Category / Training

EU Stakeholder Partnership Event – Innovating Cities with Nature and Culture

The European Commission is organising a Stakeholder Partnership event on 20 October 2015 to facilitate networking, information exchange and cross-border partnerships of actors interested in addressing urban challenges through innoeuropevating with nature or by making innovative use of cultural heritage assets for regenerating cities. More information is available from the website.

In the autumn, under the Horizon 2020 work programme for 2016-17, the European Commission will launch new calls for large-scale demonstration projects in cities as living-labs for nature-based solutions to societal challenges and cultural heritage as a driver for sustainable development. These calls mark a shift from basic and applied research to a novel type of innovation actions based on a systemic approach to solve problems and promote a more resource efficient, greener and competitive economy. The calls will aim at engaging stakeholders in cross-sectoral partnerships and inter-disciplinary activities, which are deemed necessary for co-designing, co-developing and co-implementing innovative solutions, testing them in real-world conditions through demonstration activities and securing their market uptake.

The Stakeholder Partnership Event aims at presenting the strategic orientations and rationale behind the new approach for research and innovation in cities using nature and cultural heritage, and at offering an opportunity for information exchange and networking.

Representatives of public authorities and other stakeholders from cities and regions, industry and businesses, civil society organisations and from the research community are invited to join the event on Tuesday, 20 October 2015, at DG Research and Innovation, Rue du Champs de Mars 21, 1049, Brussels. Around 200 participants are expected.

Register now!

 

UKRO Information Event – Innovative Training Networks 7/10/15

ukro_logo-150x85Information Event: Horizon 2020 Innovative Training Networks (ITN) – Royal Veterinary College, London​​, Wednesday 7 October 2015

​​The current EU funding programme for research and innovation, Horizon 2020, offers exciting opportunities for academia and industry collaboration through European and international partnerships. These include schemes which are completely ‘bottom-up’, in that organisations can initiate projects on topics of their own choice.

The UK Research Office (UKRO), in its capacity as UK National Contact Point for the Horizon 2020 Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions (MSCA), is holding two information events on the 2016 ‘Innovative Training Networks’ (ITN) call for proposal, which will have a deadline in mid-January 2016.

Aim of the Marie Skłodowska-Curie Innovative Training Networks

The ITN scheme supports joint research training and/or doctoral programmes, implemented by European partnerships of universities, research institutions, industry (incl. SMEs) and other non-academic organisations. The research training programmes are intended to provide doctoral students with excellent research skills, coupled with experience outside academia, hence developing their innovation capacities and employability prospects. ​

Aim of the events

The events aim to provide participants with an in-depth overview of the ITN scheme. Participants should gain a clear understanding of the proposal format for each scheme and the key issues relating to planning, writing and submitting proposals.

Event Registration is via the UKRO website.

Attendance for the event is free of charge, but registration is mandatory.

Places will be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. Further information on the venue will be provided to delegates once they have registered.

BU subscribes to the UK Research Office (UKRO). Please sign up to get updates direct to your inbox. You will also need to register to view the draft programme for this event.

FREE – Places for BU Staff and PhD Students for Creative Approaches in Dementia Masterclass

BUDI have a few free places available for BU staff and PhD Students to attend its masterclass entitled “Creative Approaches in Dementia” being held on Wednesday 30 September. This masterclass will be an interactive session which will be exploring the power and potential of creativity in supporting good practice and positive experiences of living with dementia.

Our speakers are:

Derek Eland, artist; Jonny Fluffypunk, poet; Andrew Baker, musician and Sharon Muiruri, drama specialist.

To read the flyer please click here . To book your free place please contact Dr Samuel Nyman at snyman@bournemouth.ac.uk

Updating your Staff Profile Pages? Here’s a handy tip!

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For starters, to change information on your Staff Profile Pages, you will need to log onto your BRIAN account to do so.

Any information added or amended on your BRIAN account usually requires an overnight automated refresh for it to appear on your Staff Profile Pages the next day.

Here’s the tip – if you want to see the changes made straight away, there is a button on your Staff Profile Page which you can click to prompt the refresh to take place instantaneously.

Scroll to the bottom of your Staff Profile Page and you will see this in the left hand corner –

refreshIt’s very discreet but it’s there.

Click on the ‘Refresh now’ button and it will refresh your page and you can see the changes made instantly.

 

 

*Please note that any information entered in the ‘Overview’ section under the Profile tab will not appear on your Staff Profile Pages. If you wish to update your background information, there are fields under ‘My Professional Activities’ which will allow you to do so.

