Tagged / conference

Forthcoming Event: Branded Content Research Network Conference

The Branded Content Research Network are pleased to announce that their forthcoming Branded Content Research Network Conference is taking place next month from Tuesday 7 to Wednesday 8 November in London.

A one-day conference will take place on the Tuesday, while Wednesday will consist of pre-conference meetings of the network and an open public meeting ‘Is there anything wrong with branded content?’ to end the two-day event.

The Branded Content Research Network is an academic network project, funded by the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council, who seek to bring together academic researchers, industry and civil society interests to explore the practices and implications of branded content, native advertising and the convergence of media and marketing communications.


About the Conference:

Marketers increasingly produce their own branded media content (‘owned’ media) and they seek to integrate advertising more seamlessly into the editorial forms and flows of publishing, audio, audiovisual, and social media communications. The integration of media and advertising is not new, but it is intensifying. Forms of branded content and ‘native’ advertising are developing rapidly, transforming marketing communications, challenging regulatory arrangements, and raising a host of issues from consumer awareness and acceptance of advertising to the consequences for the media’s editorial independence and creative autonomy.

The Branded Content Research Network aims to investigate the changing relationships between media and marketing and to promote research, collaboration and dialogue across a very wide range of interests and perspectives. The network brings together academic researchers, industry and civil society interests to explore the practices and implications of branded content, native advertising, and media-marketing convergence. Branded content is both an economic and a cultural phenomenon that requires cross-disciplinary resources and new approaches in analysis.

The conference will bring together international researchers at all stages of their careers, and marketing practitioners, for presentations and dialogue to explore insights and help to build research capacities and international collaboration. The conference is hosted by the Branded Content Research Network and the Advertising Research Group (ARTWG), a temporary working group within the European Communication Research and Education Association (ECREA).

Click here to view the full draft conference programme.


Registration

The event is free but places are limited and advance booking is required. To register, please click here.

Please complete your booking by 2 November as we will not be able to accept late bookings after that date (except for the public meeting, space permitting). Please note that all those who have booked a two-day ticket for 7-8 November do not need to book separately to attend the evening meeting.

If you would like any further information, including travel and accommodation, please email j.hardy@uel.ac.uk.

BU midwifery research at the international Normal birth research conference

The Normal birth research conference is an annual, international event that takes place to focus on less complicated aspects of pregnancy and birth. This year it took place in the beautiful surroundings of Grange-over-sands overlooking Morecambe bay and on the edge of the Lake District. On this occasion there were delegates from over 20 countries including Canada, USA, New Zealand, Australia, Brazil, Poland, Spain, the Netherlands, Sweden, Norway and India! The attendees included midwives, obstetricians, birth supporters, architects, artists, geographers and educators as well as representatives of the World Health organisation, charities and Baroness Cumberlege from the UK House of Lords.

Sara Stride, Jenny Hall, and Jane Fry at the conference

Research at Bournemouth University was well represented from CMMPH, CQR and CEL. Midwifery lecturer, Sara stride, on behalf of the research team of Professor Vanora Hundley and Dr Sue Way, presented a poster of their work, ‘a qualitative study to explore UK midwives’ individual practice, beliefs and attitudes regarding perineal care at the time of birth’. Dr Jane Fry, also from the midwifery team, presented a research topic on her Doctoral work, ‘ A descriptive phenomenological study of independent midwives’ use of intuition as an authoritative form of knowledge during women’s labours and births’.  She also facilitated a workshop titled ‘ Finding your own intuition: a workshop designed to explore practitioners’ ways of knowing during childbirth’ .

 

Jenny Hall with Professor Susan Crowther at the book launch [(c) Sheena Byrom]

Dr Jenny Hall presented a research topic based on recent research with Dr Bethan Collins from Liverpool University, Professor Vanora Hundley and Jilly Ireland, midwife and visiting researcher, ‘How can we improve the ‘normal’ childbirth experience of disabled women?’. She also facilitated a workshop with a colleague from RGU, Aberdeen, Professor Susan Crowther, ‘Spirituality and childbirth: bringing a felt-sense into childbirth- a co-operative inquiry’. In addition, her new internationally authored book jointly edited with Professor Crowther, ‘Spirituality and Childbirth: Meaning and care at the start of life’, was officially launched at the conference.

