Tagged / photo of the week

Photo of the Week: Understanding Digital Immersion within Streaming and E-Sports

Digital Tethering: Understanding Digital Immersion within Streaming and E-Sports

Our Photo of the Week series features photo entries from our annual Research Photography Competition taken by BU academics, students and professional staff, which gives a glimpse into some of the fantastic research undertaken across the BU community.

This week’s photo of the week is by Charlie Simmons, a final year undergraduate student on a BA (Hons) Business Studies with Marketing programme. This project was co-created with Dr Elvira Bolat, Senior Lecturer in Marketing in the Faculty of Management, and won a prize for the Centre for Excellence in Learning (CEL) co-creation awards. Charlie’s work is around digital tethering, particularly in understanding digital immersion.

Immersion is used outside of digital space as a term to measure the degree of involvement in a specific activity. Digital immersion is now a ubiquitous phenomenon that can be observed in all human activities starting with consumption of services and products as well as professional tasks. Overall academic literature, in particular business and management literature, lacks understanding of digital immersion, perhaps due to methodological challenges associated with researching this area. Using the context of e-sport, this research study revealed that in the context of digital connectivity immersion is not only a feeling but a state of mind; it causes behavioural changes in its e-sport players and keeps them habitually absorbed. At the heart of digital immersion are people, streamers (influencers) and community whom have the power to manipulate individuals’ behaviour.

At the heart of digital immersion is community; the more an individual is experiencing community and feels part of that community, the more likely they are to be immersed in the digital environment. Entertainment within content is also irrelevant to the digital immersion, which is contrary to existing research. Content allows users to escape from reality and forget about real world problems, and learning in combination with community factors found to have a strong and positive impact on digital immersion. Findings of this research have implications beyond its contextual focus, e-sports. Businesses can utilise learning, escape and community effects to improve online presence and stimulate much more meaningful engagement with a digital content.

For more information about this research, please contact Dr Elvira Bolat here.

Digital Me is an online collection of research publications/narratives within the domain of digital, written by BU academics and students. This research covers various disciplines, i.e. management and marketing, health and social science, computing and media, education and more; and spreads through various topics, i.e. digital consumption, digital business, education and digital and more. Find out more here.

Photo of the Week: Welcome to BU from China!

Welcome to BU from China! From the beginning to the end of your studies at BU, let’s focus on the middle bit and the all-important ‘sandwich placement’!

Our Photo of the Week series features photo entries from our annual Research Photography Competition taken by BU academics, students and professional staff, which gives a glimpse into some of the fantastic research undertaken across the BU community.

This week’s photo of the week is a selfie taken by Vianna Renaud (Placement Development Advisor and Postgraduate Researcher, Centre for Excellence in Media Practice) with our Chinese students from Beijing Normal University Zhuhai (BNUZ). BU works closely with BNUZ to give students on a number of undergraduate courses the opportunity to complete their studies with us. In an increasingly global business environment, having the opportunity to study in an international community of academics and students is invaluable in helping to develop global perspective and gain a better understanding of how business is conducted across borders and elsewhere in the world.

With the idea of attending Bournemouth University planted in the minds of Chinese students who have attended the Global Festival of Learning on their home campus, the dream becomes a reality when they find themselves in the UK a few months later. Along with having to adjust to the British higher education system, they must begin looking for a sandwich placement suitable for their academic course which can be a challenging time for them.

Vianna is currently trialling a pilot project where she regularly engages with our BNUZ students on a monthly basis and will research to what degree an impact has been made from this intervention, which will include having coaching conversations, using the GROW Model & informational handouts signposting BU services, as well as encouraging the students to engage in peer-to-peer learning in their preparation for placement year.

“By building upon the relationship BU currently has with BNUZ, combined with the feedback from these students, I am confident we can build our own innovative approach to best support those students that choose BU,” says Vianna.

For more information about this research, please contact Vianna Renaud here.

Photo of the Week: Protest Art for Social Change

Protest Art for Social Change

This week’s photo of the week was taken by Dr Anastasia Veneti and shows how protests and social movements can transform spaces into a form of art.  Our Photo of the Week series features photo entries from our annual Research Photography Competition taken by BU academics, students and professional staff, which gives a glimpse into some of the fantastic research undertaken across the BU community.

