Category / BU research

MIDIRS reproduced Afghanistan paper

Dr. Rachel Arnold’s paper ‘Parallel worlds: an ethnography of care in an Afghan maternity hospital’ [1] originally published in Social Science & Medicine (Elsevier) has been reprinted in full in MIDIRS.  This is quite an accolade and should help this paper reach a wider audience.  Rachel graduated with a Ph.D. from the Faculty of Health & Social Sciences in 2016, illustrating that some of the best papers get into print (long) after completing one’s Ph.D. thesis.

 

 

Reference:

  1. Arnold, R., van Teijlingen, E., Ryan, K., Holloway, I. (2018) Parallel worlds: an ethnography of care in an Afghan maternity hospital, Social Science & Medicine 126:33-40.

BU-Community Partnership Workshop (Refugee & Migrant Leisure Network)

Dr. Jaeyeon Choe, Dr. Varuni Wimalasiri, Dr. Nicola De Martini Ugolottiand, and Dr. Jayne Caudwell in Faculty of Management organised the Refugee and Migrant Leisure Network workshop on December 5th with community partners including Dorset Race Equality Council and Unity in Vision.

During the two-hour workshop, we discussed how to support refugee and migrant communities in Dorset including ‘vocation’ and language learning. We also discussed other mechanisms that help their re-settlement and integration such as cooking workshops, community events, music and art, all which might provide a broader scope of support such as social and emotional/psychological well-being.

We agreed that we need to listen to refugee and migrant ‘voices’ for their settlement, integration, meaning making and well-being in order to develop supportive programmes. It’s often seen that existing programmes don’t meet what refugee and migrant populations actually need. There is an urgent need to listen to their problems, challenges, so as to develop effective support programmes.

We also discussed ‘qualitative’ data that community organisations often collect including stories, lived experiences and anecdotes do not communicate well with policy makers. What will be an effective strategy to convert the ‘messy’ data (from community events, sport, music, and art) into policy making? This is a challenge for both community organisations and researchers.

Our community partners also shared that they are facing new challenges (ie funding). All councils and community organisations face difficulties in developing, managing and ‘sustaining’ support systems for refugee and migrant populations. Whilst discussing the role of a local university when supporting refugee and migrant issues, securing some funding can be one area to work on for both researchers and community groups. For example, Dr. Jaeyeon Choe recently applied for a grant with two of the community partners to support their activities as well as her own research. The proposal focuses on Syrian refugee resettlement, belonging, subjective well-being and community ‘food’ events in rural UK. We are also looking into larger/future collaborative funding opportunities together.

For BU academics, it was very fruitful to listen to and learn from community workers about refugee and migrant issues in Dorset and beyond. Besides the productive discussions, it was inspiring to see people who are passionate about supporting and working hard for refugee and migrant communities!

If you are interested in our network, please follow us:
https://m.facebook.com/groups/400355213641367?tsid=0.41635546925909617&source=result

Introduction to Good Clinical Practice – 17th January 2019

Are you interested in running your own research project within the NHS? Good Clinical Practice, or ‘GCP’, is a requirement for those wishing to work on clinical research projects in a healthcare setting.

GCP is the international ethical, scientific and practical standard to which all clinical research is conducted. By undertaking GCP, you’re able to demonstrate the rights, safety and wellbeing of your research participants are protected, and that the data collected are reliable.

The next GCP full day session is scheduled for Thursday 17th January, at Bournemouth University, Lansdowne Campus (Executive Business Centre) – 8:45am – 4:30pm.

The day will comprise of the following sessions:

  • Introduction to research and the GCP standards;
  • Preparing to deliver your study;
  • Identifying and recruiting participants – eligibility and informed consent;
  • Data collection and ongoing study delivery;
  • Safety reporting;
  • Study closure.

If you’re interested in booking a place, please contact Research Ethics.

Remember that support is on offer at BU if you are thinking of introducing your research ideas into the NHS – email the Research Ethics mailbox, and take a look at the Clinical Governance blog.

RKEO alternative 12 days ‘to’ Christmas – 2 new FDT members

On the second day to Christmas, my RKEO friend gave to me, 2 new FDT members.

Welcome to Theresa McManus, Funding Development Coordinator, and Ainar Blaudums, Research Facilitator – International.

Theresa provides support to the University-wide Research and Knowledge Exchange Development Framework, (RKEDF), which incorporates a suite of pathways providing developmental support to academics at every stage of their careers.

Theresa specifically provides support to the Research Facilitators, the Funding Development Manager, and the Research and Knowledge Exchange Development Framework Facilitator within RKEO.

Theresa enjoys being efficient, proactive and having a variety of different activities to work on. She is a sustainability champion, cycles to work and is a keen environmentalist and gardener.

