Category / BU research

PGR Virtual Poster Exhibition

PGR Virtual Poster Exhibition

Tomorrow kicks off the PGR Virtual Poster Exhibition. Over the next two weeks we will be highlighting the PGR posters submitted as part of the 12th Annual Postgraduate Research Conference across the research and faculty blogs.

You can also view the full poster exhibition on the conference webpage.

There is still time to register to attend the conference oral presentations and keynote talk, taking place on Wednesday 2 December. All BU students & staff are welcome.

If any of this research inspires you to undertake your own research degree, please do get in touch with our dedicated admissions team.

Writing a Data Management Plan – Steps for a successful application

This is an image that displays an infographic of connected aspects of the research life cycle. The text that is part of the image reads as: Plan to make data work for you; Data Management Plans that meet institutional funder requirements.  DMPonline helps you to create, review, and share data management plans that meet institutional and funder requirements. It is provided by the Digital Curation Centre (DCC).

Image captured from the official website of DMP Online (Accessed 27 November 2020).

What is a Data Management Plan? 

Data Management Plans (DMPs) document how data generated during a research project will be managed and preserved for reuse. Funders are taking this increasingly seriously and are evaluating the strength of DMPs when assessing bids for research funding. 

Who does it apply to? 

Staff undertaking research and PGRs. 

What is DMP Online? 

DMP Online is a data management planning tool. Created by the Digital Curation Centre (DCC), it enables researchers to write DMPs using funder templates. It also benefits from: 

  • Integrated guidance 
  • Tools to enable collaboration with colleagues/supervisors/library support 

DMP Online is highly recommended, helping researchers to meet funder expectations. There is also a BU template for all other projects. 

Where to go for more information and support 

The Library has developed an extensive Research Data Management (RDM) guide, which includes guidance for DMPs. 

Email bordar@bournemouth.ac.uk for additional support. 

 

Image credit:

Digital Curation Centre, 2020. DMPonline [online]. Available at: https://dmponline.dcc.ac.uk/ [Accessed 27 November 2020].

ORCID reviewer recognition for UKRI reviewers

UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) has developed a new feature in its current funding systems to recognise formally the contributions of UKRI reviewers via ORCID, a unique identifier tool for individuals.

The implementation of ORCID reviewer recognition went live on 23 Nov. 2020. It will enable UKRI review contributions to be publicly displayed without compromising the anonymity and confidentiality of the assessment process. This will be done by issuing a ‘review credit’ that will be displayed in individual reviewers ORCID profiles.

To receive “ORCID review credits”, UKRI reviewers must hold an ORCID account and link their ORCID ID to their Je-S account. UKRI will only send ORCID review credits to the reviewers that submit a “usable review” via Je-S after 23 Nov. 2020. For more information, please see UKRIs webpage on how they recognise reviewer contribution, and the guidance on ORCID Reviewer Recognition for UKRI reviewers.

Guidance on external bids

RDS have worked with Faculty DDRPPs to ensure greater transparency around the recent changes to the bidding approval process, and to ensure that research remains a key activity for our academics.

We’ve produced a document, Guidance on External bids, which sets out the context for the changes, the temporary measures in place (including timings for bid preparation and parameters for funding opportunities), and the support available to you.

 

Virtual Coffee with IMSET

Thank you to those who attended the IMSET launch last week. We hope that you now have a better idea of who we are and what we are aiming to do.

As a follow-up, we will be holding a ‘virtual coffee with IMSET’ on Monday 30th November between 3.00pm and 4.00pm to enable more informal chat and discussion. We do hope you can make it.

Please contact SIA@bournemouth.ac.uk if you’d the meeting details.

The 12th Annual Postgraduate Research Conference Brochure

The 12th Annual Postgraduate Research Conference Brochure

I am delighted to be able to share the full conference brochure for The 12th Annual Postgraduate Research Conference.

The oral presentations are taking place virtually on Wednesday 2 November and there is still plenty of time to register to attend. We will also be joined by Professor Edwin van Teijlingen as our keynote speaker.

Register to attend, all BU staff and students welcome. 

All posters will be available for viewing on the conference webpage from Monday 30 November, with wider coverage across the research and Faculty blogs highlighting individual posters over the course of a few weeks.

I look forward to sharing the day with many of you.

New article just published: Stoyanova-Bozhkova, S., Paskova, T., & Buhalis, D. (2020). Emotional intelligence: a competitive advantage for tourism and hospitality managers. Tourism Recreation Research, 1-13.

