Category / conferences

PGR Virtual Poster Exhibition | Kelsie Fletcher

Poster Exhibition | The 12th Annual Postgraduate Research Conference 

Kelsie Fletcher, PhD student in the Faculty of Haealth & Social Sciences with this poster entitled:

The history of disaster nursing: developments from Nightingale to the 21st century.

 

Click the poster below to enlarge.

Background: Nurses have a rich history in performing their duty both domestically and internationally in response to a disaster. Comprising the largest proportion of the healthcare workforce, nurses can inform disaster planning and management. With continuing conflict, humanitarian and natural disasters, epidemics and ongoing threat from covid-19, nurses’ roles and capacity to respond to global health needs is critical. Aims: The aim of this poster is to demonstrate key developments in the field of disaster nursing. Methods: A qualitative historical review was conducted to examine core developments in the history of disaster nursing. Results: A total of 10 articles refer to disaster nursing specifically, of which 4 of these are reports/policy. Conclusions: The complex but rich history of disaster nursing is interwoven throughout the historical literature. Understanding the developments of this newly recognised specialty field can inform future research agendas and this can inform the mitigation, prevention, response and recovery phases of disaster management.

 

You can view the full poster exhibition on the conference webpage.

 


If this research has inspired you and you’d like to explore applying for a research degree please visit the postgraduate research web pages or contact our dedicated admissions team.

 

 

PGR Virtual Poster Exhibition | Madhu Sapkota

Poster Exhibition | The 12th Annual Postgraduate Research Conference 

Madhu Sapkota, PhD student in the Faculty of Science & Technology with this poster entitled:

Adaptive Simulation Modelling using the Digital Twin Paradigm.

 

Click the poster below to enlarge.

The simulation model used while undertaking the Structural Health Management (SHM) task to predict the response of the system/structure(s) to disturbances, got phase-out when the real system/structure material properties changes in non-uniform and complex way. In order to accurately predict future states of a system/ structure, which can change its behaviour to a large degree in response to environmental influences, the existence of precise models of the system and its surroundings is demandable. For this, simulation modelling within DT paradigm concept is proposed, with DT encompassing continuous and automatic model updating framework, reducing the computational (parametric) uncertainties that arises with time in the process and ultimately having a lifetime reliable prognosis tool for the structural behaviour. The solver (algorithm/framework) will be tested with a real-world problem by setting a DT environment integrated with an ultra-high-fidelity simulation model (for eg: cathodic protection (CP) model built for the prediction of the corrosion status of a seastructure).

 

You can view the full poster exhibition on the conference webpage.

 


If this research has inspired you and you’d like to explore applying for a research degree please visit the postgraduate research web pages or contact our dedicated admissions team.

 

 

PGR Virtual Poster Exhibition | Jessica Doherty

Poster Exhibition | The 12th Annual Postgraduate Research Conference 

Jessica Doherty, PhD student in the Faculty of Health & Social Sciences with this poster entitled:

A Pilot Study to Improve emotional well-being of Early Career Midwives: A Modified Dialectical Behavioural Therapy Skills Training Group Intervention.

 

Click the poster below to enlarge.

Early career midwives are at the highest risk of leaving the profession in the first 5 years of practice. Targeting the emotional labour and burnout relationship may alter this trajectory by equipping them with emotional toolkit and skills to manage their relationships in practice and improve their resilience to workplace-adversity. This pilot is a non-randomised two-phased sequential mixed-method design comprising of pre, post-test and three-month follow-up to explore the preliminary effectiveness of the intervention via standardised-measures of emotional labour, difficulties of emotional regulation, Mayer, Salovey and Caruso’s emotional intelligence, resilience at work and Maslach’s Burnout Inventory in the first phase. Qualitative semi-structured interviews will be conducted in the second phase to explore the feasibility, acceptability, applicability of the intervention and DBT skills in practice. This study is the first to test DBT Skills training in the midwifery profession.

 

 

You can view the full poster exhibition on the conference webpage.

 


If this research has inspired you and you’d like to explore applying for a research degree please visit the postgraduate research web pages or contact our dedicated admissions team.

 

 

PGR Virtual Poster Exhibition | Chloe Casey

Poster Exhibition | The 12th Annual Postgraduate Research Conference 

Chloe Casey, PhD student in the Faculty of Health & Social Sciences with this poster entitled:

Initiatives to promote the wellbeing of postgraduate researchers at Bournemouth University.

