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Postgraduate Research Live Exhibition – Deadline to Apply Approaching

Calling all PGRs! Only 1 week left to apply. Exhibit your research or research journey at this PGR Live Exhibition on Wednesday 5 December, followed by a free festive social for PGRs and Supervisors. Please contact Natalie Stewart if you have any questions.

This is your opportunity to display your research to all of BU in creative and innovative ways during this open exhibition.

Follow the link for full details on how to submit, joint submissions are accepted.

https://www1.bournemouth.ac.uk/…/conferences-exhibitions-sh…

HE Policy Update for the w/e 19th October 2018

Policy impact – some steps you can take and why it’s a good idea (despite appearances)

We wrote a blog on this topic  – you can read it here.

Choosing a university

The Ofs have published a survey that shows the role of parents and friends in applicant decision making.  There’s a big research paper by CFE Research.  

The OfS respond to the survey:

  • There are a huge number of different things that you could consider when thinking about higher education. And as CFE emphasised, ‘there are limits to the amount of information processing that people can undertake’. Often when we’re faced with more information than we feel we can process, we just switch off because it is overwhelming. The solution is not to throw more and more information out there, but to support and empower people to find the information that is important to them and to make sense of it.
  • We’ve started work shaping and defining what our approach to improving information, advice and guidance will look like. It is vital that our approach in this area draws on the best and most reliable evidence. Most importantly, this will mean adopting an approach informed by an understanding of how people make decisions in the real world, supported by the latest thinking and technology. It will be rooted in behavioural psychology approaches, and driven by research and collaboration directly with students and those who advise them.
  • We are taking the first steps in developing a new resource to better support decision making about higher education. This new resource would help students navigate and understand available information and data, and would be integrated with other key sources of information. It would use personalisation to ensure that students can quickly identify and find the information that is most important for them. This would be combined with carefully designed data visualisations that would make engagement with key datasets easier.
  • Our aim is to create a resource that can support a seamless journey through available information and which responds to individual needs. This is an ambitious project, but our research shows that it is needed. The next steps will be to build on the research we have already carried out with prospective students, parents and teachers, and develop prototypes to test with them. If the outcomes of this testing give us a clear way forward, we will begin building the new resource in the spring.

Sector issues: Graduate Outcomes

Prospects have published a series of reports on graduate outcomes since September.

What do graduates do? draws on DLHE data to take a first look at the outcomes of first degree completers in the six months after completing their studies. It breaks the degrees down into sensible programme groups and dissects the outcomes for each. It looks at the 2016/17 year noting the political volatility surrounding early Brexit and the snap general election. There is a good introduction section which gives an overview:  The graduate labour market remains robust and by some measures is as strong as it has been for some time. Some details on the destination of first-degree graduates:

Page 14 talks of the valuing of work placements and page 15 has an interesting discourse on social mobility and the influence of careers provision, including how universities may need to brand their careers provision differently to attract those from lower social economic groups who had a disappointing or negative prior experience of careers support.

Wonkhe summarise the report:
[It] finds the graduate unemployment rate to be 5.1%, the lowest in 39 years.
Starting salaries for graduates rose 2.9% over the last year, from £21,776 to £22,399.
Plus there are 7,895 more graduates in professional roles. Skills shortages appear to have helped job prospects, especially in fields such as IT, engineering, accountancy and marketing.

However, there were small but increasing numbers of graduates on zero-hours contracts – 4% of those employed, up from 3.6% last year. Retail employs the highest number of graduates in non-graduate roles. While 12.8% of graduates went to work in retail, around two-thirds of them were in jobs below a professional level.

Wonkhe also have a guest blog on the report written by Charlie Ball, Prospects’ Head of HE Intelligence.

Resilience

Prospects also published Graduate resilience in the labour market (in conjunction with Lancaster University) which explores graduate ‘resilience’, specifically looking at how students transition after graduating. It explains that developing a graduate’s commercial awareness and improving their connection with employers could ensure they are prepared to make the transition from university into the workplace, and meet the demands of employers. And that: recommendations are made to improve marketing strategy, student engagement and developing graduate confidence.

