Category / BU research

Centre for Qualitative Research Update

CQR’s webpages have now migrated to the new Centres and Institutes pages of the Bournemouth University website.  We are in the progress of refreshing and updating the new pages, but you can still connect to the old CQR webpages, at least for the time-being. It is here that you can find links to many of the specialisations of members including

Humanising Health and Social Care

Novel and Innovative Research Methodologies;  

Performative Social Science and Arts-led Research;

Narrative and Biographic Research

CQR News

Humanisation Conference

Humanising Care, Health & Wellbeing
13-14th June 2019

The Humanisation approach is supported by working practices which encourage connection to personal experience and research approaches which privilege subjective experience and knowing. Organised and led by CQR’s Deputy Director, Caroline Ellis-Hill.

CQR Members presenting at the Conference include: Camila Devis-Rozental, Caroline Ellis-Hill, Chantel Cox, Clare Gordon, Karen Rees, Lee Ann Fenge, Liz Norton, and Sally Lee.

Publications

CQR Members, Associates, and Doctoral Students are also busy writing. Below, just a taster from a range of members’ recent wide variety of methods and subject matter, now in press or about to be. CQR members come from across FHSS departments and several other BU Faculties. CQR and CEL have particular synergies around creativity in research and education. Many faculty claim membership in both Centres!

Assoc. Member Lee-Ann Fenge:

Fenge, L., Oakley, L., Taylor, B. and Beer, S. (in press) The impact of sensitive research on the researcher: preparedness and positionality, International Journal of Qualitative Methods

Fenge, L., Melacca, D, Lee, S. and Rosenorn-Lanng, E. (in press) Older peoples’ preferences and challenges when using digital technology: a systematic review with particular reference to digital games, International Journal of Education and Ageing

Fenge, L. Cutts, W. and Seagrave, J. 2018. Understanding homelessness through poetic inquiry: looking into the shadows, Social Work and Social Sciences Review, 19 (3), 119-133

BU Visiting Prof Catherine Hennessy:

Hennessy, C.H. and Means, R. (2018). “Connectivity of Older People in Rural Areas”, Chapter 8 in A. Walker (ed.) The New Dynamics of Ageing, Bristol: Policy Press.

Member Camilla Devis-Rozental:

Devis-Rozental.C. (2018). Developing Socio-Emotional Intelligence in Higher Education Scholars. London: Palgrave Macmillan.

Member Jo Thurston:

Thurston, J., 2020. Opening a Door to a Private World: Using Auto/biographical Methodology to Explore Health Experience. SAGE Methods Cases.

Assoc. Member Carly Stewart:

Sparkes, A. C. & Stewart, C. 2019. Stories as actors causing trouble in lives: a dialogical narrative analysis of a competitive cyclist and the fall from grace of Lance Armstrong. Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health

Stewart, C., Woodward, M. and Gough, R., 2019. ‘I’ve drawn, like, someone who was the world’: drawings as embodied gestures of lived yoga experience. Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health.

CQR Director Kip Jones, Member Jo Thurston, Assoc. Member Louise Oliver

Thurston and Oliver prepare for the interview

Jones was invited by Sage Publications’ MethodSpace to write a blog article for their June/July Special Issue on Creativity. Kip transcribed his interview on biographic research conducted by CQR members, Joanna Thurston and Louise Oliver. The pair interviewed Jones, along with several other academics, for their film, “It’s not research, it’s just stories!”  The film was screened at the British Sociological Association Auto/Biography Study Group Conference in December 2018. Kip Jones discusses “Biography, Auto-biography, and Creativity” in the MethodSpace blog piece.

Assoc. Member Lorraine Brown:

Kichuk, A; Brown, L; Ladkin, A 2019 Talent pool exclusion: the hotel employee perspective International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management

Member Jenny Hall:

Crowther, A. Stephen & J. Hall (2019) Association of psychosocial–spiritual experiences around childbirth and subsequent perinatal mental health outcomes: an integrated review, Journal of Reproductive and Infant Psychology.