 

Click the poster below to enlarge.

In relation to wellbeing support, in the past there has been the assumption that what works for undergraduate students will also work for postgraduate researchers (PGRs). As a result, a lack of interventions published in the literature have been designed and evaluated specifically with PGRs in mind. Due to this, universities have previously embedded support provisions that may not have been relevant for PGRs. There is a need to investigate the type of interventions that will be best aligned to the specific needs of PGRs. Therefore, this Doctoral College supported PhD project aims to design, trial, and evaluate evidence-based initiatives that are co-produced with PGRs. This poster provides an overview of the initiatives that have been trialled as part of this project, including a peer-support area on Brightspace and a series of workshops (project planning, mindfulness and mentoring) focusing on methods to help PGRs cope with the stresses of research.

 

You can view the full poster exhibition on the conference webpage.

 


If this research has inspired you and you’d like to explore applying for a research degree please visit the postgraduate research web pages or contact our dedicated admissions team.

 

 

PGR Virtual Poster Exhibition | Natalie Stewart

Poster Exhibition | The 12th Annual Postgraduate Research Conference 

Natalie Stewart, PhD student in the BU Business School with this poster entitled:

Promoting a positive and cohesive research culture for postgraduate researchers.

 

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Research culture is thought to be a substantive influencer in the overall student experience for postgraduate researchers (PGRs) in the UK Higher Education sector. In consecutive AdvanceHE Postgraduate Research Experience Survey (PRES), findings highlight over a third of responding PGRs are expressing dissatisfaction with their experience of the research culture at their own university (AdvanceHE 2019). Research culture is reported to be less positively experienced in seven core areas measured which includes, supervision, resources, progress and assessment, responsibilities, research skills and professional development. The aim of this research is to explore ways in which higher education institutions can actively create and influence more positive research cultures for their PGRs, who are working across a wide range of potential discipline areas. This poster outlines the rationale for this research and anticipated approach.

 

 

You can view the full poster exhibition on the conference webpage.

 


If this research has inspired you and you’d like to explore applying for a research degree please visit the postgraduate research web pages or contact our dedicated admissions team.

 

 

PGR Virtual Poster Exhibition | Sulochanan Dhakal-Rai

Poster Exhibition | The 12th Annual Postgraduate Research Conference 

Sulochanan Dhakal-Rai, PhD student in the Faculty of Health & Social Sciences with this poster entitled:

Factors contributing to rising caesarean section rates in South Asian Countries: a systematic review.

 

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Background: Caesarean Sections (CS) can save a mother’s life in childbirth but can also be an unnecessary medical intervention in a natural process. This systematic review investigates factors/indicators affecting increasing Caesarean Section rates in South Asia. Methods: Quantitative studies published from 2010 to 2018 were found on electronic databases. Critical Appraisal Skill Programme checklists were used for assessing the quality. Narrative synthesis of the indications/factors associated with CS was divided into distinct categories using content analysis. Results: Sixty-eight studies were included and both CS indications and significant associated factors were explored. The most common medical indications of CS were foetal distress and previous CS. Higher maternal age was the most common associated factor followed by higher education and urban residency. Maternal request was the most common non-medical indication of CS. Conclusion: Modifiable indicators/factors reflect global trends, suggesting we need a global strategy to stem the rise of unnecessary CS.

 

You can view the full poster exhibition on the conference webpage.

 


If this research has inspired you and you’d like to explore applying for a research degree please visit the postgraduate research web pages or contact our dedicated admissions team.

 

 

PGR Virtual Poster Exhibition | Greg Tansill

Poster Exhibition | The 12th Annual Postgraduate Research Conference 

Greg Tansil, MRes student in the Faculty of Science & Technology with this poster entitled:

Study to identify risk factors that predict which children will repeatedly go missing.

Click the poster below to enlarge.

Missing children face significant risks and those who frequently go missing are particularly vulnerable to dangers such as abuse and sexual exploitation. Using data from one UK police force from June 2018 to July 2019 (N = 909), the research found; (1) over 80% of all missing child reports are repeat disappearances; (2) a small proportion of children who go missing repeatedly (8.3%) account for over half of all missing person episodes; (3) the likelihood of a child going missing on multiple occasions is associated with being criminally exploited, being a perpetrator of violence, adverse childhood experiences, being arrested and being in care; and (4) by combining these factors it is possible to predict the probability of a child going missing repeatedly. Understanding of the correlates of repeat disappearances allows the police and partner agencies to target preventative resources to those individuals most at risk of going missing again.