From the squares of Athens and Istanbul to the streets of New York and Cairo, social movements have been rising during the 21st century. Contrary to public perceptions of urban protest camps as arenas of violence and confrontation, this research at the 2014 Hong Kong Umbrella Movement indicated that protest camps can transform the city into an open space of massive arts participation. Thousands of protesters, citizens and tourists participated in collaborative arts projects that communicated universal values related to freedom, equality and democracy. The research team suggest that, in an increasingly turbulent world, peaceful and collective protest art has the capacity to empower, unify and motivate people.

Dr Anastasia Veneti is a Senior Lecturer in Marketing Communications at Bournemouth University. For more information about this research, please contact Anastasia here.

Researchers involved: Dr Georgios Patsiaouras (School of Business, University of Leicester), Dr Anastasia Veneti (Faculty of Media and Communication, Bournemouth University), Dr William Green (School of Business, University of Leicester).

The research project was recently published online at the prestigious journal, “Marketing Theory” in August 2017:

Patsiaouras, G., Veneti, A., and Green, W., (2017) Marketing, art and voices of dissent: promotional methods of protest art by the 2014 Hong Kong’s Umbrella Movement. Marketing Theory. Online first: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1470593117724609

Photo of the Week: The TACIT Trial

The TACIT Trial: TAi ChI for people with demenTia

This week’s photo of the week is Dr Samuel Nyman‘s entry of a Tai Chi class in action. This weekly series features photo entries from our annual Research Photography Competition taken by BU academics, students and professional staff, which gives a glimpse into some of the fantastic research undertaken across the BU community.

The TACIT Trial is all about people. The study is undertaken by a team of researchers led by Dr Samuel Nyman at BU who are looking into the benefits of Tai Chi for people with dementia.  Qualified Tai Chi instructors, such as senior instructor Robert Joyce from Elemental Tai Chi (photographed), lead the classes.  The classes are attended by people with dementia and their informal carers.  The classes involve slow, gentle, fluid body movements and slow breathing that leave you feeling relaxed and yet you have exercised your core muscles.  In this randomised controlled trial, we are following up for six months people who have taken part in the classes and practiced at home and are comparing them to others who have not done Tai Chi.  This will provide initial evidence for the first time in the UK as to the benefits of Tai Chi for the health and well-being of people with dementia and their informal carers.  This photo is taken from a workshop for Solent NHS led the the chief investigator Dr Samuel Nyman and Robert Joyce.

You can find out more about the TACIT Trial here:

Webpage: www.bournemouth.ac.uk/tai-chi/

Facebook: www.facebook.com/TheTACITTrial/

Dr Samuel Nyman is a Principal Academic at Bournemouth University. For more information about this research, please contact Samuel here.

 

Photo of the Week: All My Meeples

All My Meeples

Our next Photo of the Week is Alexandra Alberda‘s photo of her drawing of  people engaging with Graphic Medicine comics at a museum exhibition. This weekly series features photo entries taken by our academics, students and professional staff for our annual Research Photography Competition, which gives a glimpse into some of the fantastic research undertaken across the BU community.

Alexandra’s work takes Medical Humanities and Graphic Medicine into non-clinical and public settings where health related works are being engaged with presently. Her research furthers Medical Humanities’ engagement with public perceptions of health by expanding the critical vocabulary available to scholars through Comics Studies and curatorial practice. The space of the museum holds a social identity as upholding and defining culture and has a history of exhibiting works that relate to healthcare and the “ill” other/body. How do these bodies and the experiences they illustrate reach our own interpretations of illness, flesh bodies, and lived experiences? Alexandra’s PhD research focuses on these experiences as they are tied to exhibitions and museums, which creates three groups of ‘people’ to the research.

The first group (green) are the people that exist in the museum: viewers, artists, curators, and other museum staff. The second group (pink) are the people represented in the exhibition artwork: both fictional and non-fiction characters in the case of memoirs. Her research focuses on the relationships and engagement that happens between the first and second groups. The third group (orange) involves the relationships between my supervisors, and their expertise, and Alexandra. These relationships will translate into her professional practices and research skills.

Alexandra Alberda is a PhD researcher in the Faculty of Media and Communication at Bournemouth University. Her supervisors are Dr. Sam Goodman, Dr. Julia Round and Professor Michael Wilmore. She received her MA in Art History minoring in Sculptural Painting/Studio Art at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and BA in English and Art minoring in Honours, Art History and Writing at Briar Cliff University.

Find out more about the role that comics can play in the study and delivery of healthcare on the Graphic Medicine website here.

