Category / PG research

This part of the blog features news and information for postgraduate research students and supervisors

BU Research Blog Exclusive: Design & Look of eBU leaked

The first screenshot of the eBU interface has been exclusively leaked to the BU Research Blog, and is expected to go viral across the BU community over the next week.

eBU will provide both an internal and external forum for the development of research papers by undergraduate to Professor around the eight BU research themes:

–          Creative & Digital Economies

–          Culture & Society

–          Entrepreneurship & Economic Growth

–          Environmental Change & Biodiversity

–          Green Economy & Sustainability  

–          Health, Wellbeing & Ageing 

–          Leisure & Recreation

–          Technology & Design

Submissions will be open to immediate publication (in a safe internal environment) and open peer review by 2 appropriate BU academics. Authors will be encouraged to act upon these reviews by either reworking papers for submission to an external journal or by opting for publication on the external eBU site.

For BU academics this is a great opportunity to get critical appraisal on your research papers or ideas from colleagues. For academics it also an opportunity to encourage the submission of high quality student output, and possibly to facilitate the co-creation and co-production of publishable material to an external journal or to publish externally with eBU. For students, this is a fantastic opportunity to turn high quality essays or dissertations into scholarly outputs, which will be attractive to employers across many sectors and industries.

If you have any questions or would like to become involved in this exciting venture, please get in touch with me via email aharding@bournemouth.ac.uk or by telephone 01202 963025.

Publish empirical or experimental data early whilst letting theory mature?

My colleagues and I have written several papers to help budding researchers about the process of writing and publishing academic papers (Hundley, & van Teijlingen 2002; van Teijlingen 2004; Pitchforth et al. 2005; van Teijlingen et al. 2012; Simkhada et al. 2013). For all researchers – students and staff alike publishing research findings is important as new insights will add to the existing knowledge base, advance the academic discipline and, in the case of applied research, perhaps improve something in the lives of others such as, well-being, the economy or the environment. Apart from this general/altruistic drive to add to knowledge, the advice academics give our postgraduate students is: to get your study published as soon as possible. The two main reasons for publishing early are: (a) getting into print to potentially help your careers; and (b) staking once claim as an authority in the field and/or publishing your findings before someone else does.
As always there are exceptions to the rule. As academics we agree that trying to get into print early is a good personal strategy for an early researcher or a postgraduate student especially for those working with empirical or experimental data. However, occasionally it is better to wait and give the underlying idea in the paper time to develop and mature. The kind of paper that often improves with time is one based on theory. Let me share a personal example: a theoretical paper from my PhD (awarded by the University of Aberdeen in 1994). This paper started life as a theory chapter in my PhD thesis (van Teijlingen 1994). This chapter on models of maternity care was not the strongest part of my thesis and it took me another decade of fine-tuning to get it into a state worth publishing. The paper ‘A Critical Analysis of the Medical Model as used in the Study of Pregnancy and Childbirth’ was finally published in Sociological Research Online, the original online-only Sociology journal in the world (van Teijlingen 2005). The wait was worthwhile as the paper is today (May 2013), eight year after publication, the seventh ‘most viewed articles during the past eight weeks’ in the journal (see: http://www.socresonline.org.uk/stats/top20.html).
In conclusion, it is generally sound advice to new researchers and postgraduate students to publish early. Occasionally though, waiting and giving your paper time to improve through discussion with colleagues, presenting the ideas at conferences and on blogs may lead to a better final product.
Prof. Edwin van Teijlingen
Centre for Midwifery, Maternal & Perinatal Health
School of Health & Social Care

References
Hundley, V., van Teijlingen E. (2002) How to decide where to send an article for publication? Nursing Standard 16(36): 21.
van Teijlingen (1994) A social or medical comparison of childbirth? : comparing the arguments in Grampian (Scotland) and the Netherlands (PhD thesis), Aberdeen: University of Aberdeen. Available online in the British Library (search for: uk.bl.ethos.387237 ).
Teijlingen van, E. (2004) Why I can’t get any academic writing done, Medical Sociology News 30 (3): 62-6.
van Teijlingen, E. (2005) A Critical Analysis of the Medical Model as used in the Study of Pregnancy and Childbirth, Sociological Research Online 10(2) Freely available online at: www.socresonline.org.uk/10/2/teijlingen.html.
Pitchforth, E., Porter, M., Teijlingen van, E.R., Forrest Keenan, K. (2005) Writing up and presenting qualitative research in family planning and reproductive health care, Journal of Family Planning & Reproductive Health Care 31 (2): 132-135.
Teijlingen van, E., Simkhada. P.P., Simkhada, B., Ireland, J. (2012) The long and winding road to publication, Nepal Journal Epidemiology 2(4): 213-215. http://nepjol.info/index.php/NJE/article/view/7093
Simkhada, P., van Teijlingen, E., Hundley, V. (2013) Writing an academic paper for publication, Health Renaissance 11 (1): 1-5. www.healthrenaissance.org.np/uploads/Pp_1_5_Guest_Editorial.pdf