 

 

You can view the full poster exhibition on the conference webpage.

 


If this research has inspired you and you’d like to explore applying for a research degree please visit the postgraduate research web pages or contact our dedicated admissions team.

 

 

PGR Virtual Poster Exhibition | Raysa El Zein

Poster Exhibition | The 12th Annual Postgraduate Research Conference 

 

Raysa El Zein, PhD student in the Faculty of Health & Social Sciences with this poster entitled:

Feasibility study: effect of vegetable oil on memory in older-adults and those with MCI.

 

Click the poster below to enlarge.

Associations between diet and cognitive impairments in older-adults have been demonstrated in some studies. Inducing ketosis to provide an alternative energy source (ketones) by modifying the amount and type of dietary fat could reduce neuro-degeneration in older-adults. The aim of this feasibility study was to use a dietary intervention to investigate the effect of coconut oil intake (compared with sunflower oil) on cognition and quality of life in older-adults and those with Mild Cognitive Impairment. The study followed a randomized clinical trial design and participants were allocated either coconut oil or sunflower oil for 6 months. To date, data has been collected from 18 participants using questionnaires, interviews, food records, cognitive tests and blood ketone tests. Preliminary results from this study demonstrate the ability of participants to adhere to the dietary intervention and the potential effect of coconut oil intake in improving verbal memory in older-adults and those with MCI.

 

 

You can view the full poster exhibition on the conference webpage.

 


If this research has inspired you and you’d like to explore applying for a research degree please visit the postgraduate research web pages or contact our dedicated admissions team.

 

 

Today! The 12th Annual Postgraduate Research Conference

Today is the day, the 12th Annual Postgraduate Research Conference hosted by the Doctoral College. 

You can still register to attend any of the oral presentation session and of course view the virtual poster exhibition on the website.

View the full conference brochure.

I look forward to sharing this showcase of postgraduate research with many of you.

PGR Virtual Poster Exhibition | Debora Almeida

Poster Exhibition | The 12th Annual Postgraduate Research Conference 

Debora Almedia, PhD student in the Faculty of Health & Social Sciences with this poster entitled:

Is there a difference between dominant and non-dominant hand performance during simulated infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation (iCPR)?

Click the poster below to enlarge.

Randomised study to compare two-finger technique (TFT) using dominant (DH) and non-dominant hand (NH) during simulated iCPR. Materials/methods: 24 participants performed 3-minute iCPR using the TFT with DH or NH followed by 3-minute iCPR with their other hand. Perceived fatigue rated using visual analogue scale (VAS). Results: No significant difference between DH and NH. However, perception of fatigue for NH (76.8 ±13.4) was significantly higher (p <.001) compared to DH (62.8 ±12.5). No significant difference between first and last 30 seconds of iCPR for DH and NH. No significant correlations between iCPR and perception of fatigue for DH. However, significant correlation for CR (r=0.43; p=0.040) and RL (r=-0.48; p=0.021) for the NH. Conclusion: No difference in performance of iCPR with DH versus NH. However, perception of fatigue is higher in NH for CR and RL. Guidelines could recommend rescuers to change hands every 2 min to reduce effects of fatigue on
performance.

 

 

You can view the full poster exhibition on the conference webpage.

 


If this research has inspired you and you’d like to explore applying for a research degree please visit the postgraduate research web pages or contact our dedicated admissions team.

 

 

PGR Virtual Poster Exhibition | Rachel Clarke

Poster Exhibition | The 12th Annual Postgraduate Research Conference 

Rachel Clarke, MRes student in the BU Business School with this poster entitled:

Leadership as a means of cultivating innovation: analogue people in a digital future.

Click the poster below to enlarge.

 

This research study considers how innovation is successfully nurtured within the UK small and medium sized business (SME) environment, and if leadership styles have a role to play when successfully cultivating an innovative culture within such SMEs. Furthermore, the research is investigating the tools that UK SMEs need to adopt to be able to successfully innovate. The research is a two-stage qualitative interview-based study in which data is collected from professional employees of identified SMEs within specific sectors. The participants are interviewed on their own, and then as part of a larger focus group, to enable the expansion of ideas and concepts presented. This research forms part of an emerging field of leadership within a practical context and contributes to the emerging knowledge of leadership, leadership styles, and innovation.