The impression taken away was the passion and importance of more evidence required around more ‘normal’ aspects of pregnancy and birth, especially in countries with less resources. There is considerable humanising of care being carried out internationally, and is a key focus at the World health organisation. A focus for the UK midwifery is current maternity services transformation, yet much of the global focus is on the importance of transformation in line with the recent Lancet series on maternity, and international collaboration to achieve the goals for Sustainable development. As a force, the team behind normal birth research serve this area powerfully, in informing care for women, babies and families across the global arena. The final rousing talk by Australian professor Hannah Dahlen, to the current backlash to ‘normal birth’ in the media was inspiring and is an editorial in the international journal Women and Birth. Next year the conference is in Michigan, USA!

Call for Abstracts Now Open – 10th Annual Postgraduate Conference


The Annual Postgraduate Conference showcases some of Bournemouth University’s best postgraduate research, providing PGRs the opportunity to present and disseminate their research to their peers, colleagues and the wider BU community.

Applications Now Open

Abstracts are invited for oral, poster and photograph presentations. To submit an abstract, download and complete the Application Form following the How to Apply Guidance.

Please note the selection process is competitive. Oral abstracts will be shortlisted by an academic panel and you will be advised if you have been successful after the closing date.

Call for abstracts is now open and closes at midnight, Thursday 4 January 2018.

Email your fully completed application form to: pgconference@bournemouth.ac.uk

Association for Psychosocial Studies Biennial Conference

Association for Psychosocial Studies Biennial Conference

Bournemouth University, 5th-7th April 2018

 

 

‘Psychosocial Reflections on a Half Century of Cultural Revolution:

The 50th anniversary of seasons of love and protest’ 

Now with new Open Stream on “ New Directions in Psychosocial Studies” 

 

Join us to reflect on revolutionary relationships and politics which challenged authority then and which influence us now. The cultural forces and the political movements of 1967 and 1968 aimed to change the world, and did so. Where are we now? Recent developments of some populist and protest politics could be seen as a continuation of the revolutionary movements in the 1960s. Hedonic themes that recall the summer of love suffuse contemporary life, and self-reflection and emotional literacy have also become prominent values, along with more positive attitudes towards human diversity and the international community. We invite you to offer psychosocial analyses of the development and legacy today of the ‘revolutions’ in sex, personal life and politics. This could be via explorations of contemporary issues in politics, culture and artistic expression, or through historical studies. All proposals for papers must indicate how they address both psychological and social dimensions of their topic.

 

Due to popular demand, we have added a new open stream, for those who wish to submit proposals for papers, panels or visual art presentations on

“Current and New Directions in Psychosocial Studies”

Further details: http://aps2018.bournemouth.ac.uk/call-for-papers/

Send your abstract of 250-300 words to APS2018@bournemouth.ac.uk

Final deadline: 1st December 2017. Confirmation of acceptance: 1st Jan

(existing submissions, notified by 1st. November).

We welcome contributions from academics and practitioners from different fields and disciplines and very much look forward to seeing you there!

Vitae Researcher Development International Conference

On 11 – 12 September 2017 Clare Cutler and Natalie Stewart (Doctoral College Research Skills and Development Officers) attended the Vitae Researcher Development International Conference, focused on researcher development policy, impact and application.

With over 400 delegates in attendance, the conference celebrated 100 years of the modern PhD in the UK and 50 years of researcher development. With a strong emphasis on the future of researcher development, the growing importance of developing the highest calibre research students, and an increasingly diverse and competitive job market, we came back inspired…inspired to provide a sector leading researcher development programme accessible to all Bournemouth University postgraduate research students.

Three Minute Thesis UK Final

The UK National 3MT® Final was hosted at the conference gala dinner where six finalists from across the UK competed to win a £3k grant to spend on a public engagement activity and a place on the Taylor & Francis Journal Editor Mentoring Programme. This year’s winner was Thomas Fudge from Brunel University. Thomas, who completed his undergraduate degree in Product Design here at BU, stole the prize with the winning presentation on ‘decentralised sanitation for developing communities with energy and nutrient recovery’. You can watch all of the finalist presentations on the Vitae Website here.