@ZandraAlberda

Photo of the Week: The researcher as tourist: “Photographing the photographer”

The researcher as tourist: “Photographing the photographer”

Our next Photo of the Week is Edwin van Teijlingen‘s photo taken in the Nawalparasi district of Nepal. This weekly series features photo entries taken by our academics, students and professional staff for our annual Research Photography Competition, which gives a glimpse into some of the fantastic research undertaken across the BU community.

In early 2017, Bournemouth University led the last of six one-day training sessions in Nepal. This project in improving maternal mental health involved bringing UK volunteers to this South-Asian country to do the training.  The training was conducted jointly by UK volunteers and Nepali-speaking trainers and translators. The project, under the Health Partnership Scheme (HPS), was funded by the UK Department for International Development (DfID) and managed by THET (Tropical Health & Education Trust).

The project centred on Auxiliary Nurse Midwives working in birthing centres in Nawalparasi.  This is relatively poor a district in the south of Nepal, bordering India.  Since the training site was very close to Lumbini, the birthplace of Buddha, we always tried to take volunteers there for a visit.  This photo was taken just outside of the main building (not in view).  It shows many Nepali visitors to the site trying to get a photograph of, or be in a photograph with, our fair-haired Scottish volunteer, Dr. Flora Douglas.

Edwin van Teijlingen is a Professor of Reproduction Health. For more information about this research, please contact Edwin here.

@EVanTeijlingen

Photo of the Week: Surviving the advertising apocalypse with RAISA

Surviving the advertising apocalypse with RAISA (Robotics, Artifical Intelligence, Service Automation)

Our Photo of the Week series has returned and we’re kicking off with Elizabeth Falkowska’s research photo in collaboration with Dr Elvira Bolat (Senior Lecturer in Marketing) for this project.

This weekly series features photo entries taken by our academics, students and professional staff for our annual Research Photography Competition, which gives a glimpse into some of the fantastic research undertaken across the BU community.

A 2016 World Economic Forum report has predicted that more than five million jobs will be lost to automation and robots by 2020. This causes unease for people within marketing and creative firms who are already struggling to survive an ‘advertising apocalypse’ due to digital transformation of business, consumption and communication. This project founds that to avoid disruption and enable creative agencies focus on doing what they are great at – creative idea generation – relationship resources are critical to RAISA complex ecosystems where companies like Microsoft become an important partner for creative agencies for successful deployment of RAISA.

Elizabeth Falkowska is a final year undergraduate student in BA (Hons) Business Studies with Marketing. For more information about this research, please contact Dr Elvira Bolat.

Photo of the Week: Of trees, climate, palm oil, primates and elephants

Of trees, climate, palm oil, primates and elephants

Of trees, climate, palm oil, primates and elephants

Our next instalment of the ‘Photo of the Week’ series features Dr Amanda Korstjens’ image of Sikundur, in the Leuser Ecosystem, North Sumatra.  The series is a weekly instalment which features an image taken by our fantastic BU staff and students. The photos give a glimpse into some of the fascinating work our researchers have been doing across BU and the wider community.

The Leuser ecosystem is the last stronghold of the Sumatran rhino, tiger, elephant and orang-utan. Levels of human-wildlife conflict and hunting are growing and the ecosystem is being destroyed at an alarming rate.  The Life and Environmental Sciences’ Landscape Ecology and Primatology (LEAP) team have partnered up with local conservation leaders to investigate the effect these environmental changes have.

Pictured above is Sikundur, in North Sumatra where the LEAP team are carrying out research into vegetation structure, micro-climates, and primate & elephant habitats. LEAP bring scientific understanding of how landscape scale changes to the environment affect forest structure and local micro-climate and look at how climate change may alter the survival chances of primates and elephants. LEAP’s impact aim is to provide scientifically sound underpinnings to develop mitigation strategies.

In April 2017 Dr Korstjens featured in American radio/internet show ‘The Global Journalist’ which can be viewed here.

If you’d like find out more about the research or the photo itself then please contact Dr Korstjens.

This photo was originally an entry in the 2017 Research Photography Competition. If you have any other questions about the Photo of the Week series or the competition please email research@bournemouth.ac.uk

Photo of the Week: Birthing centre in Nawalparasi, rural Nepal

Birthing centre in Nawalparasi, rural Nepal

Birthing centre in Nawalparasi, rural Nepal 

Our next instalment of the ‘Photo of the Week’ series features Professor Edwin van Teijlingen’s image of a birthing centre in rural Nepal.  The series is a weekly instalment, which features an image taken by our fantastic BU staff and students. The photos give a glimpse into some of the fascinating work our researchers have been doing across BU and the wider community.