 

 

You can view the full poster exhibition on the conference webpage.

 


If this research has inspired you and you’d like to explore applying for a research degree please visit the postgraduate research web pages or contact our dedicated admissions team.

 

 

PGR Virtual Poster Exhibition | Carrie Tbaily

Poster Exhibition | The 12th Annual Postgraduate Research Conference 

Carrie Tbaily, MRes student in the Faculty of Health & Social Sciences with this poster entitled:

Exploring caregiver perspectives of adults with Severe or Profound and multiple Learning Disabilities Accessing Sedentary Hydrotherapy (SPLASH study)

Click the poster below to enlarge.

The term Learning Disability (LD) defines people with significant impairment in cognition and social functioning. Physical disability in LD is largely neurological. Previous neuro-hydrotherapy studies have adopted a medical model of disability. Taking a singular medical/social approach to LD research omits significant elements of impairment that these adults experience. The biopsychosocial model is therefore the most appropriate approach in regards to LD research. Through asking how caregivers perceive hydrotherapy to impact on the needs of adults with severe/profound LD, this mixed-methods pragmatist study seeks to explore caregiver experience, and identify any health/social care impacts. Using component design, caregiver experiences will be explored through thematic analysis of data gathered from in-depth semi-structured interviews and questionnaires. The themes explored through this study may help to better inform caregiver decision making in relation to hydrotherapy care-plans, and any biopsychosocial impacts highlighted could form the foundation for future studies to further explore/quantitatively measure.

 

You can view the full poster exhibition on the conference webpage.

 


If this research has inspired you and you’d like to explore applying for a research degree please visit the postgraduate research web pages or contact our dedicated admissions team.

PGR Virtual Poster Exhibition | Karim Khaled

Poster Exhibition | The 12th Annual Postgraduate Research Conference 

Karim Khaled, PhD student in the Faculty of Health & Social Sciences with this poster entitled:

Validation of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer (EPIC) Food Frequency Questionnaire for use among Adults in Lebanon

Click the poster below to enlarge.

The aim of this study was to validate the EPIC food frequency questionnaire in Lebanon. The validation was done by comparing data collected from the EPIC FFQ with that collected from three 24-hour recalls. Unadjusted and energy adjusted correlations, Bland Altman plots, and weighed kappa statistics were used to assess the agreement between the two methods. Unadjusted and energy-adjusted correlation coefficients ranged from -0.002 (vitamin A) to 0.337 (carbohydrates) and were all statistically significant except for vitamin D, vitamin E, vitamin A, selenium, and niacin. The weighed kappa estimates for unadjusted data ranged from -0.05 (vitamin C) to 0.248 (magnesium). Weighed kappa for energy-adjusted data ranged from -0.034 (vitamin A) to 0.203 (phosphorus). The visual inspection of the Bland-Altman plots revealed over-estimation of energy, carbohydrates, protein, and fat intakes by the FFQ method. This validation study demonstrated an overall acceptable agreement compared to the 24-h recall method.

 

 

You can view the full poster exhibition on the conference webpage.

 


If this research has inspired you and you’d like to explore applying for a research degree please visit the postgraduate research web pages or contact our dedicated admissions team.

 

 

PGR Virtual Poster Exhibition

PGR Virtual Poster Exhibition

Tomorrow kicks off the PGR Virtual Poster Exhibition. Over the next two weeks we will be highlighting the PGR posters submitted as part of the 12th Annual Postgraduate Research Conference across the research and faculty blogs.

You can also view the full poster exhibition on the conference webpage.

There is still time to register to attend the conference oral presentations and keynote talk, taking place on Wednesday 2 December. All BU students & staff are welcome.

If any of this research inspires you to undertake your own research degree, please do get in touch with our dedicated admissions team.

The 12th Annual Postgraduate Research Conference Brochure

The 12th Annual Postgraduate Research Conference Brochure

I am delighted to be able to share the full conference brochure for The 12th Annual Postgraduate Research Conference.

The oral presentations are taking place virtually on Wednesday 2 November and there is still plenty of time to register to attend. We will also be joined by Professor Edwin van Teijlingen as our keynote speaker.

Register to attend, all BU staff and students welcome. 

All posters will be available for viewing on the conference webpage from Monday 30 November, with wider coverage across the research and Faculty blogs highlighting individual posters over the course of a few weeks.

I look forward to sharing the day with many of you.