Researcher Development Programme

With Researcher Development at the forefront of the research agenda, this year the Doctoral College Researcher Development Programme will be offering over 150 workshops, online modules and video resources specifically for our postgraduate research student’s professional, personal and research development. We have also teamed up with the University of East Anglia, to provide an interactive online training series which is due to launch later this month.

In addition to this full and varied programme we will also be launching the Doctoral College’s inaugural 3MT® event. For your place in this national competition and to be in with a chance of presenting your research at the 2018 Vitae Conference 3MT® Final, don’t forget to submit your application by Sunday 22 October 2017 to PGRskillsdevelopment@bournemouth.ac.uk.

 

What happens when things go wrong in medicine?

1-day BU conference/workshop examining what happens when things go wrong in surgery, 8th September 2017

Every day we make mistakes; we pick up the wrong set of keys from the kitchen drawer, pick up the wrong identical suitcase from the airport carousel, or, in the case of the Oscars, a near identical envelope is given to Warren Beatty who then announces the wrong Best Film winner.

What happens when things go wrong in surgery where the consequences can be much more serious?  While attention, quite rightly, focuses on patient need when things go wrong, the aim of this event is to examine how medical professionals can be better supported and trained to cope with these adverse events.

Eminent speakers from around the UK will present the latest research in the area, share insights from their surgical careers and personal experiences and will consider:-

Impact – The personal impact when complications and errors arise in surgery

Resilience – Dealing with stress and maintaining wellbeing

Restoration – what can be done when things go wrong?

While the focus is on surgeons, it is clear that those in other medical professions (e.g. nurses, midwives, GPs) face similar issues in the workplace. Anyone with an interest in the topic is welcome to attend (attendance is free for BU staff).   For further details and to register for the conference please visit www.surgeonwellbeing.co.uk or contact Professor Siné McDougall (smcdougall@bournemouth.ac.uk; ext. 61722).

“Is it 2 breastfeeds and then a bottle, or is it one breastfeed and a bottle? Not sure”?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last week Senior Midwifery lecturer Dr Luisa Cescutti-Butler, member of CMMPH, had the opportunity to attend and present at the prestigious international 3 day conference organised by MAINN @ UCLAN. Nutrition and Nurture in Infancy and Childhood: Bio-Cultural Perspectives. It took place in the beautiful surrounds of Grange-Over-Sands in Cumbria. It was attended by speakers and researchers from India, Australia, Sweden, South Africa, USA, Canada as well as the UK and therefore an ideal networking opportunity. The title of Luisa’s presentation was “Is it 2 breastfeeds and then a bottle, or is it one breastfeed and a bottle? Not sure”?, based on her PhD study, supervised by Professor Ann Hemingway, Dr. Jaqui Hewitt-Taylor. The paper reported on women’s experiences of feeding their late preterm baby/babies (LPBs), born between 340/7 and 36 6/7 weeks gestation, especially pertinent as the rates for these births is rising. A feminist approach to the study had been utilised using in depth two phase qualitative interviews.

Luisa says of the conference: ‘ I got to meet researchers that I have used widely within my PhD such as Renee Flacking from Sweden who has undertaken research around preterm babies, Virginia Schmied internationally renowned midwifery professor and Professor Paula Meier who has extensively researched late preterm babies and breastfeeding. She came and listened to my presentation and enjoyed it. Thought my findings were very interesting but was a little dismayed that practice had not moved forward. It was also a good opportunity to meet up with twitter buddies such as Laura Godfrey-Isaacs @godfrey_issacs, who took the photos!’

Luisa may be contacted further about her study but the findings indicate that women caring for LPBs frequently encountered contradictory advice regarding infant feeding and often felt their own experiences, intuition and instincts were devalued. The research concludes that the practice of feeding of LPBs should be revisited in partnership with women, so their experiences and perspectives can be utilised to develop satisfying nurturing relationships whilst also meeting nutritional requirements and that breastfeeding is a feminist, human rights issue. The full abstract is published in the conference proceedings.