The key findings in this report are:

  • 57% of respondents stated that confidence issues affected their transition after graduating.
  • 45% were concerned over a lack of relevant experience.
  • 43% of respondents felt they lacked soft skills.
  • There was a difference between genders, with women more likely to report they lack of relevant experience and soft skills.
  • There is a disparity between faculties regarding their graduates’ resilience.
  • There is little connection between having a 2.2 degree and unemployment/underemployment.
  • Graduates with a 2.1 classification were most likely to be unemployed in this study.
  • Of the seven students who identified as having a disability, 86% reported issues with confidence, 43% felt they lacked relevant experience and 71% felt they lacked softer skills.

Teaching Employability

What’s the best way to teach employability? draws on a study at Essex University to consider whether generic or bespoke discipline specific employability modules are most effective. The study found negative results and concluded there were no significant advantages in contextualising employability teaching as opposed to a standard generic approach:

  • No improvement in student engagement, performance, satisfaction or inclination to take work experience was evident following the completion of a degree-specific credit bearing module.
  • Integrating intellectual degree content into employability modules was neither useful nor valued by students.
  • Students reported a preference for the more practical rather than intellectual aspects of the teaching.
  • Students showed no preference for a contextualised rather than pure employability module.

However, the students did like:

  • Providing graduates with labour market information relevant to their degree was met with positive response.
  • Students also valued recruitment tips and meeting professionals and employers.

Transitioning from study to work

Finally, in partnership with the University of Salford, What factors contribute to a successful graduate transition?, looks into humanities, arts and creative arts graduates to better understand what the transition from university into the workforce is really like for graduates. They state: Finishing university represents a massive change for individuals as they leave the security of their student identity. This can be a turbulent time of adjustment, but research indicates that there is steady improvement in the circumstances of graduates in the first two years after completing their degrees.

Universities can support graduate transition in many ways, for example by ensuring careers support is still available for graduates, as well as embedding a strong infrastructure that helps students understand career planning and employability before they leave.

The key findings are:

  • Movement and change is commonplace in early graduate careers: 58.9% of graduates changed their job and/or career status between 6 and 16 months after graduating.
  • Changes in career ideas after graduating is normal: at 16 months post-graduation, only 25.9% stated their career plans hadn’t changed since finishing university.
  • Many graduates are proactive when faced with initial challenges in finding fulfilling work; examples include moving into self-employment, undertaking further study, and venturing overseas.
  • The support of family and friends is vital for graduates, as well as engaging in career conversations with people they trust.
  • Location matters. Those living in small towns with fewer graduate opportunities can feel stuck if they feel there are fewer suitable opportunities.
  • Career attitudes are influenced by graduates’ social background, e.g. 91% of higher-class respondents were confident discussing their skills/strengths and 85% were confident at an interview; in comparison, just 68% of lower-class graduates agreed to both those statements.
  • Gender differences were also evident. For example, men (81%) report greater confidence at interviews than women (75%), but 83% of women said they were proactive in taking action about their career in contrast to 56% of men.
  • Graduates can sometimes blame themselves incorrectly when a hoped-for career doesn’t materialise quickly. Graduates need to be aware of wider labour market issues that may make a certain career harder to get into.
  • Graduates need support to reflect on how their degree-level skills and knowledge can transfer into areas of work unrelated to their degree subject.

There is a separate report on the transition from PhD study to employment.

National Hate Crime Awareness Week

As National Hate Crime Awareness Week begins, Yvonne Hawkins explains in a new blog post how the Office for Students is working with universities and colleges, students and others to eradicate hate crime on campus.

Student safeguarding and welfare is a priority for the Office for Students. We are shining a spotlight on key issues, support improvements in policy and practice, and identify ‘what works’ to ensure that interventions and initiatives deliver maximum impact and benefit.

Fees and funding: FE Spending

Robert Halfon MP, Chair of the Education Committee, has written to the Chancellor of the Exchequer to highlight the stark disparity between funding for pre- and post-16 education and urge the Government to ‘look very carefully’ at the core level of funding for FE ahead of the Budget and Spending Review.

In a letter to the Chancellor Halfon states that ‘it cannot be right that a funding ‘dip’ exists for students between the ages of 16 and 18, only to rise again in higher education’. He continues that ‘successive governments have failed to give further education the recognition it deserves for the role it pays in our national productivity puzzle’.

The Committee is currently conducting an inquiry into the level and distribution of school and college funding and last week heard from a panel on the current issues faced by the FE sector.

Q – Grahame Morris: To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the press Association of Colleges’ release entitled AoC update on college pay, published in July 2018, if he will he take steps to close the £7000 a year pay disparity between teachers working in further education colleges compared with their counterparts in schools.