Assoc. Members Janet Scammell, Vanessa Heaslip, Karen Cooper

Rosser, E., Scammell, J., Heaslip, V., White, S., Phillips, J., Cooper, K., Donaldson, I., Hemingway, A., (2019). Caring values in undergraduate nurse students: a qualitative longitudinal study. Nurse Education Today.

Member Michele Board, Associate Member Vanessa Heaslip

Board, M., Pigott, L., Olive, H. and Heaslip, V., 2019. Better Together – A Day Hospital’s move towards Integrated care. International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation.

CQR Members Presenting and Video Conferencing

Kip Jones held a successful video session for the recent Social Fiction Conference at the Morgan Centre for Research into Everyday Lives at the University of Manchester. He will be conducting another session via video link with postgrad students at Nazarbayev University Graduate School of Education in Kazakhstan in a few weeks’ time. Both sessions centre around the award-winning short film, RUFUS STONE and Jones’ part in creating it.

CQR Deputy Director Caroline Ellis-Hill:

Ellis-Hill C, Lamont –Robinson C & Galvin K (2019) Sustaining wellbeing after a stroke: reflections on humanising lifeworld processes within an Arts and Health group – HeART of stroke EACS conference – Sustainable Caring for Health and Wellbeing Oct 1st -3rd 2019 Åbo Akademi University, Vaasa, Finland

Paglioni M, Ellis-Hill C, Board M and Branney, J and Valentine J (2019) Exploring the experience of older people who attend a hospital …  The British Society of Gerontology 48th Annual Conference:  University of Liverpool 10 -12 July 2019.

Doctoral student, Charlotte Clayton, has a poster accepted for presentation about her PhD research fort the University of Southampton conference, ‘Pregnancy, Maternity and the Self’ 21st June.

Assoc. Member Trevor Hearing presented:

“The Scholarly Studio: The Application of the Television Studio as a Performative Research Tool” at: Creative Practice Research in the Age of NeoLiberal Hopelessness 10-12 May 2018 University of Bedfordshire. 

CQR members Lee-Ann Fenge, Kip Jones, Vanessa Heaslip Took part in the Charity Research Showcase at Bournemouth U.

Participants discussed their research with the charity sector and a wide range of charity partners.

Ideas, Ideas, Ideas!

Following on from yet another successful year of CQR Lunchtime Seminars, it is time now for CQR members, Associate Members and Doctoral Associates, to be thinking of ideas for seminars for the next academic year. The theme for the year will be: “Methods to Our Madness!”  Informal talks followed by interactive discussions are the order of the day!

There certainly will NOT be time to explain a whole research method!  Instead, presenters are asked to informally talk about how they decided on a method for a piece of research, and perhaps how that worked out (or not!) for them.  CQR audiences are particularly interested in what we might call the application of ‘Creative Methods” in research! 

CQR members are asked to submit ideas now as it takes time to organise the calendar for these ahead of time. Please send your thoughts via email to Kip.

 

 

New research website launched

The new research section of the BU website is now live, following the conclusion of a project between Marketing & Communications (M&C) and Research Development & Support (RDS) to redevelop and migrate the previous research website.

The aim of the project was to increase the profile of our research activities and strengths, leading to better outcomes around our research from website visitors, which could include:

  • Additional research funding,
  • Collaboration and partnership,
  • Expanding international reputation,
  • Consultancy,
  • Expanding publishing and media coverage.

The new pages prominently profile our research projects, research centres and institutes, as well as ways for members of the public to get involved in or find out more about our research events.  These pages will be added to over time, as new research projects and areas of impact emerge.

The old research microsite will be retired over the next couple of weeks, with page redirects in place to enable people to find the new content.

Training

If you would like to learn how to update the new website, then please do sign up for one of the upcoming training sessions:

  • 10:30am – 12:30pm, Friday 7 June,
  • 10:30am – 12:30pm, Monday 10 June.

You can book on to these sessions by emailing Dan Ford (dford@bournemouth.ac.uk) in M&C.

Further training sessions will be announced in due course.  Please contact Rachel Bowen (rbowen@bournemouth.ac.uk) if you would like to attend one.