Santander Mobility Awards

I am delighted to announce that Santander have very generously provided the Graduate School, as part of the fusion fund, a further five £5k scholarships for postgraduate research students (PGRs).

These awards are intended to support PGRs to undertake study, research and/or network activities at a Partner Institution from within the UK Santander Universities Network and/or one of the Overseas Santander Partner Universities.  Awards made will cover only direct costs (travel; subsistence; training or development costs) and all applications will need to include a precise breakdown of costs

To be eligible to apply, applicants must be registered at BU on a postgraduate research degree irrespective of mode of study (full-time / part-time) or funding status (BU studentships / externally funded / self-funded) and must be a national from one of the countries listed within the Santander Scheme.  Please see the Policy document for further details.

Successful applicants will be expected to participate in general PR activities about their research and provide a short report based on the research activity. This may involve attending events and promoting the benefits of the funding. 

For further information, please read the GS Santander Travel Grants – Policy

To apply, please complete the GS Santander Application Form and submit it by email to gsfunding@bournemouth.ac.uk by 5 pm, Monday 1st July  2013.

 

 

CEMP Research & Innovation Cluster: New Bulletin & Agenda

The updated CEMP R&I funding bulletin & cluster meeting agenda is here: CEMP Cluster bulletin and agenda 24.5.13

The meeting is on Friday 24th May from 1-3 in the CEMP office with the following two elements:

‘Thinktank’ discussion of reading 1 – 1.40          

Funding review and monitoring 1.40 – 3

All are welcome to attend either or both. If you see a funding opportunity in the bulletin that appeals for a collaboration with CEMP, but cannot attend the meeting, please email Julian McDougall.

The reading for the ‘Think-tank’ is provided this time by Pete Fraser.  It is ‘Making sense of young people, education and digital technology: the role of sociological theory‘ by Neil Selwyn and it’s here:  Neil Selwyn Making Sense

 

 

eBU: Online Journal

Following on from my last post ‘Developing a Working Paper at BU’ in January of this year, we are now within sight of having an exciting new online journal at BU. eBU will provide both an internal and external forum for the development of research papers by undergraduate to Professor around the eight BU research themes:

 

–          Creative & Digital Economies

–          Culture & Society

–          Entrepreneurship & Economic Growth

–          Environmental Change & Biodiversity

–          Green Economy & Sustainability  

–          Health, Wellbeing & Ageing 

–          Leisure & Recreation

–          Technology & Design

Submissions will be open to immediate publication (in a safe internal environment) and open peer review by 2 appropriate BU academics. Authors will be encouraged to act upon these reviews by either reworking papers for submission to an external journal or by opting for publication on the external eBU site.

For BU academics this is a great opportunity to get critical appraisal on your research papers or ideas from colleagues. For academics it also an opportunity to encourage the submission of high quality student output, and possibly to facilitate the co-creation and co-production of publishable material to an external journal or to publish externally with eBU. For students, this is a fantastic opportunity to turn high quality essays or dissertations into scholarly outputs, which will be attractive to employers across many sectors and industries.

It is anticipated that author guidelines will be circulated in the coming weeks, and staff and students alike should begin to think about how they could submit to eBU.

If you have any questions or would like to become involved in this exciting venture, please get in touch with me via email aharding@bournemouth.ac.uk or by telephone 01202 963025

School of Health and Social Care – PhD / Open Research Seminar Wednesday 22nd May 2013 @ 1pm in R301, Royal London House

Nepali boy drinking milk tea.You are cordially invited to the lunch time seminar below which is one of a regular series of HSC PhD seminars which are open to all. Please feel free to bring your lunch.