A – Anne Milton:

  •  The further education (FE) sector – including FE colleges – has a different legal status and relationship to the government when compared with schools. FE colleges are private sector institutions, independent of the government. It is for individual FE employers to agree local pay structures with unions, based on local needs.
  • The department values all of our teachers and leaders in FE who change lives for the better. Since 2013, we have invested over £120 million in the FE workforce, including investing in workforce development through the independent Education and Training Foundation (ETF).
  • Having enough highly-skilled FE teachers in place to deliver high-quality, work-relevant skills training is essential, particularly for the successful delivery of T Levels and apprenticeships. This is why we have committed up to £20 million to help providers, teachers and leaders prepare to deliver T Levels. This includes launching Taking Teaching Further, a £5 million programme to attract industry professionals to teach in FE.
  • FE providers help to make sure people have the skills they need to get on in life, which is why we have protected base rate funding for 16 to 19 year olds until 2020. However, we acknowledge that FE faces cost pressures. This is why the department has been actively engaging with the sector to look closely at how we fund providers to ensure that the system supports sustainable, high-quality education. We will be looking carefully at these issues in the Spending Review.

Q – Grahame Morris: To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the validity of the findings of the Institute for Fiscal Studies 2018 annual report on education spending in England that funding for further education has been reduced more than other areas of education since 2010.

A – Anne Milton:

  • The Institute for Fiscal Studies report uses published data on funding and student numbers to derive a trend in real terms expenditure per student. Their report shows that funding for school pupils aged 5 to 16 will be more than 50% higher in real terms per pupil in 2020 than in 2000. The government chose to prioritise pre-16 schooling because that is absolutely fundamental to later learning and achievement.
  • We have protected the base rate of funding for 16 to 19 year olds for all types of providers until 2020. Our commitment to the 16 to 19 sector has contributed to the current record high proportion of 16 and 17 year olds who are participating in education or apprenticeships.
  • We are investing in the sector to support providers to deliver the new T level qualifications from 2020. This will mean an additional £500 million every year once they are fully rolled out. We recently announced a further £38 million for the first wave of T level providers to invest in equipment and facilities to support the roll-out of T levels.
  • We are currently considering the efficiency and resilience of the further education sector and assessing how far existing funding and regulatory structures meet the costs of delivering quality further education.

Adult learning – changes afoot

Currently progressing through Parliament are a set of Statutory Instruments which aim to transfer adult education functions of the Secretary of State for Education to Combined authorities. This applies to Liverpool, Greater Manchester, Cambridgeshire and Peterborough, Tees Valley, the West Midlands, and the West of England who all have an elected metro mayor. These statutory instruments will devolve control of the adult education budget from the Government to each combined authority from August 2019, meaning from the 2019/20 academic year, Mayors and Combined Authorities would be responsible for adult education funding, and management for learners.

This may be of interest locally when Bournemouth, Poole and Christchurch combine.

Proposed transferred functions:

  • education and training for persons aged 19 or over and others subject to adult detention
  • provision of facilities to support the learning aims of those aged 19 or over
  • payment of tuition fees
  • functions related to apprenticeship training
  • functions related to persons subject to adult detention

Joint responsibility between Secretary of State and Combined Authority for:

  • encouragement of education and training for persons aged 19 or over and others subject to adult detention
  • provision of financial resources

Access and Participation

The Government has published the final research report Implementation of Opportunity Areas: An Independent Evaluation which aim to improve social mobility. The area delivery plans can be viewed here. The nearest opportunity area to BU is West Somerset: their plan.

HEPI issued a policy note by Professor John Raferty ex-VC of London Met University who reflects on turning around a struggling institution and focuses on his social mobility mission including increasing the number of his institution’s BME students entering highly skilled graduate employment by an increase of 56%..

Parliamentary Questions

This week there was a parliamentary question on the requirement for HE provisions to work with Electoral Registration Officers to support students to register to vote and respond to requests for information. A question on comparative take up of engineering and physics careers by gender and divided between Scotland and England (the Minister didn’t compare).  Another Brexit and Horizon 2020 question (with a familiar response) and one on the Russel Group favoured European Skills Passport.