Photo of the week

The photo of the week series is a weekly series featuring photos taken by our academics and students for our Research Photography Competition, which provides a snapshot of some of the incredible research undertaken across the BU community.

This week’s photo of the week, ‘Diana painting trees of life in her family shop,’ is by Paola Vizcaino, a lecturer in Events Management.

The picture is part of my personal collection from the ethnographic research I conducted for my PhD in Tourism Studies (2013-2016). I investigated women’s processes of empowerment in relation to their work as producers and vendors of handicraft pottery catered to the tourist market in central Mexico.

Diana was one of the research participants who shared her story with me:

“Ah, a nivel personal, a mí me encanta. Nos cambió a todos, nos cambió la vida porque, vamos, el hacer artesanías nos abre otro mundo ¿no? Aparte de que de esto vivimos, nos adentró en un mundo muy especial. Yo creo que el conocer a mucha gente de todos los tipos y clases sociales, yo creo que el trabajo de uno habla por sí solo, pero sí nos cambió la vida… Me encanta mi trabajo.”

Translation:

Ah, on a personal level, I love it. It changed us all, it changed our lives because, come on, making handicraft pottery opens another world, right? Apart from the fact that we make a living out of this, we entered into a very special world. I think that knowing a lot of people of all types and social classes, I believe that one’s work speaks for itself, but it did change our lives … I love my work.

CROS and PIRLS close this week. Don’t miss out!

Time is running out….

These important surveys close this week, on Friday, 31st May.

If you have already received your invite and not yet responded, please do so now. This week’s reminder, with all the details needed to access the survey, was sent to all individuals invited to reply on 28th May. The reply rate for both surveys is under 30% (at 28/5/19) – it is time to make your opinions count!

Although, you may wish to be helpful, please do not share this access email with others – this is so we can ensure that the reply rate is accurate.

If you have not received your invitation to complete these surveys  and you fall in one or both of the categories below (based on the census date of 22/4/19), please contact Emily Cieciura (Research Development & Support) via researchdev@bournemouth.ac.uk to receive your personal invitation.

Thank you to everyone who has already replied.


More information:

Every two years Vitae runs the Careers in Research Online Survey and the Principal Investigators and Research Leaders Survey. Once again, BU will be participating in these important national surveys.

ThCareers in Research Online Survey CROS logoe Careers in Research Online Survey (CROS) gathers the anonymous views of research staff in UK higher education institutions about their experiences, career aspirations and career development opportunities. At BU, those categorised by HR data as research staff will receive an invitation to complete this survey.

Principal-Investigators-and-Research-Leaders-Survey-PIRLS-logoThe Principal Investigators and Research Leaders Survey (PIRLS) gathers anonymous views and experiences from principal investigators in relation to their role as managers and leaders of researchers and research groups. Based on data from RED (BU’s Research & Enterprise Database), and HR records, relevant BU academics will be invited to participate.

Both surveys are beneficial to BU:

  • Together they inform our policy and practice in researchers’ employment, management and career development
  • Provide knowledge of the views and experiences of research leaders across topics, including leadership, management and recognition
  • The surveys allow us to measure our progress over time and confidential comparisons with groups of institutions or national results
  • Provides evidence to support our institutional submissions, such as for the European HR Excellence in Research Award (we have recently retained this award following the recent six year review), implementation of the Concordat and Athena SWAN
  • They provide insight into the research environment element of the Research Excellence Framework

If you have any queries about either survey, please contact Emily Cieciura (Research Development & Support) via researchdev@bournemouth.ac.uk

 

New publication: Job Satisfaction and Employee Turnover Determinants in High Contact Services: Insights from Employees’ Online Reviews,

NEW PAPER: Stamolampros, P., Korfiatis, N., Chalvatzis, K., Buhalis, D., 2019, Job Satisfaction and Employee Turnover Determinants in High Contact Services: Insights from Employees’ Online Reviews, Tourism Management,  Vol.75, Dec. pp.130-147, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tourman.2019.04.030

Abstract

We explore a special case of electronic word of mouth that of employees’ online reviews to study the determinants of job satisfaction and employee turnover. We perform our analysis using a novel dataset of 297,933 employee online reviews from 11,975 US tourism and hospitality firms, taking advantage of both the review score and text.