Ainar works across all faculties Tuesday to Friday as a single point of contact for bids and proposals to international funders. Within the Funding Development Team, the aim of his work is to contribute towards the growth of EU and international research activity across the University. Ainar’s responsibilities include scanning strategic agendas of EU and international research funders, supporting principal investigators in strengthening their applications, ensuring the proposal meets the funder’s strategic aims and supporting the FD Officers with his expertise of EU and international funding.

For more than a decade, Ainar has been involved in both pre- and post-award activities related to EU and international funding. His strengths are extensive experience of working for government, academia and industry, collaborating internationally and across different disciplines.

Ainar enjoys travelling overseas, gardening and appreciates all the nice and simple things that life provides.

REF Internal Review Panels – Recruiting Now!

To help us prepare for our upcoming submission to the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2021 we are establishing a number of internal review panels to review and assess BU’s research outputs and impact case studies.

Expressions of Interest (EoI) are invited from academic staff who are interested in being a Panel Member. There will be one panel per Unit of Assessment (UOA) listed below. Those interested should identify which UOA Panel they would like to be considered for and put forward a short case (suggested length of one paragraph) as to why they are interested in the role and what they think they could bring to it. EoIs should be emailed to ref@bournemouth.ac.uk by 14th December 2018.

UOA Teams would particularly welcome EoIs from those who have:

  • Experience reviewing for previous REF stocktake exercises
  • Experience in editorship
  • Experience peer review

Full details of the role, the process of recruitment and terms of reference for the panels themselves can be found here.

Any queries regarding a specific panel should be directed to the UOA Leader. General enquiries should be directed to Shelly Anne Stringer, RKEO.

Unit of Assessment UOA Leader(s)
2 Public Health, Health Services and Primary Care Prof. Edwin Van Teijlingen
3 Allied Health Professions, Dentistry, Nursing and Pharmacy
4 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience Dr. Peter Hills
11 Computer Science and Informatics Prof. Hamid Bouchachia
12 Engineering Prof. Zulfiqar Khan
14 Geography and Environmental Studies Prof. Rob Britton
15  Archaeology Prof. Kate Welham and Prof. Holger Schutkowski
17 Business and Management Studies Prof. Dean Patton
18 Law Dr Sascha-Dominik Bachman
20 Social Work and Social Policy Prof. Jonathan Parker
23 Education Prof. Julian McDougall and Prof. Debbie Holley
24 Sport and Exercise Sciences, Leisure and Tourism Prof. Tim Rees (Sport) Prof. Adam Blake (Tourism)
27 English Language and Literature Prof. Bronwen Thomas
32 Art and Design: History, Practice and Theory Prof. Jian Chang
33 Music, Drama, Dance, Performing Arts, Film and Screen Studies Prof. Kerstin Stutterheim
34 Communication, Cultural and Media Studies, Library and Information Management Prof. Iain MacRury

 

RKEO alternative 12 days ‘to’ Christmas – A proposal in a pear tree

Apologies that this is a brutalisation of the Christmas song, but we wanted to share with you 12 useful bits of information in the days leading up to the Christmas break (yeh, 12 working days to go!).  Here comes the first one!

On the first day to Christmas, my RKEO friend gave to me, a proposal in a pear tree.  Click here to see the BU application timeline – your guide to applying for external RKE funding. This also shows who can support you within RKEO and has useful links to the support on offer from the RKE Development Framework, and the all important intention to bid form.

phinder – connecting researchers with public health professionals

The NIHR Public Health Research (PHR) Programme has supported the development of a new portal called phinder, which connects public health practice and research. The aim of the portal is to publicise new and forthcoming UK interventions that may have an impact on population health.

phinder helps connect researchers with public health professionals so that discussion can take place surrounding research possibilities. You can tell phinder about your own intervention and they will display on the portal. Alternatively you can take a look yourself to see whether you would be interested in evaluating any of the listed interventions.

UK hits milestone of sequencing 100,000 whole genomes in the NHS

Yesterday it was announced that the 100,000 Genomes Project, led by Genomics England in partnership with the NHS, has reached its goal of sequencing 100,000 whole genomes from NHS patients.

The project was launched in 2012 by former Prime Minister David Cameron. BU is on board with this project and has access to the data collected, providing great opportunities for research.

You can read the NIHR article here.

100 voices that made the BBC: Pioneering Women

The ‘100 Voices that made the BBC: Pioneering Women’ website was launched Saturday 1st December 2018, looking into the history of women’s involvement in the BBC, showcasing oral histories that have been recorded over the last 50 years but were never made publically available. The content is produced, almost, exclusively by academics, including Bournemouth University’s Dr Kate Murphy, Principal Academic and Programme Leader of BU’s BA History course. Many great images, videos and archival documents can also be found on the website.