The Centre for Midwifery, Maternal & Perinatal Health (CMMPH) visited one of the poorest parts of rural Nawalparasi District, Nepal to carry out fieldwork. The team visited a birthing centre at the health post in Thulo Khairatawa.  The photo shows the delivery room. It may look bare and basic to a westerner, but it is a major improvement compared to the situation a few years ago, thanks to financial support from Green Tara UK and Karuna Germany and health promotion support from Green Tara Nepal.

Research conducted by the CMMPH at BU evaluates the impact of (a) a health promotion intervention in the community around the birthing centre; and (b) training the maternity care providers in rural birthing centres of Nawalparasi. One obvious impact to date is the increasing number of rural women giving birth in small birthing units such as this one.

If you’d like find out more about the research or the photo itself then please contact Professor van Teijlingen

This photo was originally an entry in the 2017 Research Photography Competition. If you have any other questions about the Photo of the Week series or the competition please email research@bournemouth.ac.uk

Photo of the Week: Tracks in the sand- tracking criminals

Tracks in the sand: tracking criminals

Tracks in the sand: tracking criminals

Our next instalment of the ‘Photo of the Week’ series features Professor Matthew Bennett’s image footprints in the sand, which represents his research into tracking criminals.  The series is a weekly instalment, which features an image taken by our fantastic BU staff and students. The photos give a glimpse into some of the fascinating work our researchers have been doing across BU and the wider community.

Within our lives we leave thousands of individual footprints – in the snow, on the beach, in the park and sometimes even muddy prints on the kitchen floor!  Tracks are more numerous than any other form of trace evidence, and record a unique snap shot in time about the track-maker.  Not only do they record details of the shoes worn, but information about our body mass, style of walking and the specific wear on the soles of our shoes that record information about the history of our footfall.  Reading these clues digitally provides an important forensic tools and HEIF-funded BU research (www.DigTrace.co.uk) in this area is shaping forensic practice both in the UK and overseas.

If you’d like find out more about the research or the photo itself then please contact Professor Bennett.

This photo was originally an entry in the 2017 Research Photography Competition. If you have any other questions about the Photo of the Week series or the competition please email research@bournemouth.ac.uk

Photo of the Week: Our Experience: My Voice, My Story

Our Experience: My Voice, My Story

Our Experience: My Voice, My Story

Our next instalment of the ‘Photo of the Week’ series features Dr Maggie Hutchings image which represents BU’s Fair Access Research Project in action.  The series is a weekly instalment, which features an image taken by our fantastic BU staff and students. The photos give a glimpse into some of the fascinating work our researchers have been doing across BU and the wider community.

The Fair Access Research project brings together students and staff from across the university to develop research knowledge and expertise in the field of fair access to higher education. The team are developing an understanding of the challenges some students face in accessing and succeeding in university, how university is experienced by different groups of students and how the university can support them. The impact of the research will be felt by students and academics across the university as awareness is raised and a shift in culture is felt over time.

The photo voice method was used by BU students participating in the ‘My Voice, My Story’ research project to produce images and ‘stories’ about their experiences of being a non-traditional student. Students co-created their stories and were invited to share their experiences at an ESRC Festival of Social Sciences workshop with an invited audience of academics and widening participation practitioners. The image shows the participants’ reflections captured at the workshop through interpretations written on the table-cloths, and contributing to the data for the research. Insights were gained into the effects of arts-based social participatory research methods for eliciting deep stories to inform policy and practice.

If you’d like find out more about the research or the photo itself then please contact Dr Hutchings or Dr Vanessa Heaslip or Dr Clive Hunt who are leading the Fair Access Research Project.

This photo was originally an entry in the 2017 Research Photography Competition. If you have any other questions about the Photo of the Week series or the competition please email research@bournemouth.ac.uk

Photo of the Week: Baltic Pride: The visibility of LGBT human rights claiming

Baltic Pride: The visibility of LGBT human rights claiming

Baltic Pride: The visibility of LGBT human rights claiming

Our next instalment of the ‘Photo of the Week’ series features Dr Jayne Caudwell’s image of a Pride bus in Baltic Pride 2016.  The series is a weekly instalment, which features an image taken by our fantastic BU staff and students. The photos give a glimpse into some of the fascinating work our researchers have been doing across BU and the wider community.