Leadership and cultural values are found to be better predictors of high employee satisfaction, while career progression is critical for employee turnover. One unit increase in the rating for career progression reduces the likelihood of an employee to leave a company by 14.87%.  Additionally, we quantify the effect of job satisfaction on firm profitability, where one unit increase leads to an increase between 1.2 and 1.4 in ROA. 

We do not find evidence supporting the reverse relationship, that growth on firm profitability increases job satisfaction. The feedback to management in employee reviews provides specific managerial implications.

Highlights

•We use online reviews to evaluate job satisfaction and employee turnover factors for tourism and hospitality firms.
•297,933 employee review ratings and texts for 11,975 U.S tourism and hospitality firms from Glassdoor are analyzed.
•A recent extension of probabilistic topic modeling the Structural Topic Model (STM) is used for the text analysis.
•A one unit increase of the rating for career opportunities decreases the likelihood of an employee to leave by 14.87%.
•An increase by one star in the overall rating of a company is linked with an increase between 1.2 and 1.4 of ROA.

Ageing & Dementia Research Centre

In the spirit of Dementia Awareness Week (20th-26th May), we would like to talk to you about Bournemouth University’s Ageing & Dementia Research Centre (ADRC).

850,000 people in the UK are estimated to be living with dementia. Almost 5% of those over 65 in the UK have recorded prevalence of the disorder.

Dementia is caused when the brain is damaged by diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease or strokes. Dementia describes a set of symptoms that may include memory loss or difficulties with problem solving or language.

The ADRC is led by Professor Jane Murphy and Professor Jan Weiner, supported by staff and students from the Faculty for Health & Social Sciences and the Faculty of Science and Technology.

The centre’s research is significantly impacting theory, education and professional practice around dementia. The extensive lists of researchers who are part of the project aim to collate expertise to develop person-centred research which will improve the lives of people with dementia and their families.

Research can be categorised by three broad titles: ‘Developing Ageing & Dementia Friendly Environments’, ‘Nutrition & Wellbeing’ and ‘Activity & Social Inclusion’. Each topic builds on a wealth of research knowledge and projects already taking place at BU.

For example, under ‘Activity & Social Inclusion’, research intervention and evaluations are driving innovative best practice in health promotion and social care delivery, enabling carers and families to support those with dementia.

To hear from Professor Jane Murphy about her research and experience at the recent ‘Charity Impact Networking Day’ follow this link.

Follow the ADRC on twitter here.

Contact ADRC:

Email: ADRC@bournemouth.ac.uk
Telephone: 01202 962536

Photo of the week

The photo of the week series is a weekly series featuring photos taken by our academics and students for our Research Photography Competition, which provides a snapshot of some of the incredible research undertaken across the BU community.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This week’s photo of the week, ‘Happy Place,’ is by Chloe Casey, a PGR student from the faculty of Health and Social Sciences.

This photograph represents my ‘happy place’ where I escape my all-consuming doctoral research. The PhD experience is said to be difficult, autonomous and characterised by high workloads and pressure, so it is important that postgraduate researchers are encouraged to prioritise their own well-being throughout the journey. There has been much interest in the mental health of undergraduate students but there is limited research exploring factors underpinning the mental well-being of postgraduate research students specifically. However, preliminary results suggest a high risk of stress, anxiety and burnout in this population. It is documented that the organisational stressors that doctoral students experience can impact academic performance and attrition, but these require further exploration. Postgraduate researchers are often part of wider research teams and their output provides scientific advancement, societal and institutional benefits therefore programme attrition can pose significant personal and financial costs. Our research is concerned with exploring and understanding the promotion of well-being in doctoral students and developing methods to promote their mental health and resilience so they are best supported to thrive academically, achieve their personal goals and successfully complete their planned research.