Please see below a series of ‘How to update your Staff Profile Pages with BRIAN’ training sessions available during the following dates:

2pm to 3.30pm, 20 August – C203 Christchurch House, Talbot

2pm to 3.30pm, 15 September – S102 Studland House, Lansdowne

1.30pm to 3pm, 28 October – C124, Christchurch House, Talbot

2pm to 3.30pm, 9 November – TBC

2pm to 3.30pm, 15 December – C203, Christchurch House, Talbot

Please get in touch with OD@bournemouth.ac.uk to book a place.

 

Understanding Open Access workshop

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Following the Finch Report, the Open Access movement has gained significant momentum in the UK. Most major funders now have open access policies and mandates. HEFCE’s post-REF2014 policy states – ‘To be eligible for submission in the post-REF2014, journal articles and conference proceedings (with ISSN) accepted for publication after 1 April 2016 must be made open access.

RKEO currently provides a series of Open Access and BRIAN development workshop to help academics understand Open Access and what needs to be done to comply. In this ‘Understanding Open Access’ workshop, you will:
– Gain a background and understanding of Open Access
– Understand what it means for Bournemouth University
– Know how to comply with the Open Access Policies (via BRIAN)

The next workshop will take place on 4th August, from 10am to 11am, at EB202, Lansdowne.

To book a place, please send an email to Organisational Development.

For queries about the workshop, please direct them to Pengpeng Hatch at RKEO.

What you need to know if you are updating your Staff Profile Pages

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In order to update your Staff Profile Pages, you will need to update information on your BRIAN account.

By keeping up-to-date information of your publications including journal articles, books, book chapters, conference papers, reports, etc also means that all publication information on your external facing Staff Profile Pages are kept up to date.

The same applies to other types of information including grant and award information, professional activities which include your qualifications, teaching profile, public engagement and outreach activities, memberships, external responsibilities, and many more.

One thing worth noting – The “Overview” page under the ‘Profile’ tab on BRIAN is the latest feature introduced in the latest BRIAN upgrade. All information populated on this “Overview” page WILL NOT be extracted across to your Staff Profile Pages to avoid duplication with similar type information under ‘My Professional Activities’. If you wish to update your academic profile, you will find all relevant items under ‘My Professional Activities’

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If you have further queries, please email them to BRIAN@bournemouth.ac.uk.

*BRIAN training sessions are currently taking place once a month so do look out for future training dates for further training!

 

Realist methodologies – it’s a case of C+M=O don’t you know

1401Having led some seminars at BU, and dipped my toe in to teaching, as a useful mechanism and resource, I have often wondered what contexts make for a good workshop. It would be my suggestion that some or all of; insightful means of relating content; inspiring delivery; a variety of taught and practical exercises; and an opportunity to network and socialise are needed for an enjoyable workshop experience. These are the contexts which I hypothesize to be conducive toward a good workshop outcome. My experiences of workshops in my early career researcher and PhD journey to date have been mostly positive, but I have never experienced all of the above in equal high measure – UNTIL NOW!

This week I have attended a 3 day workshop on Realist Methodologies. The workshop was hosted by the University of Liverpool, but delivered on their London campus in the heart of the city’s financial district.

The content and resources was communicated and contextualised by facilitators Justin Jagosh (University of Liverpool), Geoff Wong (University of Oxford) and Sonia Dalkin (Northumbria University) in a manner that was informative, insightful and engaging. There was a good mix of taught material and hands on exercises. However, there were also chances to present and constructively discuss your work to the wider and interdisciplinary group, and opportunities for one on ones with the facilitators to discuss and (de)construct your own realist projects. In addition, there was also an opportunity to chat in an informal setting over some pizza, pasta, beer and gin & tonics! All of this led to enhanced reasoning, a mechanism, with an outcome of increased understanding.

So in a way that is succinct and accessible, what is realist methodology and what how can it be applied in research? I’ve actually dropped in some hints in the two larger paragraphs above… Before the methodology is outlined, firstly it is useful to discuss the philosophical position on which realist methodologies are based.

Critical Realism

Realist methodology and evaluation is underpinned by the critical realist philosophical works of the likes of Roy Bhaskar and Andrew Sayer (to name a few). This furthers a philosophical position that “…there exists both an external world independent of human consciousness, and at the same time a dimension which includes our socially determined knowledge about reality.” (Danermark et al., 2002: 5-6). On this basis, it is possible to be a positivist and objective ontologist (what is) whilst, at the same time, being an epistemological interpretivist (what it is to know).

Going deeper (stay with me!), Roy Bhaskar proposed three realms of reality. The actual, (objective entities that manifest in the real world), real (Subjective structures, phenomena and agency that act as causal mechanisms in the real world) and the empirical (Observable human consciousness and perspectives on the actual and real). As Easton states, “The most fundamental aim of critical realism is explanation; answers to the question “what caused those events to happen?”” (2010: 121).