This research project focuses on Baltic Pride 2016 and the politics of LGBTQ visibility. Pride parades can be important for the advocacy of LGBT human rights claims. Prides take place across the world and their histories and scales vary enormously. Some adopt en-mass celebration and carnivalesque styles, whilst others face severe opposition. Global manifestations of Pride are uneven and yet, they are connected. Many take place around the month of June because of the legacies of USA-based LGBT liberation triggered by the Stonewall Riots on June 29th, 1969 in Greenwich Village, and most rely on rainbow flags, LGBTQ-positive banners and slogans to carry the politics of global Pride.

The research explores the transnational flow of the Pride movement and associated universal human rights claims through the visuals of Baltic Pride 2016.

If you’d like find out more about the research or the photo itself then please contact Dr Caudwell.

This photo was originally an entry in the 2017 Research Photography Competition. If you have any other questions about the Photo of the Week series or the competition please email research@bournemouth.ac.uk.

Photo of the Week: ‘LandEscapes – Treading on the line of fantasy and realism’ – A high dynamic range landscape photography exhibition at the Bournemouth International Centre

‘LandEscapes - Treading on the line of fantasy and realism' - A high dynamic range landscape photography exhibition at the Bournemouth International Centre

‘LandEscapes – Treading on the line of fantasy and realism’ – A high dynamic range landscape photography exhibition at the Bournemouth International Centre

Our next instalment of the ‘Photo of the Week’ series features Rehan Zia’s exhibition ‘LandEscapes- Treading on the line of fantasy and realism’.  The series is a weekly instalment, which features an image taken by our fantastic BU staff and students. The photos give a glimpse into some of the fascinating work our researchers have been doing across BU and the wider community.

“My practice-led research is looking at exploring the best practice in high dynamic range landscape photography. I often exhibit images that I have created to acquire feedback that I could subsequently reflect upon. This image shows my latest and biggest exhibition ‘ LandEscapes – Treading on the line of fantasy and realism’ at the Bournemouth International Centre (BIC) where 35 of my images were on display from 6 December 2016 – 12 January 2017,” explains Rehan.

If you’d like find out more about the research or the photo itself then please contact Rehan.

This photo was originally entry to the 2017 Research Photography Competition. If you have any other questions about the Photo of the Week series or the competition please email research@bournemouth.ac.uk

Photo of the Week: Loxodes rex- The ‘King’ of Tropical Microbes

Loxodes rex- The ‘King’ of Tropical Microbes

Loxodes rex– The ‘King’ of Tropical Microbes

Our next instalment of the ‘Photo of the Week’ series features Hunter N. Hines’s image of the freshwater species Loxodes rex.  The series is a weekly instalment, which features an image taken by our fantastic BU staff and students. The photos give a glimpse into some of the fascinating work our researchers have been doing across BU and the wider community.

Loxodes rex is a flagship freshwater ciliate species, a large eukaryotic organism that is a single cell. The photomicrograph is an image taken in Florida (USA), using 100x magnification. This species was long believed to exist only in Tropical Africa.

This research into flagship species in new global regions questions the ideas of microbial biogeography and dispersal.  This species is 1,200µm long (1.2 millimetres!) and visible to the naked eye. The large mouth is at the top left of the image and you can see numerous food items within the cell. The many lines running down the cell are ciliary rows, which are used for swimming.

Further research into the project will reveal more flagship species in novel regions, and could uncover species which are new to the science world.

If you’d like find out more about the research or the photo itself then please contact Hunter.

This photo was originally an entry to the 2017 Research Photography Competition. If you have any other questions about the Photo of the Week series or the competition please email research@bournemouth.ac.uk

Photo of the Week: Archaeology: Hidden Landscapes

Archaeology: Hidden Landscapes

Archaeology: Hidden Landscapes

Our next instalment of the ‘Photo of the Week’ series features Ashely Green’s image which presents one of the key stages in surveying a site- georeferencing.  The series is a weekly instalment, which features an image taken by our fantastic BU staff and students. The photos give a glimpse into some of the fascinating work our researchers have been doing across BU and the wider community.