NIHR RDS Residential Research Retreat 26-28 November 2019 – Applications open NOW

Do you have a great idea for a research project?

Are you planning to apply for research funding?

Do you need a dedicated period of quality time with support to develop your research project?

Dillington House, Somerset. 26 – 28 November 2019.

Applications NOW OPEN

The Residential Research Retreat provides protected time with expert coaching and support for you to develop your research proposal to the standard required to be competitive in seeking high quality research funding.

Register your interest with us by filling in the form here

And don’t forget, your local branch of the NIHR RDS (Research Design Service) is based within the BU Clinical Research Unit (BUCRU) on the 5th floor of Royal London House. Feel free to pop in and see us, call us on 61939 or send us an email.

Charity Impact Networking Day

Last Monday the 13th of May, the Charity Impact Networking Day was attended in fantastic numbers at Talbot campus, Kimmeridge House.

The day consisted of two well attended events. The morning session, ‘Charity Research Showcase’ was a display of academic work, presented on stalls for various visiting charities to engage with.

Academic attendees included Professor Jane Murphy of the Faculty for Health and Social Science. She says that she had a very successful session in showcasing her centre’s research and in speaking to multiple charity representatives who may be involved in future project collaborations.

The afternoon ‘SteamLab’ session was a chance to work within groups of academics and charities to identify research themes and possible project collaborations for the future.

It was fantastic to hear plans for funding applications due to networking introductions.

   

Thank you to all academics and charities that attended both morning and afternoon sessions.

There were some great discussions of possible future project collaborations. It was also brilliant to see many people leave with key contacts.

A final special thank you to Professor Lee-Ann Fenge, Dr Fiona Cownie, Ian Jones, Rachel Clarke and Connor Tracy for organising and running the events.

Reminder: Research Ethics Panel meetings in August

Planning Ahead – A Reminder for Staff and Postgraduate Researchers

If you’re hoping to start data collection activities in September and are in the process of completing your research ethics checklist, please remember that during August there are NO Research Ethics Panel (REP) Meetings.  If you want to start your data collection activity in August/September, please submit your checklist in time for final Panel meetings to be held in June and July.  Checklists received during August which need to be reviewed by full Panel will be deferred until September (dates to be advised).

REPs review all staff projects and postgraduate research projects which have been identified as above minimal risk through the online ethics checklist.  Details on what constitutes high risk can be found on the research ethics blog.

There are two central REPs:

  • Science, Technology & Health
  • Social Sciences & Humanities Research Ethics Panel

Staff/PGR above minimal risk projects are reviewed by full REP and Researchers (including PGR Supervisors) are normally invited to Panel for discussions.

Staff low risk projects are reviewed by member(s) of REP via email.

Staff Projects which are ‘low risk’

Reviews for low risk projects will continue as normal during August, although turnaround may be longer than normal due to Reviewer availability during this month.

PGR Projects which are ‘low risk’

The review and approval process for low risk PGR projects continues as standard.

More details about the review process and REP meeting dates can be found on the Research Ethics Blog.  Email enquiries should be sent to researchethics@bournemouth.ac.uk.

Royal Academy of Engineering visit Bournemouth University on 15th May 2019

The Faculty of Science and Technology and Research Development and Support were pleased to welcome Programme Managers, Dr Chung-Chin Kao and Keir Bonnar from the Royal Academy of Engineering on Wednesday, 15th May 2019.

The Royal Academy of Engineering provides a wealth of information regarding their support for engineering as the UK’s national academy for engineering and technology, where engineering is taken in its broadest sense, underpinning our daily lives, driving economic growth, playing a critical role in addressing major societal challenges and helping ensure our readiness for the future, from providing a sustainable supply of food, water and clean energy, to advancing healthcare, and keeping us safe and secure, with alignment to the BU2025 vision. Read more about what they do.

The visit commenced with a tour of the Faculty of Science and Technology’s Innovation Centre, lead by BU’s Dr Philip Sewell, Head of Department – Design & Engineering, where staff and students were seen in action, including those preparing for the forthcoming BU Festival of Design & Engineering. Following discussions with senior faculty academics, Chung-Chin and Keir provided an overview of the funding schemes available to BU staff, stressing the importance of working with industrial partners. Schemes are available to support research at all career levels.