A comparative study on nutritional problems in pre-school aged children of Kaski, Nepal – Jib Acharya

Background
Nepal remains one of the poorest countries in the world and malnutrition is a one of most pressing serious health problems especially among rural children. Malnutrition during childhood can also affect future growth and an increased risk of morbidity and mortality in later years of life. About half of all child deaths are associated with malnutrition, of which three quarters are linked to mild and moderate forms. Since Nepal has geographical variation, socio-economic inequalities and cultural beliefs which significantly affect food practices in different areas of the country. In order to overcome this situation pragmatic approaches are required.

Methods
A cross sectional study using mixed methods, was conducted among preschool children, aged 3-5 years old, from urban and rural areas of the Kaski district of Nepal. There were interviews with semi-structured questionnaires and focus group discussions on various aspects of knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, food recommendations and its barriers.  This seminar reports on 524 mothers from rural and urban areas who completed a questionnaire.

Results
A total of 61.6% mothers from urban and 38.4% from rural area, participated in the questionnaire study. The study shows nearly 37% children are not provided with nutritious food (meat, fish & eggs) regularly. Similarly, nearly 5% of families cannot afford meat, 7.1% juice and 7% fruit. Nearly 17% of mothers cannot choose nutritious food from grocery stores. Likewise, 4.3% of children like fish, meat & eggs, 33.2% noodles, 35.1% biscuits & chocolates and 22.9% rice, pulses & vegetables.

Conclusion
The knowledge and attitudes towards nutritious food of rural and urban mothers are still poor in both societies. However, a belief about food practice is still strongly embedded in rural mothers compared to those in urban areas. Urban mothers are significantly better in food recommendation compared to rural mothers who face huge barriers.

Biography
Jib is at the transfer stage of his PhD

There is no need to book but general enquiries should be directed to Sara Glithro

Action Research Masterclass

The course
Date:
4-5 July 2013
Location:
R207, Royal London House, Bournemouth University, Christchurch Road, Bournemouth, BH1 3LT. View on map>>

This 2 day masterclass will discuss the range of approaches for action research, focusing primarily on action  research. Topic covered include:

  • Action research as n approach, the history, spectrum, cycles and phases of action research
  • Designing an action research project collaboratively
  • Working together to generate data and decide on further data collection
  • Issues involved in analysing data and feeding back results
  • Making collaborative decisions on action/s to take
  • Evaluating actions, disseminating results and starting again
  • Action research as a transformative approach

The Masterclass facilitated by Dr Angela Cotter, a visiting lecturer at Regents University, London (School of Psychotherapy and Counselling Psychology). She is in private practice as a Jungian analytical psychotherapist, and undertakes organisational consultancy related to residential care of marginalised groups, alongside working as academic and clinical supervisor, researcher and teacher.

Booking information
The fee of £200 (£125 for postgraduate students with further reductions for BU staff and students) includes the full two days, with the course facilitators, all refreshments and course materials. Places are limited and allocated on a first come, first served basis.

Please book online by midday on 28 June 2013.

Find out more and book your place >>
Or contact Jo Temple on 01202 962011 or jtemple@bournemouth.ac.uk

PGR Development Workshop – Public Engagement

Following on from the successful PGR conference, if any Postgraduate Researcher would like to attend an introductory session on Public Engagement, there is a workshop organised for Wednesday 8th May 2013 at 2 pm in PG22. During this workshop you will look at what Public Engagement is; Why does it matter; How to do it: Engagement in practice and what support is available for creating public engagement events.  The workshop will be led by Dr Rebecca Edwards.

If you would like to reserve a place, please email gsbookings@bournemouth.ac.uk.

BPS Wessex Student Conference

On Saturday, Bournemouth University hosted the Wessex Branch of the British Psychological Society (BPS) Annual Student Conference. This event provided an opportunity for students to showcase novel research and, in addition to BU, attracted Psychology students from a range of institutions (e.g. Universities of Surrey, Sussex, Winchester, and Southampton). The breadth of institution was matched by the breadth of student; with undergraduate research assistants through to doctoral students presenting their work to an audience of approximately 100 delegates.

In total, there were 28 oral presentations and 19 research posters. In addition, we were fortunate to have two thought-provoking keynote speakers. First, Dr. Richard Stephens (Keele University) spoke about the role of swearing on pain tolerance (in short, it helps, particularly if you are normally an infrequent user of coarse vocabulary) and, second, Prof. Clare Wood (Coventry University) delivered a presentation on the effects of text messaging on literacy (in sum, ‘textisms’ are not rotting the brains of our nation’s youth).