New article just published: 

Stoyanova-Bozhkova, S., Paskova, T., & Buhalis, D. (2020). Emotional intelligence: a competitive advantage for tourism and hospitality managersTourism Recreation Research, 1-13.

https://doi.org/10.1080/02508281.2020.1841377

ABSTRACT 

The purpose of this paper is to provide a better understanding of tourism and hospitality management through exploring the perceptions of and the application of emotional intelligence (EI) in the practices of managers. The effect of EI on improving business performance is widely acknowledged in business and management studies. However, there is limited research in the context of tourism and hospitality industries. The paper contributes to the literature through a qualitative study of the perceptions and experiences of middle-level managers. Data was collected through semi-structured in-depth interviews conducted in tourism and hospitality organisations in the UK.

The findings of the study reveal that EI can have a positive contribution to improving staff satisfaction, motivation and overall business productivity. They highlight the importance of building quality relationships among staff and the critical role middle management has in an organisation. Based on the finding from the qualitative inquiry, the authors propose a model conceptualising the role of managers’ EI in creating a competitive advantage for the organisation. Practical implications are discussed and recommendations for further research are provided. 

KEYWORDS: Emotional intelligence, staff satisfaction, self-regulation, staff motivation, tourism and hospitality industries, qualitative methodology

emotional intelligence
emotional Intelligence Model
Manager Emotional Intelligence

Implications of Covid-19 on researcher development | Survey

Thank you to everyone who has already taken the time to participant in our online survey.

It’s the final few days left to participate in our research project online survey exploring the implications of Covid-19 on researcher development if you haven’t already.

Survey 1: For postgraduate researchers who have engaged in the Doctoral College: Researcher Development Programme over the past 12 months.

Survey 2: For Doctoral College: Researcher Development Programme workshop facilitators.

 

Closing date: Monday 30 November 2020.

If you have any questions about the research, please contact a member of the research team:

Natalie Stewart, Dr Martyn Polkinghorne, Dr Camila Devis-Rozental

Conversation article – Football and dementia: heading must be banned until the age of 18

Shutterstock/Wallenrock

Keith Parry, Bournemouth University; Eric Anderson, University of Winchester, and Howard Hurst, University of Central Lancashire

Alarm bells are ringing in sport about the risk of a group of chronic, neuro-degenerative diseases, commonly understood as dementia. There is an increasingly large body of evidence which has identified that small, repetitive collisions of the brain inside the skull cause this disease.

More high-profile players from England’s 1966 World Cup-winning squad are getting dementia and heading the football is to blame. It is now time for a blanket ban on heading until the age of 18, and from then on it should be closely monitored and reduced.

It is not just the big collisions that end with players being carried off the pitch or taken to hospital for tests that appear to be causing the problem. It is the small, daily collisions – the ones which happen with routine. Research has found that one particular form of dementia (known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy or CTE) seems to only exist among those who, as part of routine activities, incur these regular assaults to the brain.

What is CTE? Dr. Ann McKee explains.

This issue was touched upon in the improperly titled Will Smith movie Concussion (because the disease is located in thousands of small hits, not one big one) and the Netflix Documentary, Killer Inside, about the NFL player, Aaron Hernandez who suffered from CTE. Indeed, recent research on American football has shown that 3.5 years of play doubles the chances of dementia.

This issue is now gaining attention in the UK, with research showing a shift in attitudes in rugby union, and within the “Beautiful Game” as well.

Repetitive impacts

Jeff Astle, a member of England’s 1970 World Cup squad, became the first British footballer confirmed to have died from CTE – classed as an industrial injury. Astle’s family had long claimed it was heading the ball that was to blame. But it was only when England’s 1966 World Cup-winning heroes began to be diagnosed with dementia that the football world really took notice.

This link cannot be dismissed as a result of older, heavy balls that were replaced by lighter balls in recent years. This is a myth, as both older and new balls weigh 14-16oz. And while older balls got heavier when wet, they travelled slower and were less likely to be kicked to head height in games.

Recent studies show that heading the ball, even just 20 times in practice, causes immediate and measurable alterations to brain functioning. These results have been confirmed in other heading studies and are consistent with research on repetitive impacts that occur from other sports such as downhill mountain biking, resulting from riding over rough terrain.




Read more:
Tour de France: does pro-cycling have a concussion problem?


More worryingly, in a large study of former professional footballers in Scotland, when compared to matched controls, players were significantly more likely to both be prescribed dementia medications and to die from dementia – with a 500% increase in Alzheimer’s.

These findings finally pressured the FA into changing the rules for youth football. In February 2020, the FA denied direct causation but followed what America had done five years earlier and changed its guidelines concerning heading the ball.

The current guidelines don’t stop children from heading the ball in matches, but they do forbid heading the ball as part of training until the age of 12 – when it is gradually introduced. These measures do not go far enough.

A new campaign, called Enough is Enough, and an accompanying seven-point charter was launched in November which calls for a radical intervention into heading in football. Former England captains, Wayne Rooney and David Beckham have supported it, while 1966 legend Sir Geoff Hurst has also backed a ban on kids heading the ball.

