due to be finalised in the second half of 2015.

But despite acknowledging that Horizon 2020 has more flexibility than Framework 7, Georghiou says the Commission could still do more to update its priorities, even after the work programmes are under way. “It’s an in-built problem, if you set out a programme that has a several-year horizon and is focused on societal challenges, that the nature of those challenges will evolve as the programme proceeds,” he says. “You can’t start with an initial list of topics and expect that to be unchanged, so you have to keep updating and revising it.”

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