The conference sought to emphasise that, rather than a perfunctory assessment exercise, student research is an important part of knowledge creation within our universities. Whilst this was highlighted by the collaborative (student-academic) nature of the projects, it was also evident how the presenters had developed into independent researchers. This apprenticeship model is one employed by the Bournemouth Psychology Research Centre and it was pleasing to see a number of our Year 2 Psychology students presenting data that had arisen from their research assistant placements. There was a large contingent of first and second year BU Psychology students in the audience and helping with conference organisation as volunteers. We hope that they have been inspired to participate in more staff projects and will return next year to present their research.

PGR Development Workshops for May & June 2013

The following workshops are available during May and June 2013:

Finding information and Using Researcher Tools (Repeat workshop)
Outline: The session will include an introduction to advanced searching skills, using citations smartly and analytical tools
Date: Wednesday 1 May 2013
Time: 1.30 pm – 2.45 pm
Room: S102 – Studland House – Lansdowne Campus
Facilitator: Emma Crowley
Booking: gsbookings@bournemouth.ac.uk

Managing your citations using Endnote and Endnote Web (Repeat workshop)
Outline: The session will include an introduction to Endnote and Endnote Web, exporting from databases, Cite While You Write tool
Date: Wednesday 1 May 2013
Time: 3 pm – 5 pm
Room: S102 – Studland House – Lansdowne Campus
Facilitator: Emma Crowley
Booking: gsbookings@bournemouth.ac.uk

The Transfer Process
Outline: The aim of the workshop is to prepare students for the process of the transfer from MPhil/PhD to PhD. All students who register for a research degree have the choice to proceed in their studies towards an MPhil award or to transfer onto a doctoral route that leads to a PhD.
Date: Wednesday 8 May 2013
Time: 10 am – 12 pm
Room: EB708 – Executive Business Centre – Lansdowne Campus
Facilitator: Professor Anthea Innes
Booking: gsbookings@bournemouth.ac.uk

Public Engagement (REPEAT workshop)
Outline: The workshop will look at What Public Engagement is; Why does it matter?; How to do it; Engagement in practice; Internal support for creating a supportive environment for engagement.
Date: Wednesday 8 May 2012
Time: 2 pm – 4 pm
Room: PG22, Poole House – Talbot Campus
Facilitator: Dr Rebecca Edwards
Booking: gsbookings@bournemouth.ac.uk

Nvivo Training (Introduction Session)
Outline: This training will provide a comprehensive overview of Nvivo Software and will look at building your database and coding your data
Date: Monday 10th June 2013
Time: 9 am – 4.30 pm
Room: S102 – Studland House – Lansdowne Campus
Facilitator: Ben Meehan – External Consultant from QDATRAINING PLC
Booking: gsbookings@bournemouth.ac.uk

Academic Writing LIMITED PLACES AVAILABLE
Outline: This workshop covers essential good practice in writing, editing techniques and methods of improving organisation.
Date: Wednesday 12 June 2013
Time: 9.30 am – 5 pm
Room: S219 – Studland House – Lansdowne Campus
Booking
: gsbookings@bournemouth.ac.uk

Preparing for your First Review
Outline: The aim of the workshop is to familiarise students with the purpose and role of their first review
Date: Wednesday 26 June 2013
Time: 9.30 am – 11 am
Room: PG16LT (Poole House)
Facilitators: Dr Fiona Knight
Booking: gsbookings@bournemouth.ac.uk

School of Health and Social Care – PhD / Open Research Seminar on Wednesday 24 April 2013 in R201, Royal London House at 1-1.50 pm,

You are cordially invited to the lunch time seminar below which is one of a regular series of HSC PhD seminars which are open to all.  Please feel free to bring your lunch.

‘The voice of people living with Mycobacterium Ulcerans(Buruli ulcer) in the Amansie West district of Ghana’
Alex Effah

Abstract

Mycobacterium ulcerans (locally known as Buruli ulcer) is a rare dermatological (skin) disease which affects mainly children under 15 years of age in many developing countries. Due to lack of knowledge of the disease many sufferers seek medical intervention at a time when the disease has progressed leading to extensive ulcers which are difficult to treat. As a consequence many sufferers end up with severe lesions which have led to the destruction of major organs such as limb amputations, loss of genitals, varied forms of bodily disfigurements and prominent scars as well as other contracture deformities which affect their activities of daily living.