On mental health in Universities:

Q – Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will meet the Secretary of State for Education to discuss mental health in universities. [177826]

A – Matt Hancock:

  • The Department of Health and Social Care and the Department for Education continue to work closely on the needs of all young people, including university students.
  • The University Mental Health Charter announced in June 2018 is backed by the Government and led by the sector, and will drive up standards in promoting student and staff mental health and wellbeing. The Charter, which will reward institutions that deliver improved student mental health outcomes, will develop in an iterative process, shaped by co-production with students, staff and partner organisations. Prospective students and their families will be able to identify providers who

Want more?

BU has subscriptions with Wonkhe and Research Professional who send out daily news and updates on all the latest happenings. If you would like to subscribe to either (or both) to stay more current throughout the week contact policy@bournemouth.ac.uk and we’ll sign you up. Happy reading!

Consultations

Here is the link to all BU’s consultation responses. Recent submissions cover Access and Participation, the REF guidance, and Student Numbers.

Other news

Contract Cheating: The Conversation talks plagiarism and considers whether international students are more at risk.

Loneliness: The Government have published their loneliness strategy ‘a connected society’ with schools and the education sector centre stage in its aims to enable meaningful social interactions. Key points:

  • A review of best practice to identify and support young carers
  • DfE partnering with the National Apprenticeships Service to encourage employers to offer placements to young people with SEN or disabilities
  • DfE publishing guidance for schools on maximising the use of their premises for beneficial community purposes
  • Embed loneliness into the relationships education curriculum in schools
  • DfE commitment to improve mental health support for students in HE, and establish a working group with the sector to review support for students transitioning into university

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Funding opportunity : NIHR Partnerhip Fellowships

As part of the new structure of NIHR Fellowships, the NIHR Academy is partnering with seven of the UK’s leading medical charities for the first time, to offer jointly funded Partnership Fellowships, at both Doctoral and Advanced (post-doctoral) level.

  • Diabetes UK
  • Kidney Research UK
  • Moorfields Eye Charity
  • MS Society
  • Muscular Dystrophy UK
  • Pancreatic Cancer UK
  • Parkinson’s UK

This jointly funded Partnership Fellowships will:

  • Allow researchers the opportunity to maintain and build a relationship with both the NIHR and Charity Partner
  • Enable researchers to engage with and receive valuable input from patient groups, making the most of the public and patient engagement/involvement opportunities available.
  • Provide greater research exposure through a variety of media and communication channels.

Please visit this link to find out more about this funding opportunity.

Funding opportunity : OfS Challenge Competition: Industrial strategy and skills – support for local students and graduates

The OfS, through the first Challenge Competition, invites higher education providers to develop and implement projects to identify ways of supporting the transition to highly skilled employment and improving outcomes for graduates who seek employment in their home region.

Please see a summary of the awards below:

Deadline : 14 December 2018

Project start date : April 2019; completed by 31 March 2022 (three years)

Award available : Between £100,000 to £300,000 (individual); Up to £500,000 (collaborative bids with strategic partners)

Please see this link for more information about this funding opportunity.

Funding opportunity : Manufacturing the Future: Standard Research Proposals

EPSRC logo

The EPSRC Manufacturing the Future theme invites standard research proposals for consideration at a manufacturing-focused prioritisation panel. A standard Manufacturing panel will be held every quarter (subject to sufficient demand). Proposals for any panel should address key research challenges facing manufacturing in the UK today and in the future. This activity is intended to highlight the theme’s long term ambition to increase the number of investigator- led research ideas we support.

The Manufacturing the Future theme has prioritised funding to support investigator-led research ideas in manufacturing, with up to £3 million per panel available (dependent on demand and quality of proposals). Should there be insufficient demand we reserve the right for proposals to be considered at the most appropriate capability theme panel meeting.

The next batching dates are:

  • 16:00 on 11 April 2019
  • 16:00 on 23 July 2019 (To be confirmed)

The batching dates are being published to help the manufacturing community plan and submit standard proposals. They are not deadlines but used by the Manufacturing the Future Theme to assess the level of demand in each quarter.

It is strongly recommended that proposals are submitted before the batching dates to ensure there is enough time for the peer-review process to be completed. Proposals submitted after this date, or those that do not have sufficient reviews in time for the panel, will be assessed by the most appropriate capability theme panel at a later date (i.e. Engineering, ICT, Physical Sciences or Mathematics).

Please see below a summary of this funding call :

Funding available : £3 million

Deadline : Open (However, it is suggested that applications be submitted in accordance with batching dates closing deadlines)

Please see this link for more information about this funding opportunity.