And the players union, the PFA, has now called for heading in training by professional players to be reduced and monitored.

The demands in this charter will be costly, as they concern aftercare for those with dementia and more expensive research into the issue. But the most significant demand they make is to protect professional players from dementia by severely limiting header training to no more than 20 headers in any training session with at minimum of 48 hours between sessions involving heading.

These progressive policies should not be delayed by those in the sport, such as the medical head of world players’ union Fifpro, Dr Vincent Gouttebarge, who claimed that more research is required. Governing bodies can no longer take half measures or call for further discussion. This discussion has been taking place for 50 years.

Bring in the ban

Brain trauma in sport is not a medical question, it is a public health crisis. If the evidence is strong enough that the PFA has advocated “urgent action” to reduce heading in training for adult athletes, then heading policies for children – in both training and matches – need to be drastically revised as a matter of urgency.

While media attention focuses largely on the tragedy of lost football heroes, this is a much larger problem for youth players. Less than .01% of the people who play football in this country play at the professional level – but almost half of all children aged 11-15 play the game.

If children are permitted to head the ball between the ages of 12 and 18, this means six years of damaging behaviour. Children are not able to make informed decisions and need to be protected. There is no logical reason for the ban on heading footballs in training to stop at the age 12. Headers can wait until 18. The sport will survive just fine without them.

Keith Parry, Deputy Head Of Department in Department of Sport & Events Management, Bournemouth University; Eric Anderson, Professor of Masculinities, Sexualities and Sport, University of Winchester, and Howard Hurst, Senior lecturer in Sport, Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, University of Central Lancashire

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Programme Available | The 12th Annual Postgraduate Research Conference

The 12th Annual Postgraduate Research Conference, Wednesday 2 December

The conference programme for oral presentations is now available.

Booking for the conference via Eventbrite is open, you can book to attend the full day or select specific sessions to fit around other commitments.

All student and staff are invited so please spread the word and come along to support the BU postgraduate research community.

I look forward to seeing you there.

Posters will be available for viewing on the conference webpage from Monday 30 November.

Who Made That Twitter Bird? - The New York Times #BUPGRConf20 | #BUDoctoralCollege  Who Made That Twitter Bird? - The New York Times

Professor Dimitrios Buhalis was named by @webofscience as Highly Cited Researcher 2020.

Professor Dimitrios Buhalis was named by @webofscience as Highly Cited Researcher 2020.
Professor Dimitrios Buhalis Buhalis Highly Cited Researcher 2020
Each year, Clarivate™ identifies the world’s most influential researchers ─ the select few who have been most frequently cited by their peers over the last decade.
In 2020, fewer than 6,200, or about 0.1%, of the world’s researchers, in 21 research fields and across multiple fields, have earned this exclusive distinction.
This is an elite group recognized for your exceptional research influence, demonstrated by the production of multiple highly-cited papers that rank in the top 1% by citations for field and year in the Web of Science™.

Research Assistant Post

A short-term position is required to help support a British Academy funded project. This is a BU contracted, part-time position, starting in early January 2021. It is essential that you have a very good working knowledge of NVivo.

Key duties include: the collection and analysis of corporate annual report; generating ‘word frequency’ analysis of reports using NVivo 12; presenting analysis using NVivo and Excel. Additional analysis may include gathering financial indicators from the Thomson Reuters database.

If you would like to find out more, please contact Dr John Oliver (FMC) at joliver@bournemouth.ac.uk

The impact of COVID-19 on workforce stress and resilience – Parliamentary Health and Social Care Committee Publication

The COVID-19 pandemic has created major upheaval across the world, and for frontline practitioners in social work, this led to sudden changes in working practices alongside homeworking. In the summer of 2020, Parliament started to conduct an inquiry exploring workforce burnout and resilience in the NHS and social care as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. As part of this they put out a call for evidence from interested parties, and were particularly interested into early research findings. Areas of interest to the inquiry included the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on resilience, levels of workforce stress, and burnout across the NHS and social care sectors and the impacts of workforce burnout on service delivery, staff, patients and service users across the NHS and social care sectors.

At the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic in March 2020 Professor Lee-Ann Fenge and Emily Rosenorn-Lanng from Bournemouth University developed a collaborative research project with Tilia Lenz from the Pan-Dorset and Wiltshire Teaching partnership (PDWTP) to explore the impact of COVID-19 on practitioners and managers, and to date this has been completed by 146 participants. We submitted evidence to this inquiry based on our preliminary findings, and this has now been published by the Health and Social Care Committee.

https://committees.parliament.uk/work/494/workforce-burnout-and-resilience-in-the-nhs-and-social-care/publications/written-evidence/?page=3

This publication recognises the importance of the research undertaken by BU and the PDWTP during COVID-19, and the contribution this makes to understanding how practitioners have responded to the unprecedented challenges created by the pandemic.