To-date the biomedical approach to understanding Buruli ulcer dominates the literature. It must be borne in mind that beyond morbidity and mortality Buruli ulcer inflicts enormous physical, social and psychological costs not only on the individual sufferer but his/her family and the community, yet there is lack of a rigorous qualitative study to understand the illness experience of people living with this devastating skin disease. This study therefore used the grounded theory approach to understand the illness experience of people living with Buruli ulcer in the endemic district of Amansie West. The constant comparative method of analysis led to the core category of Re-living the trauma of my ulcer. The grounded theory has uncovered the reasons why people with Buruli ulcer report late for medical treatment, the effects of the illness on their quality of life and well-being as well as their perceived support needs.  Recommendations and areas for further research into the lives of people living with Buruli ulcer are explored.

Alex Effah is at the write-up stage of his PhD.

PhD student from BU presented his research to the MPs at the House of Commons, London

Mr Mayank Anand, a research     student in BU’s School of Design, Engineering & Computing, recently attended the SET for Britain at the House of Commons in London. SET for Britain is an annual national research conference which is organized by The Parliamentary and Scientific Committee and aims at promoting early-stage and early-career research  scientists, engineers and technologists of Britain.

Mayank presented his research on Lubricant condition monitoring for the in-service lifeboats of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) which is supervised by Prof Mark Hadfield and Dr Ben Thomas from BU, Mr Steve Austen (Head of Engineering) from RNLI and in-kind supported by BP Technology Ltd. The project has also been kindly supported by the members of Sustainable Design Research Centre. Mayank’s abstract was chosen out of hundreds of leading research applications from around the UK to appear amongst the 60 finalists at the conference and drew a great deal of interest from MPs and other participants.

The MPs for the constituency of Bournemouth, Mr Tobias Ellwood (East Bournemouth) and Mr Conor Burns (Bournemouth West) kindly attended the conference to speak to Mayank about his research.

On presenting his engineering research to the MPs, Mayank said, “it was a unique experience speaking to the MPs about my project and to see their enthusiasm for research. They asked valuable questions and there was a great deal of discussion about the different aspects of the project. It also gave me an opportunity to learn that how an individual research at the university level can contribute to the overall research outputs of UK and helps the government while making research based decisions”. Mayank added “My work also received attention from the industry people in terms of how the approach I adopted in my research can be applied to other engineering applications. This was a real boost to my confidence as not only my work was appreciated but also considered to be useful extensively. Networking with the other researchers from universities across the UK was an added bonus to get to know about their research and share ideas in common research interests”.

How not to write a PhD Thesis

In the following THE article, Professor of Media Studies at University of Brighton,Tara Brabazon, gives her top ten tips for doctoral failure:

“My teaching break between Christmas and the university’s snowy reopening in January followed in the footsteps of Goldilocks and the three bears. I examined three PhDs: one was too big; one was too small; one was just right. Put another way, one was as close to a fail as I have ever examined; one passed but required rewriting to strengthen the argument; and the last reminded me why it is such a pleasure to be an academic.

Concurrently, I have been shepherding three of my PhD students through the final two months to submission. These concluding weeks are an emotional cocktail of exhaustion, frustration, fright and exhilaration. Supervisors correct errors we thought had been removed a year ago. The paragraph that seemed good enough in the first draft now seems to drag down a chapter. My postgraduates cannot understand why I am so picky. They want to submit and move on with the rest of their lives……” Read the full Article.

HSC PhD student Colleen Deane has recently been very successful in winning an internal grant of £1000 on behalf of Santander to support her PhD research activities. These funds will support accommodation costs allowing Colleen to collaborate with the University of Nottingham on her PhD topic which will be investigating mechanisms regulating muscle mass decline in the elderly. Colleen will be working with world leading researchers in the field of human molecular and metabolic physiology based at the recently awarded MRC/ARUK Centre for Musculoskeletal Ageing. Colleen will also have the opportunity to learn state-of-the-art data analysis techniques which will be sure to equip her for a very successful research career. In addition to developing collaborative links and learning techniques, the results will contribute towards Colleen’s thesis, future publications and conference presentations. Thus the personal and academic outputs are extremely promising with potentially high ramifications for the prevention of age-related muscle loss. For any further information regarding Colleen’s research, please contact her: cdeane@bournemouth.ac.uk