 

BU PGR Aishah Selamat won IoD’s Student of the Year Award 2018

18th October 2018 was a night to remember for BU PGR Aishah Selamat as she bagged this years’ Institute of Director (IoD) Student of the Year Award across the United Kingdom. The Student of the Year Award is dedicated to recognising the student who has shown director qualities in a project they have worked on in business, employment or academic capacity.

IoD Student of the Year Award 2018 – BU PGR Aishah Selamat

Inspired by her Ph.D. research work, Aishah mooted the idea of DataDenizens.com with the aim of advancing SMEs companies in the European continent to take on a simple analytic solution. According to Judge Junior Bammeke, Joint Institute Secretary and Data Protection Officer, Institute of Directors,

Within her application and presentation, it was clear to see that Aishah had a very detailed knowledge of her target market, and opportunities for growth.

On her winning, Aishah shared,

“As the award is dedicated to my parents, I would like to extend this award to Bournemouth University, the Sci Tech Faculty and Creative Technology Department for providing me the opportunity to undergo my Ph.D research with BU. Last but not least, I would like to give my thanks and gratitude to my supervisors, Dr. Simant Prakoonwit, Dr Reza Sahandi and Dr. Wajid Khan for their endless support and guidance. BUproud! “

For more read on IoD’s award coverage:

Top leaders of 2018 revealed at IoD Director of the Year Awards

Journal of Asian Midwives

As co-editor of the Journal of Asian Midwives I receive occasional updates from the Aga Khan University (AKU) library in Pakistan on the number of downloads of articles published in the journal.   The journal is fully Open Access and does not charge a submission or processing fees!  All articles in the Journal of Asian Midwives are stored online in the AKU Institutional Repository.  The latest update with data until end of September 2018 informed us that there had been: 18,462 downloads, from 167 countries/regions, across 56 articles.  Nearly 20,000 downloads is not bad for a fairly new journal, which only published its inaugural issue online in 2014.

What is interesting is that the detailed download figures show that Bournemouth University is the highest ranking university of all the downloading organisations.  Listed as fifth on the download list, Bournemouth is behind two commercial organisations, the Pakistan library network and Bangladesh-based Icddr-B.  The latter is one of the largest NGO (Non-Governmental Organisations in the world based on staff numbers.  Of course it helps that Bournemouth academic staff and PhD students have published five scientific articles in the past four editions of the journal [1-5].

 

Prof. Edwin van Teijlingen

CMMPH (Centre for Midwifery, Maternal & Perinatal Health)

References:

  1. Ireland, J., van Teijlingen, E., Kemp, J. (2015) Twinning in Nepal: the Royal College of Midwives UK and the Midwifery Society of Nepal working in partnership, Journal of Asian Midwives 2 (1): 26-33.
  2. Mahato, P., van Teijlingen, E., Simkhada, P., Angell, C. (2016) Birthing centres in Nepal: Recent developments, obstacles and opportunities, Journal of Asian Midwives 3(1): 18-30.
  3. Baral, YR., Lyons, K., van Teijlingen, ER., Skinner, J., (2016) The uptake of skilled birth attendants’ services in rural Nepal: A qualitative study, Journal of Asian Midwives 3(3): 7-25.
  4. Sharma, S., Simkhada, P., Hundley, V., van Teijlingen, E., Stephens J, Silwal, R.C., Angell, C. (2017) Evaluation a Community Maternal Health Programme: Lessons Learnt. Journal of Asian Midwives. 4(1): 3–20.
  5. Mahato, P., van Teijlingen, E., Simkhada, P., Angell, C. (2017) Determinants of quality of care & access to Basic Emergency Obstetric & Neonatal Care facilities & midwife-led facilities in low & middle-income countries: A Systematic Review, Journal of Asian Midwives 4(2):25-51.

The fine art of healthcare: using art to think about people and practice

The first of this academic year’s inaugural lectures will take place on Tuesday 23 October in the Shelley Theatre.  Professor Sam Porter will be discussing the ways in which art can influence health practices.

For the American philosopher, John Dewey, the importance of works of art lies in the fact that they ‘are the most intimate and energetic means of aiding individuals to share in the arts of living’. They distil the meanings behind our experiences and provide us with the opportunity to consider them from a fresh perspective.The ‘arts of living’ that will be considered in this lecture are those related to health, illness and care.Through exploring artworks from many different genres, this inaugural lecture given by Professor Sam Porter, will encourage us to think about how art can help us to improve healthcare.