For those in academia, the Royal Academy of Engineering supports schemes for undergraduates, and postgraduates, exchanges between academia and industryresearchers, international collaborative research, public engagement and entrepreneurial activity.  The events calendar is also worth watching with more events to be added to increase engagement with the Academy.

In addition, materials for HE are promoted on their dedicated HE Focus website. This includes:

If you were unable to attend today’s event, the slides are available to BU staff. To make sure that you stay up to date, sign up to receive updates or follow on social media

 

Narrative Research Group Talk on Making an Interactive Biography

The final NRG talk of this academic year will take place on 29 May 2019 in F307 4-6 p.m.

Dr Lisa Gee will speak about the thinking behind, and the process of making the interactive biography – or “zoeography” – of William Hayley (1745-1820), created for her PhD in Digital Writing by Practice at Bath Spa University with developer Michael Kowalski.

 

  • Why didn’t she just write a book?
  • What were the challenges she faced in developing the narrative and designing the reader journey?
  • How did the collaboration work?

 

She will also discuss her work at the Fitzwilliam Museum, where, with a fabulous team of colleagues, she’s working on Most Sacred Things: a pilot digital edition of Hayley’s correspondence.

A short video introduction to HayleyWorld can be found here.

Lisa Gee is Post-Doctoral Research Associate on the Ego-Media Project in the Centre for Life-Writing Research at King’s College, London, External Research Consultant in the Department of Manuscripts and Printed Books at the Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge, and a freelance writer, editor, facilitator and videographer. She is the author of Stage Mum, Friends: Why Men and Women Are From the Same Planet, and the editor of Bricks Without Mortar: the selected poems of Hartley Coleridge. She judges the New Media Writing Prize, and the Association for Professional Staffing Companies (APSCo) Awards for Excellence for Diversity & Inclusion and for Best Corporate Social Responsibility Initiative.

Can VR reveal a hidden skill?

Emteq launch public research study at London Science Museum 

 

Ifigeneia Mavridou, Research Engineer at Bournemouth University’s Centre for Digital Entertainment, will conduct a live experiment with help from members of the public at the London Science Museum for the next six weeks.

Ifigeneia is currently on a three year industrial placement with Emteq – A technology company developing novel sensors to provide new insights into how we interact with the virtual world.

Emteq – a Brighton based start-up – is helping researchers to unpick the factors that influence how we respond to new experiences.  Built into a virtual reality headset, their sensors will be able to provide feedback on the user’s emotional state as they respond to different scenarios.

The research project will be conducted in collaboration with Bournemouth University and is expected to be the largest ever study with VR using physiological sensors. Visitors to the Science Museum will have an opportunity to contribute to the new field of research that may revolutionise the treatment of mental health conditions.

While exact details of the experiment are being kept under wraps, it will explore the capabilities of VR to uncover the skills, capabilities and competencies of users as they explore virtual scenes.

Dr Charles Nduka, research lead and co-founder of Emteq, said: “Developing new treatments requires an understanding of the range of “normal’ responses to interventions, particularly for important healthcare issues such as anxiety and depression. In the past, members of the public contributed to the human genome project, which in turn has enabled many new treatments to be developed. We hope that over the next six weeks, with the help of the public, we will begin the process of understanding the range of behavioral responses that will act as a baseline for future research and treatments of mental health conditions.”

Dr Ellen Seiss Deputy Head of Research at the Department of Psychology, Bournemouth University, said: “Virtual reality offers an opportunity to have a virtual laboratory to study human behaviours. There is promising evidence that VR could be very useful to study the interaction between emotion and cognition.  This could help treatment several mental health disorders with emotional regulation deficits such as anxiety related disorders. This research will begin that process of discovery.”

 

This live event will be taking place at the London Science Museum, in the “Who Am I” exhibit, Level 1 from 8th May – 16th June.