Before teaching at BU, Dr Kate Murphy worked at the BBC for 24 years, primarily as a producer on Radio 4’s ‘Woman’s Hour’, alongside studying for her part-time PhD at Goldsmiths, University of London. Her doctoral thesis from 2011 was re-written as a book, titled ‘Behind the wireless: An early history of women at the BBC’ and published by Palgrave Macmillan in 2016. She is now heavily involved in the ‘Connected Histories of the BBC’ project.

The ‘100 voices that made the BBC: Pioneering Women’ website is the fifth website created as part of the 5 year Arts and Humanities Research council (AHRC) funded project, headed by Professor David Hendy from the University of Sussex. The project is set to create a new digital catalogue of hundreds of rarely seen and heard audio and video interviews with former BBC staff and is linked to the forth coming centenary of the BBC in 2022.

Dr Kate Murphy’s expertise in the history of the BBC as a result of her 24 years of work put her in good stead to help curate the content of the website. She has worked closely with Dr Jeannine Baker of Macquarie University in Sydney, Deputy Director of the Centre for Media History, which BU’s Centre for Media History has a close working relationship with. Together, they have produced the overall shape of the Pioneering Women project, with Dr Kate Murphy further writing and curating 4 of the ‘essays’ on the site; ‘Early Pioneers’, ‘Women’s Programmes’, ‘Equal Opportunities?’ and ‘In Control’ all providing a deeper look into women in the BBC and the opportunities they had access to.

The 100 voices website, one part of the series ‘Connected Histories of the BBC’ project can be viewed here: https://www.bbc.co.uk/historyofthebbc/women-pioneers

Furthermore, Dr Kate Murphy has produced a research blog for BBC History, connected to the work she has undertaken on the Pioneering Women website. The blog places focus on Isa Benzie and Janet Quigley, the two women who ran the BBC’s Foreign Department for a large proportion of the 1930s. The blog can be accessed here.

EPSRC Engineering advent calendar

In support of the 2018 Year of Engineering, a year-long government led (Department of Transport) campaign to celebrate UK engineering and increase awareness and understand what engineers do, EPSRC have created a ‘fun’ Engineering advent calendar.

Every day, from now until Christmas, you can click on the doors (for the link above) to find out how engineering impacts on our everyday lives.

Enjoy!

Two-day Workshop in Creative Writing for Academics now open!

Creative Writing for Academics

Workshop with Kip Jones

11 & 12 January 2019

Friday (10- 3) and Saturday (10-2),

11th and 12th January in EBC.

FREE! But you must register 

(email: kipworld@gmail.com)

and commit to participating for the two full days.

All are very welcome: students, staff & academics.

Places are limited and will fill up quickly.

  • By engaging in creative writing, it becomes possible for all to write more clearly, more simply, even more creatively, when writing for academic publication.

  • The workshop will present opportunities to work with new and creative levels through interfaces with techniques from the arts and humanities—fiction, poetry, auto-ethnography and biography, scriptwriting, techniques from filmmaking, including tags and loglines.

  • These intellectual exchanges encourage joint exploration of how authors can engage with principles and tools from the arts in order to expand and extend the possibilities of reaching wider audiences.

Read all about an earlier experience with the Creative Writing Workshop

TODAY: PGR Live Exhibition – All Welcome

Wednesday 5 December | 13:00 – 16:00 | K103 Kimmeridge House | Talbot Campus

Drop-in to discover this unique display of research being undertaken by our postgraduate researchers. Interact with live displays, listen to recordings and explore a wealth of research posters and photographs.

What’s on display?

The Doctoral College look forward to seeing you there.

#PGRLE18

 

Free FutureLearn courses

The FutureLearn website has a whole host of different courses you can take advantage of whether for personal interest or educational needs, and for free.

Here are some courses that are specific to (clinical) research. Enjoy! –

*to be done in addition to the mandatory ethics modules.

#DataSavesLives – using patient data for research

Patient data underpins and leads to improvements in research and care.

The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) has recently shared a resource surrounding the use of patient data in clinical research. The page contains a number of useful links to guidance such as the NHS pages on why patients’ data matters and also the Understanding Patient Data resource, which outlines a set of key principles that should be followed in using patient data for research purposes.

Acknowledging contribution

It’s important that if a researcher uses patient data, that they acknowledge it by using the following citation –

“This work uses data provided by patients and collected by the NHS as part of their care and support”

The above has been developed by use MY data, a movement of patients, carers and relatives, in place to ensure that the patient data used is protected by the appropriate safeguards, and is treated with the respect and confidentiality it deserves.

National data opt-out programme

The page likewise signposts the above programme which allows patients and the public to opt-out of their confidential patient information being used for planning and research purposes.

All health and care organisation will uphold these choices by March 2020.