Realist Evaluation

Based on this, and in the context of evaluating social programmes, realist evaluation is a research approach that seeks to ‘scratch beneath the surface’ and offer a ‘real’ and plausible account of “…what works for whom, in what circumstances, in what respects and how.” (Pawson et al., 2005: 21). It does so by proposing that the outcome (O) of social programmes or interventions rest the conceptual relationship between mechanisms (M) and context (C) – expressed as the ‘O=M+C’ formula.

However, integral to mechanisms are both resources (typically the programme or intervention) and reasoning. With it sometimes hard to adequately illustrate and distinguish these two characteristics in the CMO configuration, Dalkin et al (2015) propose a new iteration of Pawson and Tilley’s (1997) original CMO formula – expressed as ‘M(Resources) + C→M(Reasoning) = O’. I’m afraid you’ll have to come and ask me in person for my CMO configuration!

In conjunction with findings and evidence from existing literature to inform research protocols, this conceptual formula is used to gather data, and interrogate to ‘scratch beneath the surface’ as to what happens in social programmes and interventions, why, for whom and in what context. Finally, and importantly to note, realist evaluation has no methodological prescriptions – although it is particularly suited to mixed methods and qualitative research methods.

The realist methodology community is a very friendly and collegiate one. Do get in touch to discuss this approach. If I can’t help you (for example, I haven’t discussed realist synthesis – a kind of systematic review approach using the realist philosophy and CMO configuration), I can pass you on to someone who might be able to (The RAMASES JISCMail list is a good start).

My next workshop has a lot to live up to!

 

 

References

Dalkin, S. M., Greenhalgh, J., Jones, D., Cunningham, B. & Lhussier, M. 2015. What’s in a mechanism? Development of a key concept in realist evaluation. Implementation Science, 10.

Danermark, B., Ekstrom, M., Jakobsen, L. & Karlsson, J. C. 2002. Explaining Society: Critical realism in the social sciences, London, Routledge.

Easton, G. 2010. Critical realism in case study research. Industrial Marketing Management, 39, 118–128.

Pawson, R., Greenhalgh, T., Harvey, G. & Walshe, K. 2005. Realist review – a new method of systematic review designed for complex policy interventions. Journal of Health Services Research & Policy, 10, 21-34.

Pawson, R. & Tilley, N. 1997. Realistic Evaluation, London, Sage.

Funder Information events

If you are forward-thinking, attending a funder information event or conference can give you the edge when it comes to applying.

Looking at Horizon 2020 as an example, the following events are a sample taking place over the coming months:

Events are added regularly to the Horizon 2020 pages.

If you attend an external funder event of this type, please remember to let your RKEO Facilitator or Officer know. It may be that we can help share information that you obtain with others at BU with similar interests or alert you to others who might be potential partners.

Marie Skłodowska-Curie Individual Fellowships – Important news for applications for 2015

Logo_Marie-CurieIf you are hoping to apply, then you MUST send us your Intention to Bid for this call by 13 July 2015 with one form per Fellow.

[Form now removed as deadline has passed]

It is essential that you do this so that RKEO can plan for the resources that will be required to support each application.

If you need to find out more about this call before submitting your Intention to Bid, please go to the dedicated website

 

 

Career Management Training for Researchers

How well do you understand your skills, values and motivations?

The Vitae website has a wealth of personal development resources and advice designed specifically for researchers, including self-assessment tools that allow you to explore your motivations and identify career path options. Visit the VITAE website and register using your BU Login.

Please note that BU BRAD training courses are running this week; there are still places available on most courses including a career trajectory seminar.

Newton Fund seeks Peer Review Panel Members

newton fundThe Newton Fund is actively inviting expressions of interest from senior and early career researchers to expand their pool of panel members for the Newton Fund initiative and, potentially, other British Council programmes.

Looking at the specialisms below, BU has significant expertise in many of these areas.

They are looking for early career researchers who would like to broaden their experience of peer review as a career development opportunity, and for senior researchers who are willing to share and use their experience to support the review panels. Please note that we can only consider researchers based at UK institutions.

By getting involved in funding panels, you will gain invaluable insights into how a funder functions, how they assess applications, build your network, raise your profile in your field and, potentially, give you the opportunity to influence future funding decisions.

For this particular invitation:

Eligibility  Senior and early-career researchers. Early-career researcher is defined as being aCollaborative Decision Making PhD holder + up to 10 years. For fields where a PhD is not a usual career requirement, sufficient research experience will be accepted.

Researchers with the following specialisms are eligible to apply:

  • Biological and Medical Sciences
  • Environment and Agriculture
  • Arts and Humanities
  • Social Sciences
  • Engineering and Physical Sciences

In particular, the Newton Fund would like to hear from researchers who have the following subject specialisms:

  • Human rights
  • Forensic anthropology
  • Marine biology/Oceanography
  • Aquaculture
  • Public health/Nutrition
  • Food science
  • Microbiology
  • Earth Sciences

Find out more and apply!