Ashely’s research is looking at the potential to detect burials prior to archaeological excavation. She is doing this by producing software that automatically detects grave-like responses in geophysical collections of data. The software will use data from sites across Ireland and South-West England to describe the geophysical signatures of medieval burial practices. These sites are surveyed at a high-resolution with a range of techniques to determine what lies beneath the ground surface and how this may affect the detection of burials.  This research aims to lessen the negative impact of modern activities on these burial sites.

This photo presents a key stage in surveying a site – georeferencing, where the survey grids and elevation profile coordinates are recorded to be associated with the corresponding geophysical data.

If you’d like find out more about the research or the photo itself then please contact Ashely.

This photo was originally an entry to the 2017 Research Photography Competition. If you have any other questions about the Photo of the Week series or the competition please email research@bournemouth.ac.uk

Photo of the Week: Pollen from a Bumblebee

Pollen from a Bumblebee

Pollen from a Bumblebee

Our next instalment of the ‘Photo of the Week’ series features Dr Paul Hartley’s image of the pollen from a bumblebee.  The series is a weekly instalment, which features an image taken by our fantastic BU staff and students. The photos give a glimpse into some of the fascinating work our researchers have been doing across BU and the wider community.

The image shows optical sections through a marsh thistle pollen grain taken using a Leica SP8 confocal microscope. Pollen grains have a morphology unique to the flowers they originate from.

Researchers in the Department of Life and Environmental Science are using this principal to establish the foraging range of bumblebees and other important pollinators. This grain of marsh thistle pollen was collected from the pollen sacks of bumblebees foraging in the Purbeck lowland heaths. Marsh thistle was not recorded in the vicinity of the bee but was recorded further afield. This illustrates that bumblebees use multiple habitat areas and wide foraging ranges to find their preferred resources.

This research supports and guides important questions regarding ecology as well as strategies to conserve a wide range of important pollinators.

If you’d like find out more about the research or the photo itself then please contact Dr Hartley.

This photo was originally an entry in the 2017 Research Photography Competition. If you have any other questions about the Photo of the Week series or the competition please email research@bournemouth.ac.uk

Photo of the Week: This is me. I am Ron.

This is me. I am Ron.

This is me. I am Ron.

Our next instalment of the ‘Photo of the Week’ series features Chantel Cox‘s image of a man named Ron.  The series is a weekly instalment, which features an image taken by our fantastic BU staff and students. The photos give a glimpse into some of the fascinating work our researchers have been doing across BU and the wider community.

Chantel explains her research and why she chose to capture a picture of Ron:

“My research is looking at the cultural processes that underpin healthcare professionals meeting the identity needs of frail older people.  It is known that a ‘loss of identity’ in a person may lead to poorer health outcomes and/or reduced engagement in therapy,”

“This photo is of Ron. I met him as I was walking past a café where he was sat outside dressed as Santa, in December. What struck me about Ron was his confidence and how he enjoys dressing up because more people engage with him. When asked to describe himself he said “I’m 68, retired and very disabled”. Despite this, he is able to support his identity needs through his physical dress. I hope that my research will enable more people like Ron to be supported in the future,” says Chantel.

If you’d like find out more about the research or the photo itself then please contact Chantel.

This photo was originally the winner of the 2017 Research Photography Competition. If you have any other questions about the Photo of the Week series or the competition please email research@bournemouth.ac.uk

Photo of the Week: Zooming in on Dietary Differences

Zooming in on Dietary Differences

Zooming in on Dietary Differences

Our next instalment of the ‘Photo of the Week’ series features Catherine Gutmann Roberts’ image of her research into the dietary differences of different species of fish.  The series is a weekly instalment, which features an image taken by our fantastic BU staff and students. The photos give a glimpse into some of the fascinating work our researchers have been doing across BU and the wider community.

This photo shows a caddisfly larva and a chironomid (non-biting midge) larva, just a couple of the macroinvertebrates, which were extracted from a young barbel gut. Barbel (Barbus barbus) is a species of fish that has been relocated from Eastern flowing rivers to Western flowing rivers in England for the purpose of recreational angling. This research will measure the dietary overlap and potential competition between the barbel and its native conspecifics, chub (Squalis cephalus), dace (Leuciscus leuciscus) and minnow (Phoxinus phoxinus). It will also determine which other factors affect diet, such as location, size of fish and their stage of development.

If you’d like find out more about the research or the photo itself then please contact Catherine.

This photo was originally an entry in the 2017 Research Photography Competition. If you have any other questions about the Photo of the Week series or the competition please email research@bournemouth.ac.uk