Professor Sam Porter is a nurse by profession and a sociologist by academic training. His research ventures into one of the most difficult and sensitive areas of human experience: caring for people who are reaching the end of their lives. In addition to his role as the Head of Department for Social Sciences and Social Work, Professor Porter is researching issues such as the use of music therapy in hospice care, how family members can best care for their dying loved ones, and how care homes can be supported to provide excellent end of life care.

Free tickets can be booked here.

Details about whole series can be found here.

Professor Dimitrios Buhalis will present latest research on Smart Tourism : Emerging Global Digital Ecosystem at the 12th UNWTO / PATA Forum on Tourism Trends and Outlook Guilin, China Conference  The future of Tourism : Road to 2030

Professor Dimitrios Buhalis is preparing for China to present latest research on Smart Tourism : Emerging Global Digital Ecosystem at the 12th UNWTO / PATA Forum on Tourism Trends and Outlook Guilin, China Conference : The future of Tourism : Road to 2030

25-27 October 2018. People’s Government of Guilin of China, the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) and the Pacific Asia Travel Association (PATA) http://asiapacific.unwto.org/event/12th-unwtopata-forum-tourism-trends-and-outlook

SAIL meet in Hunstanton

Last week saw the bi-annual meeting of the Stay Active and Independent for Longer (SAIL) Research Team. Research colleagues from Belgium, the Netherlands and France travelled to Hunstanton, Norfolk to meet with UK partners from Norfolk County Council, University of East Anglia and Bournemouth University. The project is in 4 phases: Explore, Design and Develop, Test and Evaluate. October 2018 will see the SAIL project move into the third phase: Test. The visit to Hunstanton provided an opportunity to see at first hand the challenges which face the area in terms of supporting an aging population now and in the future. The Mayor of Hunstanton hosted an evening reception in the Town Hall to welcome the SAIL Research Team and to learn more about the progress which is being made.

Prof Ann Hemingway & Prof Adele Ladkin  meeting the Mayor of Hunstanton with Charlotte Watts, a project partner from Norfolk County Council.

SAVE THE DATE – Global STEAMlab

On Wednesday 28th November, RKEO will be hosting a STEAMlab with a global theme.

What is a STEAMlab?

The STEAMLabs offer the opportunity to meet new people from all disciplines and sectors, and to spend dedicated time developing novel ideas for research projects.

For this STEAMLab, we’re seeking to come up with novel research which addresses global challenges.

We will also be inviting relevant external attendees to contribute to the day.  We welcome academics, NGO/business/government representatives who wish to contribute to having a positive impact through addressing the world’s global challenges.

So, who should attend?

STEAMLabs cover broad themes to ensure that they are open to everyone from all disciplines. So if you think you have something to contribute then come along.  If you think that they don’t include you then please have a chat with your RKEO Facilitator who can explain how your research could make a vital contribution to new ideas and approaches. In order to encourage wider partnerships, each STEAMLab will include academics from other universities, as well as representatives from industry and other sectors.

What do I need to prepare in advance? What will the STEAMLab entail?

You do not need to prepare anything in advance. During the session, you’ll be guided through a process which results in the development of research ideas. The process facilitates creativity, potentially leading to innovative and interdisciplinary research ideas. These ideas will be explored with other attendees, and further developed based on the feedback received.

What if I don’t have time to think about ideas in advance?

You don’t need to do this but it will help. Attendees will come from a range of backgrounds so we expect that there will be lively conversations resulting from these different perspectives.

What about afterwards? Do I need to go away and do loads of work?

Well… that depends! The interactive day will result in some novel research ideas. Some of these may be progressed immediately; others might need more time to develop. You may find common ground with other attendees which you choose to take forward in other ways, such as writing a paper or applying for research funding. Your Research Facilitator will be on hand to support you as you develop bids for funding.

So, is this just networking?

Definitely not! It is a facilitated session with the primary intention of developing innovative research ideas, which also enables the development of networks. It gives you the opportunity to explore research ideas which you may develop over time, together with the chance to find common ground with academics from across BU and beyond.

 

If you have any queries, please contact Rachel Clarke, RKEO Research Facilitator.