 

Psychology PGR Sarah Hodge presents at two prestigious USA conferences and wins prize

Representing the research team from Bournemouth University, Sarah Hodge presented cross-disciplinary PhD research at two conferences in Las Vegas (April) and Denver (May).

The first conference Broadcast Education Association (BEA) included a symposium organised and attended by key academics in the area of psychology and gaming and within this Sarah won top paper in the symposium track and 2nd place student paper. The research presented was funded by the University Student Research Assistant (SRA) scheme, which involved collaboration between departments and faculties. The research involved creating a game to measure in-game moral decisions. The research team included Jacqui Taylor and John McAlaney from the Department of Psychology, Davide Melacca and Christos Gatzidis from the Department of Creative Technology, and Eike Anderson from the National Centre for Computer Animation.

 

At the second conference Computers in Human Interaction (CHI), Sarah had a workshop paper accepted on Ethical Encounters in Human Computer Interaction and this naturally stimulated many interesting questions about ethics in research. Sarah was a student volunteer at the conference. Sarah was a Chair student Volunteer at British HCI 2016 that was held at Bournemouth University last summer and this experience supported being accepted as a Student Volunteer at CHI. From this experience Sarah was assigned the role of Day Captain, which involved supporting and overseeing the other student volunteers with their duties. Sarah found it to be a great experience and highly recommends other students to consider being a student volunteer as a great chance to network and it also helps with funding conferences as the registration fee was waived.

 

Hodge, S. Taylor, J & McAlaney, J (2017). Restricted Content: Ethical Issues with Researching Minors’ Video Game Habits Human in Computer Interaction (CHI) May, Denver USA

If you would like more information about the research please contact: shodge@bournemouth.ac.uk

Lizzie Gauntlett at the International Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) Conference 18th & 19th May 2017

Glasgow’s necropolis- the quietest voices of all?

‘Where are we now?’ was the theme of the 2017 International IPA conference this week. The short answer: at Glasgow Caledonian University. The long answer: using a qualitative methodology initially confined to healthcare research but which is now enjoying exponential growth across diverse disciplines. Talks over the two days ranged from advance care planning to museum visitor research, with one particularly innovative study by Hilda Reilly (PhD candidate, University of Glasgow). Her work uses narrative to explore the medical concept of hysteria. Reilly talked about the case of Anna von Lieben, one of Freud’s most significant patients. She demonstrated how accounts such as poetry and diaries left by the deceased can form data for analysis and interpretation.

Just a stone’s throw from Glasgow city’s own necropolis or ‘city of the dead’ (pictured), it was a fitting metaphor for one of the key aims of IPA: to make heard the quietest of voices. It let me reflect on the voices which I am working to make heard through my own PhD studentship project; those from successful, persistent students from low-income backgrounds who are under-represented throughout higher education (HE), but have great value in widening participation in HE and as part of a greater commitment to social equality.

Such novel approaches fit well with Dr Michael Larkin’s keynote exploring new developments in design and data collection in IPA research. The lecture and Q&A was particularly relevant to my own research, as it explored less common topic formulations in IPA research; namely when the phenomenon is a background phenomenon or an external theoretical construct (in my case, ‘resilience’). The recommendation to use explicitly narrative and reflective strategies rang true with my own approach to data collection.

Likewise, Professor Jonathan Smith delivered his keynote on personal experience of depression, offering rich, textured accounts of participants. He urged us as researchers to ‘dig deeper’ and ‘mine’ our participant data. In interviews, he reminded us “it is easy to talk to people; it is demanding to get high quality data”. Professor Paul Flowers closed the conference by provoking us to move from questioning ‘where are we now?’ to ‘where do we go from here?’ And, for me at least, this signifies a move towards drawing deep, ‘juicy’ interpretations from my data, to maximise the potential impact of my research.

 

Lizzie Gauntlett

Faculty of Health and Social Sciences

egauntlett@bournemouth.ac.uk

http://staffprofiles.bournemouth.ac.uk/display/i7642194

 

For more on IPA resources, news and networks of support:

www.ipa.bbk.ac.uk