This event is part of the Research Knowledge Exchange Development Framework.

 

 

Faculty of Management at the Women of the world (WOW) Festival.

Dr Varuni Wimalasiri of  (Faculty of Management) took part in a panel discussion on ‘International Activism’  at the WOW festival in Exeter last weekend. She spoke about her projects ‘Woman’s Work’ (funded by the Big Lottery) and also ‘HANDMADE’ (PALMERA), both which are helping refugee women to reclaim their livelihoods following displacement due to war.  In the panel Varuni spoke about how we all have a role, in whatever shape or form, in speaking up and creating opportunities for those who are marginalised.  Amongst the panelists were Grace Campbell who is a co-founder the Pink Protest.

Southbank centre’s WOW – Women of the World festival  is a global network of festivals looking to create an impact and change.  It celebrates women and girls, and looks at the obstacles that stop them from achieving their potential.  This year in the centenary of women getting to vote in UK and the #MeToo campaign – WOW was particularly important. It was a fantastic event full of food for thought!

https://www.southbankcentre.co.uk/whats-on/festivals-series/women-of-the-world

Training opportunity – completing and submitting your IRAS application

Are you currently in the process of designing, setting up or planning your research study, and would like to extend your project into the NHS?

Yes? Then you may want to take advantage of this training opportunity.

Oliver Hopper (Research & Development Coordinator, Royal Bournemouth and Christchurch Hospital) and Suzy Wignall (Clinical Governance Advisor, R&KEO)  will be running a training session on how to use, and complete your own application within the IRAS system.

IRAS (Integrated Research Application System) is the system used to gain approvals from the NHS Research Ethics Committee and Health Research Authority, before rolling out your study to NHS Trusts. To support this, the session will include the background to research ethics and the approvals required for NHS research.

The session will also be interactive, and so as participants, you will have the opportunity to go through the form itself and complete the sections, with guidance on what the reviewers are expecting to see in your answers, and tips on how to best use the system.

The training will take place in Studland House – Lansdowne Campus, room 117 on Tuesday 6th November, at 13:00pm – 16:00pm.

There are 12 spaces available, so get in touch with Research Ethics if you would like to register your interest and book a place.

NERC standard grants (January 2019 deadline) – internal competition deadline – 18th October 2018

Reminder

Deadline for internal Expressions of Interest – 18th October 2018.

NERC introduced demand management measures in 2012. These were revised in 2015 to reduce the number and size of applications from research organisations for NERC’s discovery science standard grant scheme. Full details can be found in the BU policy document for NERC demand management measures at: http://intranetsp.bournemouth.ac.uk/policy/BU Policy for NERC Demand Management Measures.docx.

As at March 2015, BU has been capped at one application per standard grant round. The measures only apply to NERC standard grants (including new investigators). An application counts towards an organisation, where the organisation is applying as the grant holding organisation (of the lead or component grant). This will be the organisation of the Principal Investigator of the lead or component grant.

BU process

As a result, BU has introduced a process for determining which application will be submitted to each NERC Standard Grant round. This will take the form of an internal competition, which will include peer review. The next available standard grant round is January 2019. The deadline for internal Expressions of Interest (EoI) which will be used to determine which application will be submitted is 18th October 2018.  The EoI form, BU policy for NERC Demand Management Measures and process for selecting an application can be found here: I:\R&KEO\Public\NERC Demand Management 2019.

NERC have advised that where a research organisation submits more applications to any round than allowed under the cap, NERC will office-reject any excess applications, based purely on the time of submission through the Je-S system (last submitted = first rejected). However, as RKEO submit applications through Je-S on behalf of applicants, RKEO will not submit any applications that do not have prior agreement from the internal competition.

Following the internal competition, the Principal Investigator will have access to support from RKEO, and will work closely with the Research Facilitator and Funding Development Officers to develop the application. Access to external bid writers will also be available.

Appeals process

If an EoI is not selected to be submitted as an application, the Principal Investigator can appeal to Professor Tim McIntyre-Bhatty, Deputy Vice-Chancellor. Any appeals must be submitted within ten working days of the original decision. All appeals will be considered within ten working days of receipt.

RKEO Contacts

Please contact Rachel Clarke, RKEO Research Facilitator – clarker@bournemouth.ac.uk or Jo Garrad, RKEO Funding Development Manager – jgarrad@bournemouth.ac.uk if you wish to submit an expression of interest.